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    Celiac Disease From Medical Authorities


    Scott Adams

    Celiac.com 02/26/2007 - Celiac disease is an inherited autoimmune disorder. Even though celiac disease is genetic, and generally runs in families, it can sometimes be triggered by, or become active for the first time after, surgery, pregnancy, childbirth, viral infection, or severe emotional stress.


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    People with untreated celiac disease typically have abnormally high levels of associated antibodies including anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium and anti-tissue transglutaminase. The presence of these antibodies is caused by an immune system reaction to the presence of gluten in the body.

    When people with celiac disease eat foods or use products containing gluten, the response from their immune system damages the tiny, fingerlike protrusions lining the small intestine, called villi. Properly working villi allow nutrients from food to be absorbed into the bloodstream. When villi are damaged, vital nutrients go unabsorbed. In addition to vitamin deficiencies and their associated maladies, left untreated, villi damage can result in full-blown malabsorption, accompanied by nerve damage, wasting, and organ distress and failure.

    Until fairly recently doctors believed celiac disease was quite rare, and only affected about 1 in 5,000 people. It was also thought of a disease that mostly affected babies and very young children. Recent studies, however, put the estimate of celiac sufferers at 1 in 133 people in the United States. Most people with celiac disease still dont know that they have it.

    More alarmingly, many experts believe that Non-Celiac gluten intolerance could be upwards of 15 times more prevalent than full-blown celiac disease. According to some experts up to 15% of people worldwide—a full 1 in 7—are gluten-sensitive or gluten-intolerant. These people often test negative or inconclusive for Celiac Disease, but can still suffer the same symptoms and long-term problems when they ingest gluten.

    Signs and Symptoms of Celiac Disease

    Its very important to diagnose both celiac disease and Non-Celiac gluten intolerance early before any serious damage to the intestine occurs. However, both can be difficult to diagnose because their symptoms are easily confused with other intestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome or lactose intolerance, thus many people may never discover that they have some level of gluten sensitivity.

    Some common general symptoms of celiac disease are diarrhea, abdominal pain and bloating, and weight loss. People with the disease may feel overly tired, and they may also be irritable or depressed. Some have skin rashes and mouth sores. Teens with undiagnosed celiac disease may go through puberty late.

    Symptoms of Celiac Disease can vary greatly from individual to individual, and even among family members. Symptoms may occur in the digestive system, or in other parts of the body. For example, one person might have diarrhea and abdominal pain, while another person may be irritable or depressed. In fact, irritability is one of the most common symptoms in children.

    Obviously, since so much growth and development crucial to human well being takes place in infancy and childhood, and since so much of that development hinges on proper nutritional absorption, any condition which hinders absorption is especially important diagnose and treat in the earliest possible stages.

    More specific symptoms of celiac disease may include one or more of the following:

    behavioral changes

    bone or joint pain

    • chronic diarrhea

    delayed growth

    • failure to thrive in infants

    • fatigue

    • gas

    infertility, recurrent miscarriage

    • itchy skin rash called
    dermatitis herpetiformis

    • missed menstrual periods (often because of excessive weight loss)

    • muscle cramps

    osteoporosis, osteopenia

    • pale, foul-smelling, or fatty stool

    • pale sores inside the mouth, called aphthous

    • recurring abdominal bloating and pain

    seizures

    tingling numbness in the legs (from nerve damage)

    • tooth discoloration or loss of enamel

    unexplained anemia (a low count of red blood cells causing fatigue)

    • weight loss / weight gain

    Screening for Celiac Disease

    A simple blood test can reveal high levels of anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies, and is often used for initial detection among people who are most likely to have the disease, and who may need further testing.

    For anyone with a family history of celiac disease or of disorders such as thyroid disease, anemia of unknown cause, type I diabetes or other immune disorders or Downs syndrome, doctors may suggest routine screening. Otherwise, patients are generally screened on a case-by-case basis according to individual symptoms.

    If a blood test for gluten antibodies is positive, your doctor will likely order a biopsy to confirm a diagnosis of celiac disease. A biopsy is where your doctor microscopically examines a small sample of intestinal tissue, looking for celiac associated damage to the small intestine.

