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  • Jefferson Adams

    Celiac Disease Vaccine Set to Begin Full Human Trials

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 07/19/2016 - The world's first vaccine aimed at curing celiac disease is slated to begin full trials later this year, and residents of the Australian state of Victoria will be among the first humans to give it a try against celiac disease.

    The vaccine, called Nexvax2, was developed by Australian scientist Dr Bob Anderson, and is aimed at giving celiac patients a chance to overcome their immune reaction to the gluten found in products containing wheat, rye and barley. Nexvax2 aims to de-sensitise patients to three peptides contained in gluten that trigger a damaging reaction in their immune system.



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    Previous trials on 150 patients from Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide, Brisbane and Auckland were aimed at finding a safe dosage rather than assessing its ability to beat celiac disease. Results from those favorable earlier trials were released in May, and Dr Anderson says that the larger phase II study, also being undertaken in the US and Europe, will assess how well the vaccine works against celiac disease.

    Dr Anderson first identified the peptides triggering coeliac disease and began developing the vaccine while working at Melbourne's Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, before travelling to Boston for six weeks as part of a sister city arrangement through the City of Melbourne, where he made contact with ImmusanT to further the discovery.

    This is certainly exciting news for people with celiac disease, many of whom may benefit from such treatment.

    Stay tuned for news on the progress of these trials.

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    So, never mind all the dangerous effects that wheat gluten has and forget about the pesticide? Sorry, but after being gluten free for over 3 years I am not sure why anyone would want to go back to the stuff.

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    This sounds very interesting. Remember, too, that you can eat organic, non-GMO, so if it were possible to eat gluten, it might not be necessary to ingest (other) poisons.

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    Hell, I'll fly to AU to volunteer :)

    Let's book a plane! I wouldn't go back to a gluten diet but with this the contamination wouldn't be a big risk/scare when in public settings. I've worked with vaccines first hand, I know most are very safe; I'd jump on this in a heart beat.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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