Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac Disease with Mild Enteropathy is Not Mild Disease

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 03/20/2013 - People with celiac disease all have some degree of damage to the small intestinal mucosa, ranging from lymphocytic duodenosis with normal villous structure to severe villous atrophy.

    To determine whether the severity of mucosal lesions was associated with clinical and laboratory features of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently conducted a study on celiac disease with mild enteropathy.

    Photo: CC--benchiladaThe researchers included B. Zanini, F. Caselani, A. Magni, D. Turini, A. Ferraresi, F. Lanzarotto, V. Villanacci, N. Carabellese, C. Ricci, A. Lanzini. They are affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit at the University of Brescia in Brescia, Italy.

    For their study, they compared demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics among patients with celiac disease who were classified based on the severity of duodenal lesions.

    The team assessed data from 1408 adult celiac patients seen consecutively at an outside referral center since 1990. 1249 patients showed villous atrophy, while 159 showed mild enteropathy (n = 159).

    Patients with villous atrophy, compared with mild enteropathy, showed similar rates of weight loss (17% vs 17%), gastrointestinal manifestations (70% vs 70%), extra-intestinal manifestations (66% vs 57%), and other associated conditions (19% vs 23%).

    Patients with villous atrophy more commonly developed osteopenia or osteoporosis than patients with mild enteropathy (22% vs 5%; P = .0005).

    Compared to those with mild enteropathy, patients with villous atrophy had higher rates of anemia (42% vs 29%; P = .002), folate deficiency (75% vs 64%; P = .02), hypocholesterolemia (7% vs 2%; P = .02), hypocalcemia (26% vs 13%; P = .004), or hyperparathyroidism (45% vs 29%; P = .004).

    Although osteopenia, osteoporosis, and test results that fall outside of laboratory parameters are common among celiac disease patients with mild enteropathy, they are more common and more severe in patients with villous atrophy.

    Patients with villous atrophy and those with mild enteropathy showed similar rates of celiac-associated conditions. These results indicate that celiac disease with mild enteropathy is not mild disease, and definitely requires treatment with a gluten-free diet.

    What do you think? Do you have celiac disease with mild enteropathy? Do you consider this to be a 'mild' condition? Share your comments below.

    Source:


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Agreed! That's like saying you have stage 2 lung cancer that's "mild" because it's not stage 4, but it's still cancer! I think there's a stigma around mild celiac that seems to imply you don't need to be as strict with a gluten-free diet, when really it's just as important as anyone with damage.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I have marsh 2, no antibodies. 10 years ago.. It was marsh 1. Then I had a lot of pain ago. 10 years later all my vitamins run out. I could not function anymore, feeling like a zombie. I also have dermatitis herpetiformis. I am know on a gluten free diet, but it Will take long before I will be better again, still tired but slowly getting a little bit better. Please investigate this condition more!

    I don't have the normal genes. My Son also has celiac, he was diagnosed at 7. First the doctor called my condition gluten sensitivity, but have DF also, so it makes it celiac.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

×
×
  • Create New...