    To get the sample, your doctor inserts an endoscope (a thin, flexible tube) into your mouth, down your esophagus and into your stomach and small intestine to take a small sample of intestinal tissue to look for damage to the villi (the tiny, hair-like projections in the walls the small intestine that absorb vitamins, minerals and other nutrients).

    Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance

    Many people with celiac disease are still screened using antiquated methods. After a positive serology test a patient might be given a biopsy (or not—depending on how high their antibody levels are—again elevated antibodies may mean gluten sensitivity), however, the pathologist who interprets the samples may not use the latest Marsh classification system to make the diagnosis, or they may use it but classify the samples incorrectly, any of which can lead to a missed diagnosis. Most people with gluten intolerance will never get tested at all, and if they do their results often end up in the "inconclusive" or grey area for the reasons discussed above. Consequently this undiagnosed or inconclusive group of people may miss out on discovering the simple and drug-free remedy of a gluten-free diet which will lead to a dramatic recovery for those with symptoms (many people with celiac disease or Non Celiac gluten sensitivity do not have any symptoms).

    For those who end up in the grey area of inconclusive test results, an elimination diet may be the only method to determine their problem. Many people discover that they have gluten intolerance only after they eliminate it from their diet. The more symptomatic the patient, the more obvious it will be when they eliminate gluten. For those with little or no symptoms this method may not work. Most elimination diets also exclude other common food allergens for several weeks such as soy, cows milk, corn, nuts, etc., and then the items are slowly added back to the diet while the patient pays close attention to any symptoms.


    Treatments for Celiac Disease

    There is presently no cure for celiac disease or Non Celiac gluten sensitivity, however, totally eliminating gluten from the diet leads to a full recovery in most cases, thus a 100% gluten-free diet is the standard treatment for celiac disease.

    To manage the disease and prevent complications, its essential to avoid all foods that contain gluten. People with celiac disease must avoid all foods made with wheat, rye, or barley. Including types of wheat like durum, farina, graham flour, and semolina. Also, bulgur, kamut, kasha, matzo meal, spelt and triticale. Examples of products that commonly contain these include breads, breading, batter, cereals, cooking and baking mixes, pasta, crackers, cookies, cakes, pies and gravies, among others.

    It is also important to avoid oats, at least during initial treatment stages of a gluten-free diet, this is because the effects of oats on celiac patients are not fully understood, and wheat contamination in processing is common. Thus, its safe to eliminate oats at least until symptoms subside and their reintroduction into the diet can be fairly monitored and evaluated. Avoid processed foods that may contain hidden gluten. Wheat flour is commonly used in many processed foods as a thickener or a binder.

    The good news is that by avoiding gluten your small intestine can and will begin to heal. Fortunately, the gut can and usually does heal. The majority of celiac disease and gluten intolerant patients who go on a gluten free diet experience a significant reversal of all symptoms and intestinal damage within year, and most begin to feel better within in a few days. In patients with severe damage the healing process may take years, and may require eliminating other offending foods from their diets in addition to gluten.

    Because the genetic makeup that leads to gluten intolerance cant be altered, a persons immune system will continue to react to gluten whenever it is ingested and the symptoms and problems will return if a person with celiac disease starts eating gluten again.

    health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

     

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    Guest Joseph McKernan

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    I was diagnosed in 1999. I have 1st cousin and a niece with it. My son has Type 1 diabetes and I have a 1st cousin with Lupus. You can see I am Irish!!!

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    Guest Amber Hills

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    Most of my family has celiac but it has been said that the blood tests don't show that you have celiac anymore. A bowl test is very expensive. For me it's not worth it to have all the torture I experience when I eat gluten products. The longer you wait can this cause severe damage to yourself?

