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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams
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    What Factors Influence Gluten-free Diet Adherence in Young Adult Men with Celiac Disease?

      Self-assurance, authority, and confidence are key factors to a successful gluten-free diet for young adult men.

    Caption: What factors are most important in helping young men with celiac disease to remain gluten-free? Photo: CC--katieg93

    Celiac.com 03/03/2017 - Previous studies have shown us that men are generally less troubled living with celiac disease than are women, but most studies of men with celiac disease have been mostly quantitative, and have a bio-medical emphasis.

    A team of researchers recently set out to explore the social experience of young men with screening-detected celiac disease and to highlight daily life situations five years after diagnosis. The research team included Ethel Kautto, Cecilia Olsson, Anneli Ivarsson, Phil Lyon, Agneta Hörnell, and Lena Alex. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Food and Nutrition and Umeå Center for Gender Studies, Umeå University, Sweden, the Department of Food and Nutrition, Umeå University, Sweden, the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Sweden, the School of Arts, Social Sciences and Management at Queen Margaret University, UK, and the Department of Nursing at Umeå University in Sweden.

    Using a large Swedish school-based celiac screening-study, the team arranged to interview seven young men, all of whom were diagnosed with celiac disease at 13 years-old.

    The semi-structured interviews were analyzed from a gender perspective which resulted in three themes. Those themes were of young adult men being subjected to changes, striving for normality and emphasizing commitment.

    Many of young men reported dissociating themselves from being seen as a person with a life-long chronic disease.

    The analysis also showed that the young men’s daily experiences of living with celiac disease largely depended on their use of characteristics known to be associated with masculinity: such as being self-assured, demanding, and behaving authoritatively.

    In food situations, where the young men had the ability to make use of such characteristics in their informal group, they experienced fewer negative aspects of the disease.

    If the young men did not hold a strong position in their informal group, their situation was insecure and vulnerable and this could lead to avoidance of contacts and social meal situations.

    So, basically, being relaxed and socially confident about eating gluten-free helps to ensure success with the diet.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2007 - A recent study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology suggests that individuals afflicted with celiac disease in childhood suffer long-term mortality rates that are three times higher than those of the general population
    The study set out to determine the most common celiac symptoms faced by clinicians, and to determine how effective an active case-finding strategy might be in raising the levels of diagnosis.
    Researchers led by Dr. Masoud Solaymani-Dodaran of Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK, compared differences in long-term mortality in celiac patients diagnosed as children or adults against long-term mortality rates for the general population.
    The results showed that standardized mortality ratios for celiac patients more than 5 years after childhood diagnosis were 3.32, while ratios for those diagnosed as adults were 1.38.
    Deaths from accidents, suicide, and violence, malignancies, and cerebrovascular diseases largely accounted for the elevated mortality risk among celiacs diagnosed as children. For those diagnosed as adults, excess mortality rates were largely due to malignant neoplasms.
    Researchers said that nature of, and the increase in, mortality rates suffered by children with celiac was both largely unexpected, and surprising, when compared to those of adults.
    Noting that celiacs diagnosed as adults faced only a "reassuringly small increase" in long-term mortality rates; rates that are approximately half of those of patients with Crohn's disease, for example.
    They contrasted the adult rates to the markedly higher mortality rates faced by celiacs diagnosed as children, which, they said was "difficult to attribute directly to the disease itself."
    They concluded that even though the increased risk of mortality for faced by celiacs diagnosed as children was small overall, the excess of deaths from accidents, suicides, and violence, were, nonetheless, a "cause for concern."
    American Journal of Gastroenterology. April, 2007; 102:864-870
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/07/2008 - No, this is not some kind of April Fool’s joke.When I read this report, I just about fell off my chair. New research indicates thatbeing poor and living in squalor might actually provide some benefitagainst the development of celiac disease.
    A team of medicalresearchers recently set out to examine gene-environmental interactionsin the pathogenesis of celiac disease. The research team was made up ofA. Kondrashova, K. Mustalahti, K. Kaukinen, H. Viskari, V. Volodicheva,A. M. Haapala, J. Ilonen, M. Knip, M. Mäki, H. Hyöty, T. E. Group.Finland and nearby Russian Karelia have populations that eat about thesame amounts of the same grains and grain products. The two populationsalso have a high degree of shared genetic ancestry. The only majordifference between the populations of the two areas lies in theirsocioeconomic conditions.
    The region of Russian Karelia ismuch poorer than the neighboring areas in nearby Finland. Thesanitation levels in Russian Karelia are also distinctly inferior thanthey are in Finland. The researchers compared the prevalence of celiacdisease and predisposing human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles inpopulations from Russian Karelia and Finland. The team performedscreening for tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG) and HLA-DQalleles on 1988 school-age children from Karelia and 3654 children fromFinland. Children with transglutaminase antibodies were encouraged tohave a duodenal biopsy.
    Interestingly, the patients fromRussian Karelia showed tTG antibodies far less often than their Finnishcounterparts (0.6% compared to 1.4%, P = 0.005). The patients fromRussian Karelia also showed Immunoglobulin class G (IgG) antigliadinantibodies far less frequently than their Finnish patients (10.2%compared to 28.3%, P<0.0001).
    The researchers confirmed adiagnosis of celiac disease by duodenal biopsy in four of the eighttransglutaminase antibody-positive Karelian children, for an occurrencerate of 1 in 496 versus 1 in 107 Finnish children.
    In bothgroups, the same HLA-DQ alleles were associated with celiac disease andthe presence of transglutaminase antibodies. The patients from RussianKarelia showed a much lower prevalence of transglutaminase antibodiesand celiac disease than the Finnish children. 
    The poorconditions and inferior hygienic conditions in Russian Karelia mightprovide some kind of protection against the development of celiacdisease. The value of studies like this aren’t to make us wax nostalgicfor poverty, or to encourage people to fend off celiac disease bybecoming poor and living in squalid conditions. The value of a studylike this lies in the idea that there may be more to the development ofceliac disease than simple biological factors. That environmentalconditions might play a key role in both the frequency ofceliac-related antibodies, and in the development of the disease itselfis quite intriguing and clearly warrants further and more comprehensivestudy.
    Ann Med. 2008;40(3):223-31.


