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  • Tina Turbin
    Tina Turbin

    Celiac Disease Prevalence is on the Rise

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.
    Celiac Disease Prevalence is on the Rise -

    Celiac.com 08/19/2011 - According to recent estimates, 3 million Americans suffer from celiac disease - approximately 1% of the population, and only three percent of them have to this writing been correctly diagnosed. As startling as that sounds to us all, according to a news article on Medscape Today, the incidence of celiac disease has increased markedly over the last three decades, perhaps even as fourfold, and studies are suggesting the incidence may actually be higher than 1% of the population.

    What is the reason for this? According to Dr. Jonas Ludvigsson, MD, from the Department of Medicine, Epidemiology Unit at the Karolinska Institute and Orebro University Hospital in Sweden, and a renowned celiac expert, there may be many factors explaining this, but there probably is an actual increase underlying these.



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    The Medscape article went on to report that the Mayo Clinic has confirmed increase in celiac disease incidence, reported in Discovery's Edge, the Mayo Clinic's research magazine. Dr. Joseph Murray, MD, and colleagues analyzed stored blood samples from Air Force recruits in the early 1950s for gluten antibodies. It was assumed that 1% would be positive, given today's estimates, but the number of positive results was far smaller. Dr. Murray and his colleagues compared their results with two more recently collected sets with the conclusion that celiac disease is about four times more common today than it was in the 1950's.

    Additionally, Dr. Ludviggon's research team in Sweden has found that those living with celiac disease and latent celiac disease have higher mortality than those who don't have these conditions. Latent celiac disease is also known as "gluten sensitivity," a term to describe those who have "normal small intestinal mucosa but positive celiac disease serology," estimated to affect 1 in 1000 people. According to Dr. Ludvigsson's research team, in 1 year, 10 of 1000 individuals with celiac disease will die, as compared with 7 in 1000 individuals without the disease. The mortality rate is increased among those who also have latent celiac disease as well. The increased risk, however, is quite small.

    As alarming as the statistics are regarding the increasing rate of celiac disease, Dr. Ludvigsson shares some good news with Medscape—the methods of diagnosing celiac disease are actually improving. According to some other estimates, the rate of celiac diagnosis rate is increasing. For those who are testing positive for the celiac disease, the only method of treatment currently available is eliminating gluten from the diet. Yes, this is a simple treatment, although it can require some challenging lifestyle adjustments for the gluten-free community, something which I address in my work as an author, researcher, and gluten-free advocate. In the future, we may see other treatments such as gluten-digesting enzymes (which are on the rise) or even the genetic modification of the structure of gluten in wheat so that it will not cause an autoimmune reaction in celiac patients. Even with celiac diagnosis incidence on the rise, with raised awareness and effective diagnosis, we can help change the lives of millions of celiac Americans for the better. This is an important endeavor.



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  • About Me

    Tina Turbin

    Tina Turbin is a world-renowned Celiac advocate who researches, writes, and consults about the benefits of the gluten-free, paleo-ish, low carb and keto diets, and is a full time recipe developer and founder of PaleOmazing.com. Tina also founded and manages the popular website, GlutenFreeHelp.info, voted the #2 .info website in the world. Tina believes that celiacs need to be educated to be able to make informed decisions and that Paleo needs to be tailored to the individual’s physiology to obtain desired results. You can reach her at: INFO@PaleOmazing.com.