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Foods derived from cereal grains (wheat, rye, barley, oats) are popular staples in our diet. In the past decade especially, a renewed enthusiasm for "whole grains", and increased dietary fiber, has lead to increased consumption of these cereals in relatively unrefined form, and often in combination, as with granola cereals, and whole wheat breads fortified with bran, coarse flours, and other additives. The argument in favor of whole grains is based on two considerations:
    1) The nutrient content of whole grains and their unrefined flours is greater than refined flours. White flour has been considered by some an inferior food since it is missing some micro-nutrients. However white flours and light white bread are sometimes better tolerated than the whole grain foods.
    2) The indigestible fiber in whole grains contributes to stool bulk, reduces the opportunity for constipation, and absorbs toxic or harmful molecules, which, escorted from the bowel by fiber, have less opportunity to do harm. The regulating and binding actions of grain fibber, it is argued, would reduce the incidence of bowel cancer, if eaten over a lifetime. The favorable fibers are probably better found in vegetables and fruit. While there favorable arguments for a high cereal grain intake there are major problems with these foods. Craving and compulsive eating of flour-based foods is common, especially the reward an dessert foods, containing sugar. These high-carbohydrate foods contribute the major caloric input to obese persons.
    The diseases clearly associated with Cereal grains or "Gluten intolerance" are the bowel disorders bearing the names,"celiac Disease", "Non-Tropical- Sprue", or "Gluten-Enteropathy", and the skin disorder, dermatitis herpetiformis.
    The clinical presentations of cereal-grain intolerance, which can be recognized from the history or pattern of illness alone include: Diarrhea, chronic with malabsorption, weight loss, micro-nutrient deficiencies, blood loss and anemia. Abdominal pain may be recurrent and associated with flutulence, distention, and intermittent bowel motility disturbance. Minor gluten-enteropathy may not involve diarrhea, and malabsorption may be inconspicuous or inconsistent. A nutritional anemia may be the presenting problem, although the patient will have an associated history of intermittent abdominal pain and distension. The anemia results from malabsorption iron, folic acid and/or vitamin B12.
    Arthritic or Fibrositic Syndromes: Aching, stiffness, and fatigue are three common symptoms which occur together in a variety of disorders, and occasionally remit completely on an elimination diet which excludes cereal-grains and other allergenic foods.
    Brain Disturbances: symptoms include deep, burning sensations in arms and legs, restless legs, numbness and tingling which comes on rapidly with sitting, squatting, and lying in bed; brain effects are manifest by a sense of confusion or "fuzzy-head, disorganization, irritability, and memory impairment. The occurrence of resting pain in joints, particularly the hands with slight swelling, and stiffness is the early prevention of rheumatoid arthritis; it can occur strictly as a manifestation of wheat (and other food) allergy. The activity of rheumatoid arthritis may be reduced in some patients by cereal grain and other allergenic food restriction.
    There are at least four mechanisms involved at the bowel level for gluten intolerance:
    1) Lack of the digestive enzyme, intestinal glutaminase.
    2) Antibody production to the prolamine, or a fragment of it.
    3) Increased permeability of the bowel to macromolecules including the antigenic protein and its fragments.
    4) Increased production and release of mediators such as histamine, seratonin, kinins, prostaglandins, and interleukins.
    A wheat gluten-triggered mechanism has been studied in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The clinical observation is that wheat ingestion is followed within hours by increased joint swelling and pain. Little and his colleagues studied the mechanism, as it developed sequentially, following gluten ingestion. Platelet Seratonin Release in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A study in Food Intolerant Patients. Little C. Stewart A.G., Fennesy M.R. Lancet 1983.297-9.
    The Gluten Proteins
    Gluten is a mixture of individual proteins, classified in two groups, the prolamines and the glutelins. The most troublesome component of Gluten is the Prolamine, Gliadin. It is Gliadin in wheat that causes the major problem in celiac disease, and Gliadin antibodies are most commonly found in the immune complexes, associated with major systemic disease (Unsworth, D.J., et. al., IgA Anti-Gliadin Antibodies in Celiac disease, Clin Exp Immunol. 1981: 46:286-93.Keiffer M, et. al., Wheat Gliadin Fractions and Other Cereal Antigens Reactive with Antibodies in the Sera of of Celiac Patients, Clin Exp Immunol. 1982;50:651-60).
    We eat the seeds of the grain plants. The seed has a bran casing, a starchy endosperm which contains 90 % of the protein, and a small germ nucleus which is the plant embryo, waiting to grow. Any flour made from the starchy endosperm contains prolamines and is potentially toxic to the grain intolerant person.