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    Thank you GFinDC. Question. When you say, "quick rinse", can you define what is safe for us to use when washing our fruits and veggies? I know that might sound like something I should know but I am seriously taking no chances (at least not on purpose). I've been buying organic produce because I was told I needed to. Do you find that to be true or do I need to find a new nutritionist? 😉
    Hi Wade, You areright, there are lots of little gotchas out there in the gluten-filled world.  That's why it is easier/safer to stick with whole foods at the beginning of the gluten-free diet.  The list of ingredients on an apple or an orange or a steak is usually real short.  So you can get out of the grocery store quicker by eating whole foods like those.  Plain frozen veggies or canned are usually safe too.  And fresh produce as long as you give it a quick rinse.
    Why....why would your doctor not follow the standard of care for testing celiac disease?  I think you need to think about  finding another doctor.  If you are in the US, you can “walk” into a lab and order the test and pay cash: https://labtestsonline.org/tests/celiac-disease-antibody-tests No, your result does not significantly lower your odds of getting a celiac disease diagnosis.  She ordered the LEAST commonly used test, especially since she only ordered that one alone.  I think she thinks you do not have celiac disease, but that you may have a gluten sensitivity.  But that is wrong!  There is no test for gluten sensitivity.  http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ https://www.mayocliniclabs.com/it-mmfiles/Celiac_Disease_Diagnostic_Testing_Algorithm.pdf https://celiac.org/about-celiac-disease/screening-and-diagnosis/screening/ https://www.verywellhealth.com/celiac-disease-blood-tests-562694 https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diagnostic-tests/celiac-disease-health-care-professionals I am not a doctor though.  Perhaps, you can ask her why she did not order the complete panel or at least the screening tests most often ordered for celiac disease. Know that some celiacs are asymptomatic (no symptoms) Some just have one symptom.  Some have classic symptoms.  I presented with only anemia and no GI symptoms with only a positive on the DGP IgA.    I hope this helps.  
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