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  • Related Articles

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 10/12/2011 - According to recent estimates, three million Americans suffer from celiac disease—approximately 1% of the population, and only three percent of them have to this writing been correctly diagnosed. As startling as that sounds to us all, according to a news article on Medscape Today, the incidence of celiac disease has increased markedly over the last three decades, perhaps even as fourfold, and studies are suggesting the incidence may actually be higher than 1% of the population.
    What is the reason for this? According to Dr. Jonas Ludvigsson, MD, from the Department of Medicine, Epidemiology Unit at the Karolinska Institute and Orebro University Hospital in Sweden, and a renowned celiac expert, there may be many factors explaining this, but there probably is an actual increase underlying these.
    The Medscape article went on to report that the Mayo Clinic has confirmed increase in celiac disease incidence, reported in Discovery's Edge, the Mayo Clinic's research magazine. Dr. Joseph Murray, MD, and colleagues analyzed stored blood samples from Air Force recruits in the early 1950s for gluten antibodies. It was assumed that 1% would be positive, given today's estimates, but the number of positive results was far smaller. Dr. Murray and his colleagues compared their results with two more recently collected sets with the conclusion that celiac disease is about four times more common today than it was in the 1950s.
    Additionally, Dr. Ludviggon's research team in Sweden has found that those living with celiac disease and latent celiac disease have higher mortality than those who don't have these conditions. Latent celiac disease is also known as "gluten sensitivity," a term to describe those who have "normal small intestinal mucosa but positive celiac disease serology," estimated to affect 1 in 1000 people. According to Dr. Ludvigsson's research team, in 1 year, 10 of 1000 individuals with celiac disease will die, as compared with 7 in 1000 individuals without the disease. The mortality rate is increased among those who also have latent celiac disease as well. The increased risk, however, is quite small.
    As alarming as the statistics are regarding the increasing rate of celiac disease, Dr. Ludvigsson shares some good news with Medscape—the methods of diagnosing celiac disease are actually improving. According to some other estimates, the rate of celiac diagnosis rate is increasing. For those who are testing positive for the celiac disease, the only method of treatment currently available is eliminating gluten from the diet. Yes, this is a simple treatment, although it can require some challenging lifestyle adjustments for the gluten-free community, something which I address in my work as an author, researcher, and gluten-free advocate. In the future, we may see other treatments such as gluten-digesting enzymes (which are on the rise) or even the genetic modification of the structure of gluten in wheat so that it will not cause an autoimmune reaction in celiac patients. Even with celiac diagnosis incidence on the rise, with raised awareness and effective diagnosis, we can help change the lives of millions of celiac Americans for the better. This is an important endeavor.



    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/20/2013 - New technologies and ingredients are helping manufacturers to improve the look, taste and nutritional profile of gluten-free food products, a market that is expected to grow to $6 billion by 2017, according to a presentation at the 2013 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Annual Meeting & Food Expo in Chicago.
    In addition to growing numbers of people with celiac disease, and gluten sensitivity, much of the demand is being driven by people with preference for gluten-free foods, said Chris Thomas, senior food technologist at Ingredion, Inc.
    Manufacturers of gluten-free foods have historically focused on the 'gluten-free' aspects of their products.
    This approach as resulted in gluten-free products which are gritty, or dry in texture and have a short shelf life. To mask these negative features, or to enhance bland flavor, many gluten-free products contain high amounts of sugar and offer little nutritional value.
    That is changing rapidly. "Now, consumers want nutrition quality, variety and appearance," says Thomas.
    Consumer demand and new manufacturing approaches, including the development and use of flours, starches and bran made from alternative ingredients, are leading to gluten-free products with better texture, flavor and nutritional profiles than in the past.
    By using native functional tapioca and rice-based flours, manufacturers of gluten-free foods are eliminating grittiness and crumbliness, and crafting products with texture, color and appearance that is similar to wheat-containing counterparts.
    The resulting gluten-free products are also similar to wheat-based products in term of calories, fat content, overall nutrition and shelf life.
    One huge advance toward better gluten-free food products comes from the commercial use of pulses. These are the edible seeds of leguminous crops, such as peas, lentils, chickpeas and edible beans, which have a high viscosity, as well as high levels of protein, fiber and other nutrients. They are being used to create flour and starch-like substances for better gluten-free products.
    So far, pulses have been used to create a number of gluten-free pastas, baked goods, snacks, breadcrumb substitutes, and even milk-like beverages in the international food market, says Mehmet Tulbek, Ph.D, the global director of the research, development and innovation division of Alliance Grain Traders (AGT).
    All of these developments, coupled with strong market growth, mean that consumers of gluten-free foods can look forward to more and better gluten-free products coming very soon.
    Source:
    http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-07-technologies-ingredients-options-gluten-free.html


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