    If we look at the different grains we find that each has its own prolamine. The following list gives the type of prolamine each grain contains, and the percentage of protein the prolamine has in relationship to the entire grain:
    Wheat - Gliadin - 69% Rye - Secalinin - 30-50% Oats - Avenin - 16% Barley - Hordein - 46-52% Millet - Panicin - 40% Corn - Zien - 55% Rice - Orzenin- 5% Sorghum - Kafirin - 52% Celiac disease may serve as a model of wheat allergy. No-one should make the mistake of assuming this is the only form of wheat allergy. When wheat is the principle problem food, there is a consensus that barley, oats, and rye must be excluded as well. Millet, is intermediate in the list of offenders; corn and rice are usually tolerated when gluten prolamines are the chief and only food intolerance, although corn is a major food-allergen in its own right. Triticale is a new hybrid grain with the properties of wheat and rye, and is excluded on a gluten-free diet [bell L., Hoffer M., Recommendations for Foods of Questionable Acceptance for Patients with Celiac Disease,J.Can. Dietetic Ass'n: 1981; 42:2; 143-15]. The identity and the amount of the prolamine decides the kind of reaction that is likely to occur. It should be noted that there is considerable variability in the prolamine content of various foods made from cereal grains, and this variability is one of the many reasons why food reactions are not consistent.
    The usual definition of celiac disease links chronic diarrhea, with evidence of malabsorption, and changes in the surface of the small bowel. Most medical textbooks dogmatically state that an intestinal biopsy must be taken and must show typical changes before the diagnosis is made. The biopsy allows a pathologist to examine microscopically the surface of the small intestine. The surface of the small intestine is covered by a dense mat of projecting nipples called villi which shed cells containing digestive enzymes, and absorb food molecules. In long-standing celiac disease one expects the villi to be blunted and the surface to be smoothed out. While the biopsy is a useful procedure it has several drawbacks;
    It is a procedure with a small incidence of dangerous complication, especially bowel perforation.
    It is a small sample and may miss patchy or irregular bowel changes.
    Significant protein intolerance, and increased bowel porosity may exist despite normal appearance of the bowel lining under the microscope.
    Patients in remission or with intermittent symptoms may have normal biopsy results but remain exquisitely sensitive to some prolamine, or peptide fragment challenges. [bjarnson, I., et. al., Intestinal Permeability Defect in Celiac Disease, Lancet. 1983 1284-85].
    The most significant test of gluten intolerance is remission of symptoms when grains are eliminated for a trial period of 3-6 weeks. I have often reviewed the history of patients with chronic diarrhea, and associated abnormalities, who have been "thoroughly investigated" in an academic center and left untreated because their biopsy result was normal. Physicians, who make therapeutic decisions solely on the basis of biopsy results are being dogmatic, not scientific, and certainly not serving the best interests of their patients who simply want to be better. Investigations which do not lead to effective therapy are of no value to patients.
    Diagnosis of gluten-sensitivity in all disorders may be facilitated in the near future by better immunological laboratory tests, including measurement of circulating serum antibodies directed against these proteins, and of circulating immune complexes which contain food antigens. [O'Farrelly, et. al., Alpha-Gliadin Antibody Levels: A Serological Test for Celiac Disease, 1983 Lancet; 286:2007-2010]. Better tests would permit the demonstration of increased GITPERM, and the entrance of abnormal macromolecules after test meals. Eventually the path through the body of such molecules may be studied by labeling them with isotopes, and tracking them with scanning methods like positron emission tomography.
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    An unexplained bowel disturbance, characterized by abdominal pain, gas, diarrhea, often alternating with constipation, is diagnosed as the "Irritable Bowel Syndrome" and too often attributed to "psychogenic causes". We recognize right away that the label "psychogenic causes" describes the lack of biological understanding more than it describes the patient's problem. The treatment usually offered includes bulk laxatives, tranquilizers mixed with antispasmodic drugs, and not infrequently, a trip to the psychiatrist, who is not likely to do a dietary history. The success rate with these methods in one study was only 12%! [Waller, S.L., Misiewicsz: Lancet 1969 ii: 753-6, Prognosis in Irritable Bowel Syndrome].Food studies are seldom undertaken in the assessment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Not a single patient whom I have seen with this disorder has had a food diary examined, nor any trial of exclusion diets. Dietary advice commonly-given includes "high-fibber" diets, usually increased cereal grains, which are contraindicated. Studies which allege to rule out food intolerance are poorly conducted, often basing negative results on limited, selected food challenges. Proper studies would utilize the complete methodology of diet revision therapy, and would observe patients in real-life conditions, ingesting real food over a significant period of time.
    The irritable bowel syndrome is at least in part a food-intolerance disorder, and the program outlined in this book will generally be helpful. In a recent study by V. Alum Jones et al, food intolerance was shown to be a major factor in causing the irritable bowel syndrome in 25 patients. This study is of particular interest because it was arranged to reveal something of the mechanism of this disorder. The results indicate that this particular presentation of food intolerance was not the result of immune events, was not associated with high blood-histamine levels, nor circulating immune complexes. Rather the disturbance seemed to be related to increased levels of Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), synthesized and secreted by the bowel itself. Prostaglandin production is inhibited by ASA, and all of the other anti-arthritic medications, and may prevent the irritable bowel effect if taken before meals. The foods causing the irritable-bowel symptoms were (in order of frequency)
    Wheat...9 Corn .... 5 Milk.... 4 Coffee. 4 Tea..... 3 Citrus.. 2 All the patients found to be intolerant of wheat had normal results of intestinal biopsy. Not all wheat-induced bowel disorders are celiac disease! The important point, once again, is that the mechanisms of food intolerance are multiple and complex! The only practical way to study food intolerance is by trials of dietary revision, and challenges with real food. One interesting observation made by several of my patients is that they always got somewhat better while in hospital, having multiple tests done. Psychological factors? No. Hospital tests for gastrointestinal disorders always involve days of fasting. If you stop eating foods that are hurting you, your symptoms improve! Proper NP may avoid the waste, in terms of dollars and disappointment, that inappropriate medical investigation and treatment incurs, when a trial of appropriate DRT will often cure the "disease" under investigation.
    This not to deny that emotions influence bowel function, since this is clearly the case. The "Gut Brain Axis" has become a subject of specialized study because of the complexity of interaction of these two life-determining organ systems. Food selection, emotional experiences, and eating behaviors interact complexly. Anger, frustration, fear will profoundly influence food selection, appetite, digestion, and metabolism; while food selection, digestion and metabolism will determine your emotional reactivity. There is a continuous loop of causal relationships, not a one-way vector. When patients are told they have bowel dysfunction because of stress, tension, or anxiety, this is only a half truth. The other half of the truth is that patients have stress, tension, and anxiety because of bowel dysfunction.
    The more subjective mood-related symptoms are difficult to assess, and are attributed to "psychiatric causes" although no authority seems to know what that means! The brain effects are an expression of disorderly molecular flow through the brain. Specific nuero-active effects of grains include the circulating peptides, which have been described earlier in the book, as WMOD, and are further discussed in the last section of this chapter.
    Indications for Trial of Gluten Restriction
    NP advocates liberal gluten restrictions in a variety of circumstances, simply because the results are surprisingly good. The core diet developed by clinical trials, and described in subsequent chapters is initially free of cereal grains, since they are frequent offenders in food intolerance problems. Not only patients with bowel disorders benefit, but also people whose bowels function apparently well but suffer, fatigue, aching, swelling, and brain disturbances, expressed as mental and emotional upheavals.
    The specific patterns of disturbance which should invite a trial of the food-testing plan, and gluten restriction specifically are: Diarrhea, prolonged over three weeks, not associated with infections, or evidence of parasites or pathogenic bacteria in stool samples.
    Abdominal pain, especially if frequently recurrent, and associated with excess gas, and abdominal distensio (Irritable Bowel Syndrome).
    Anemia from iron, folic acid, or nutrient deficiency which is unexplained by blood loss, or dietary inadequacy, especially if associated with abdominal symptoms.
    Aching disorder, especially if the aching is generalized, associated with stiffness with inactivity, and dysethesiae ( odd burning, tingling sensations), and tender muscles. Any arthritic pattern, associated with diarrhea should be vigorously managed with gluten, milk, and egg restriction with careful testing of other foods for possible reactions.
    Fatigue, especially if associated with irritability, confusion or fuzzy-headedness, headache, and abdominal discomforts.
    Chronic asthma and rhinitis.
    Neurological symptoms which are unexplained by recognized abnormalities in physical examination and laboratory investigations. These symptoms include the above mentioned, memory disturbances, sleep disturbances, visual distortions, muscle weakness, and fasiculations (wiggly, jerking movements within muscles). A trial of gluten restriction is also appropriate in children with learning disability, schizophrenics, alcoholics, and patients with refractory mood disorders.
    Treatment of Grain Intolerance
    Exclusion of wheat, rye, barley, oats, and millet are the initial steps when gluten intolerance is suspected. The exclusion includes all the foods made with the flours of these common grains - Durham flour, Triticale, and Bugler are all excluded. The bran of these cereals is also excluded. A trial of an elimination diet lasting 3-6 weeks is sufficient to experience significant improvement in most bowel conditions. Longer periods of exclusion are required in conditions with chronic tissue inflammation, especially arthritis, and the skin disorders, eczema, and dermatitis herpetiformis, which sometimes requires an exclusion of several months before the skin condition remits completely.
    It is important to realize that multiple food intolerance are common and should be assumed, rather than assuming that single food intolerance's are the problem. NP does not consider it adequate therapy for a single food group to be eliminated, on the assumption that every other food will be well tolerated. Gluten restriction should be part of a more comprehensive dietary study, preferably in the form outlined in the food-testing plan. The best dietary plans are based on what is good to eat, more than what is bad to eat! No-one wants to be confronted with long lists of foods they must avoid. It is better to build a diet from scratch, emphasizing the positive. There is an entire universe of foods not related to milk, gluten-cereals, and eggs, the commonest problem foods!
    If improvement occurs, gluten restriction is maintained for many months at least before any effort is made to re-challenge with gluten foods. There are two exceptions, millet and oats. Millet is occasionally acceptable, early in an exclusion program although few people find it an attractive food, and it is potentially a trouble-maker.
    Oats is probably the best cereal to be re-introduced, and is often tolerated when wheat, rye, millet and barley are not. If gluten restriction is beneficial, oats may be tried after 2-3 months of abstinence. Some people, however, have specific and dramatic allergic reactions to oats, and acceptability must not be assumed. The major substitute for cereal grains is Rice The rice prolamine, orzenin, is different enough from gliadin to avoid immunological cross-reaction.
    Rice: Desirable Staple Food
    Rice is the staple food chosen for the core diet because it has low allergenicity, is versatile, widely available, and provides a carbohydrate caloric base to the diet. Rice comes in many varieties some of which are sufficiently different to be treated almost as separate foods.
    Converted white rice is preferred at the start of a core-diet program. Brown rice does contain more nutrients, and some prefer it by taste and texture; however, the husk also contains more potential problems. Rice-eating peoples generally polish their rice, removing the husk, because empirically the result is better. Again the nutritional arguments based on the nutrient content of foods outside of the body may be misleading! Brown rice may be well-tolerated, but should be introduced after tolerance for converted white rice is established. There are definite exceptions to this rule, as with all rules, since some patients do report better tolerance of selected varieties of brown rice.
    Rice can be utilized in a variety of forms, including rice cereals, rice pablum, puffed rice, rice-cakes, rice noodles, rice vermicelli, and rice flour (starch). Different rices vary sufficiently in taste, and texture to maintain culinary interest. Rice may be boiled with sunflower seeds, buckwheat, wild rice, other seeds, and legumes for added nutritional and culinary variety.
    All foods, including rice have the potential to be allergenic, however, and are not exempt from suspicion when adverse food reactions continue on a substitution diet. The most typical symptoms of rice intolerance are heavy fatigue, and chilliness. Rice may also produce the total grain syndrome, although this is uncommon in my experience. Following the core hypoallergenic diet plan, you will simply not miss cereal grains for a while, and find the variety and diversity of other vegetables, sufficient to sustain your interest and nutrition. The biggest challenge is to make the effort to choose different foods, and to prepare them attractively.
    Corn is less well tolerated than rice
    Our packaged, fast-food, and restaurant-food industries rely heavily on wheat flour to produce their products. The person on a gluten-free diet must make an extra effort to avoid these products, and to eat instead primary foods, including fresh produce, meats, fish, and rice.
    Most of my patients crave a carbohydrate food, if not a sugar food, then bread, buns, crackers, chips, nuts and so-on. Rice is a good alternative, being a starchy vegetable which turns sweet if you chew it for a while. Having rice available in a bowl in the refrigerator, mixed with vegetables, herbs, meats or fish offers an alternative to gluten-laden snack foods. Pasta is made with high gluten flour and is off our list of core diet foods. Again Rice is good alternative to pastas.
    Buckwheat
    Buckwheat is an interesting grain-like food to add to your diet, especially if Rice is not acceptable because of an adverse response to it. Buckwheat is not a grain, but belongs to the Polygonaceae family which includes sorrel, rhubarb and dock. Buckwheat is a seed, however, and resembles the grains in having a starchy endosperm, and can be ground into a flour, or cooked as a cereal, or prepared as rice. Buckwheat is not toxic to the celiac bowel, although some people react adversely to it. Buckwheat flour is disappointing for baking since it lacks gluten, the elastic, chewy component of bread.
    Other Alternatives to Cereal Grains
    Other starchy vegetables may stand in for grains. The potato is a starchy tuber, and potato starch can be used as a weak imitation of flour. Other roots are available, including Cassava an African vegetable which produces Arrowroot flour Tapioca is made by heating and moistening arrowroot. Flour is also made from Taro, a Japanese tuber, which is common in Hawaii where POI is a staple paste made from Taro roots. Soya beans are versatile and highly nutritious seeds which can be utilized as a flour as well. Tofu is the protein fraction of Soya beans, and is an inexpensive, nutritious food, used widely in the orient as a protein staple. It must be mixed with corn or another legume to produce a full complement of essential amino acids. The main problem with tofu is learning how to cook with it. Other legumes including, chick peas, lentils, peanuts are useful foods, on a gluten restricted diet, but have their own problems which must be considered before regular use of these foods is entertained.
    Each recommended food is still subject to testing, however, for each food may produce allergens or cause other problems. As with all foods in a sensitive person, the basic rule is - Find out how the food works in your body! Gluten-free diets specify food exclusions, including a variety of manufactured foods which contain Gluten. One generally can figure out what is not desirable by thinking of the probable origins of the food in question. Gluten exclusion does include malt, a barley product, and malt containing beverages (Postum, Ovaltine); beer and ale. Alcohol is usually excluded, although some tolerance may be found to selected wines, and distilled beverages. [Food for Celiacs; Campbell, J.A. : Journal of the Canadian Dietetic Ass'n., Jan '82 ; 43:1; 20-24; Gluten Free Cookbook: Leicht, L., RR#1 Box 54, Pender Island B.C. VON 2MO; Club House Foods 316 Rectory St. PO Box 788 London Ont. N6A 4Z2].
    The focus of a gluten-free cookery is often on replacing gluten flour in baked goods with starches made from rice, arrowroot, potato, Soya beans, other legumes like chickpeas,and wheat starch (all the protein has been carefully removed). While baking can be done with these non-gluten "flours", the results are never as satisfying as with wheat flour. Gluten is the most desirable ingredient in flour for producing bread, and baked goods, and its absence is conspicuous. In many respects it is easier, kinder, and nutritionally wiser to forgo the baked goods in large measure and eat other foods. The task of changing your diet is very much like moving to another country and culture. You may try to bring all your old habits with you, and struggle to get all of the ingredients that you are used to forming into meals, or you can gracefully, and with a sense of adventure try the new cuisine. Certainly bakery foods are delicious and tempting, but so are creatively prepared rice, vegetable, fruit, fish, and meat meals. Even with multiple exclusions, an appealing, varied diet is within reach if you are willing to change your eating style. A book of recipes which de-emphasizes, cereal-grains, eggs, and milk is a great asset. The cookbook "Oriental Food Feasts" is full of recipe ideas from China, Japan, Indonesia, and India. One has to select recipes that utilize foods, appropriate to your dietary needs. The main thing is to be inspired to create and enjoy a new cuisine that will diminish your disturbances, sustain your interest in food, and provide balanced nutrition. [shepard, S.M., Oriental Food Feasts, Arco Publishing, Inc. New York 1979]. Vegetable selection and preparation is one of the prerequisites of a successful diet revision. The Tassajara cookbook is my favorite introduction to the subject [Tassajara Cooking; 1973 Zen Centre; San Francisco; Shambala Publications, Inc. Boulder, CO.] .
    Neuropsychiatry & Gluten Intolerance
    We have recognized that Gluten intolerance may involve the absorption of complete proteins like gliadin, or its peptide- fragments; anti-protein antibodies circulating in the blood, which form immune-complexes with the food protein, and provoke the release of mediators which may cause multiple disturbances in all body systems, and even tissue damage. These circulating problems may also influence brain function in a variety of undesirable ways. There is vague circumstantial evidence of an adverse grain effect on metal status. A family history of psychiatric problems is more common in patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is genetically determined involving two or more concurrent genes. The genes involved are part of the immune-recognition complex, which determine the "Self" identity markers, protecting one's own cells from attack by the immune system. Celiac patients have an increased frequency of the serum histocomptability antigens (self-markers) of the HLA-B8 and HLA-Dw3 types. This genetic marker may indicate a predisposition for bowel absorption abnormalities or immunologic propensities, which result not only in celiac disease itself but other contingent abnormalities as well.
    Schizophrenia has been associated with gluten intolerance. The diagnosis, schizophrenia, describes a variety of differing individuals who belong to complex group of brain-disordered people. The schizophrenic brain distorts sensing, feeling, remembering, deciding, and acting. It is unlikely that schizophrenia is a single disease with a single cause. The milder, but similar brain dysfunctions which I observe commonly with gluten and other food intolerance, suggests that food allergy may play a role in schizophrenia, with gluten as a frequent triggering antigen. Dr. F.C.Dohan has consistently advocated a gluten-schizophrenia link for 20 years [Dohan, F.C., Cereals and Schizophrenia: Data and Hypothesis, 1966 Acta Psychiatr. Scand 42:125-42; Dohan, F.C. More, Celiac Disease as a Model for Schizophrenia, 1983 Biol. Psychiatry 18:561-4].
    Dr. Dohan states:
    [" Many diseases are caused by genetically-deficient utilization of specific food substances. Perhaps the best studied example is phenyketonuria... far more common disorders, for example, atherosclerosis, and coronary heart disease, are strongly suspected of being due to genetically defective utilization of certain food constituents. " Similarly, considerable evidence indicates that the major cause of schizophrenia is the inborn inability to process certain digestion products of some food proteins, especially cereal grain glutens..."]
    Among Dr. Dohan's interesting an relevant recommendations is the idea of a "Gluten tolerance test". Such a test has not yet been developed, but is the sort of evaluation method that NP advocates in general. A gluten tolerance test could be initiated with routine evaluations before and after ingestion of grain foods. More sophisticated versions would measure gluten proteins and derived peptides in the blood, and would track the path of these molecules into organs, especially the brain. Finally the impact of these molecules would be evaluated by monitoring the function of the target organ in real time. I have been eager to do real-time monitoring of brain activity, topologically-computed in gluten-sensitive patients. These patients report changes in their PSYE, cognitive abilities, and emotional state which no researcher to date has documented objectively. The problem of adverse brain effects of molecules derived from food is a major under-recognized phenomenon of nutrition and molecular pathophysiology. Research in the next 10-20 years will, I am convinced, reveal a great deal about the extent, mechanisms, and importance of this consequence of eating to our mental status.
    Extracted from "Nutrition Therapy" by Stephen J. Gislason, MD
    For more information, please visit Nutramed's Web site at: http://www.nutramed.com/.

    Scott Adams
    Celiac disease is a permanent (lifelong) condition which affects genetically predisposed individuals who are exposed to gluten and related products from rye, barley and oats. Once the diagnosis has been confirmed there is absolutely no indication for periodically undertaking a gluten challenge. It is well known that patients with celiac disease who start ingesting gluten again after having been on a gluten free diet may go for years without apparently having any symptoms. Despite this there will be ongoing histological damage to the intestines. It was this apparent prolonged symptom free state that led doctors in the past to believe that people could grow out out of the condition. This is no longer accepted as correct.
    Dr. Ivor Dennis Hill left the University of Baltimore and is now in North Carolina. He is the Chief of the Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem. His new phone number is (910) 716 4431. As such he will be very involved in all aspects of Clinical Pediatric Gastroenterology. Dr. Hill has every intention of continuing his work with celiac disease and sees this as an opportunity to open another center of interest. Colleagues at Duke and Chapel Hill are keen to join Dr. Hill in a Pediatric Gastroenterology Group.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.