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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams
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    Celiac Disease Linked to Nearly Every Inflammatory Disorder

      Study links celiac disease to nearly every inflammatory disorder.

    Caption: Photo: CC--Brian

    Celiac.com 12/05/2017 - It's not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have other medical conditions, including liver disease, glossitis, pancreatitis, Down syndrome, and autism.

    By the same token, people with one or more of these associated disorders can be at greater risk for having or developing celiac disease. Until recently, though researchers didn't have much good data on the numbers behind those risk levels. A new database study of more than 35 million people changes that.

    The study found that, for example, people with autism have celiac disease at rates that are 20 times higher than those without autism. You read that right. People with autism are 20 times more likely to have celiac disease than people from the general population.

    Reporting on his team's findings at the World Congress of Gastroenterology 2017, lead investigator Daniel Karb, MD, a second-year resident at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, says that doctors who treat autistic patients may want to keep an eye out for celiac-like symptoms. "If you have a patient who is autistic and they have all these unusual symptoms, you might want to screen them for celiac disease," said Karb.

    Researchers have long known that people with celiac disease can present with unusual symptoms that fall outside the classic celiac symptoms of malabsorption, steatorrhea, malnutrition, abdominal pain, and cramping after eating, "but this is putting numbers to it," said Dr Karb.

    For their study, Dr. Karb and his colleagues searched the Explorys database, which aggregates electronic health record data from 26 major integrated healthcare systems in the United States. Combing through the records of 35,854,260 people in the database from 2012 to 2017, they found 83,090 celiac disease diagnoses.

    The investigators uncovered significant connections between celiac disease and 13 other autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. In fact, the team found that, except for a condition called primary biliary cholangitis, "[e]very autoimmune disease [they] looked at is associated with celiac disease," Dr. Karb reported.

    The study indicates that "there is a large undiagnosed burden of celiac disease," he explained. "And a lot of it is probably because of these atypical presentations."
    As research continues, look for more connections between celiac disease and other inflammatory conditions to be more fully detailed.

    For more on the World Congress of Gastroenterology 2017.

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    Guest AWOL Cast Iron Stomach

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    I've been waiting for this. I think many of us on the forum knew this news was coming. I am sure there is more to come.

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    The headline is misleading. In the article it states "[e]very autoimmune disease [they] looked at is associated with celiac disease." But then it doesn't say which other diseases they looked at. The list provided is but a fraction of those types of conditions. And, to equate "inflammatory disorders" and "autoimmune diseases" is also incorrect. Auto immune conditions could be said to all involve some degree of inflammation, but not all inflammatory disorders are auto immune; yet, the article seems to use the terms interchangeably.

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    The headline is misleading. In the article it states "[e]very autoimmune disease [they] looked at is associated with celiac disease." But then it doesn't say which other diseases they looked at. The list provided is but a fraction of those types of conditions. And, to equate "inflammatory disorders" and "autoimmune diseases" is also incorrect. Auto immune conditions could be said to all involve some degree of inflammation, but not all inflammatory disorders are auto immune; yet, the article seems to use the terms interchangeably.

    The article states very clearly some of the conditions the researchers looked into and, and associated with celiac disease. Here is the part you missed: "The investigators uncovered significant connections between celiac disease and 13 other autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, Crohn´s disease, and ulcerative colitis. In fact, the team found that, except for a condition called primary biliary cholangitis, "[e]very autoimmune disease [they] looked at is associated with celiac disease, Dr. Karb reported." You can bet they looked at the most common inflammatory conditions. Basically all of them.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/20/2014 - Researchers don’t have much data on rates of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). To better understand any connections between the two conditions, a Dutch research team recently set out to examine the rates of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis.
    Specifically, the team set out to investigate the relationship between AIH and celiac disease by assessing the prevalence of IgA tissue antitransglutaminase antibodies (TGA) and antiendomysium antibodies (EMA) in a large group of AIH patients.
    The research team N.M. van Gerven, S.F. Bakker, Y.S. de Boer, B.I. Witte, H. Bontkes, C.M. van Nieuwkerk, C.J Mulder, G. Bouma; and the Dutch AIH working group. They are variously affiliated with the Departments of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Medical Immunology at the VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    For the first step in their study, the team used TGA antibody serology to determine the frequency of celiac disease in a group of 460 AIH patients. The team conducted EMA screens on any patients showing TGA positivity.
    They then used digital and written medical records to collect retrospective data on previously diagnosed celiac disease and patient characteristics, and compared those findings with archival data on the prevalence of celiac disease in the Netherlands. They found that six patients had a known history of celiac disease, but were currently in remission, as shown by negative TGA blood screens.
    In addition, ten of the 460 AIH patients (2.2%) showed positive IgA TGA. Positive EMA antibodies in these patients served to confirm celiac disease diagnosis.
    Overall, the team found celiac disease in 3.5% of AIH patients compared with just 0.35% in the general Dutch population (P<0.001).
    Discounting patients with either a primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis overlap, the team found celiac disease in 11 (2.8%) AIH patients. This is the largest serological study to examine connections between AIH and celiac disease, and shows that patients with AIH have rates of celiac disease that are higher than those of the general population, but not as high as some studies have suggested.
    Still, the team advises doctors to consider the possibility of concurrent celiac disease in all AIH patients.
    Source:
    Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Oct;26(10):1104-7. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0000000000000172.

    Jefferson Adams
    Scientists Finally Know What Causes Celiac Disease!
    Celiac.com 08/19/2015 - For the first time since it was described and named by 1st century Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia, first linked to wheat in the 1940's, and specifically linked to gluten in 1952, scientists have discovered the cause of celiac disease.
    Professor Ludvig Sollid, and his team at the Centre for Immune Regulation at University of Oslo, have discovered that people with celiac disease suffer from one of two defective human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), which cause the immune system to see gluten molecules as dangerous, triggering the immune response that causes classic celiac-associated inflammation and other symptoms.
    To be true, the team was not working in the dark. They were armed with a complete map of the genes, an understanding that two types of HLA (HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8) predispose a person for celiac disease, and the very crucial recent discovery by a team of German colleagues that celiac patients have antibodies for a very precise enzyme: transglutaminase 2.
    "We also found that the bits of gluten that were presented to the T-cells have some changes caused by an enzyme in the body – transglutaminase 2", says Sollid. HLAs are proteins which act as markers, binding to fragments of other proteins, and telling T-cells how to treat them.
    So it wasn't much of a stretch for Professor Sollid's team to determine that the defective HLAs bind to fragments of gluten, causing the T-cells to treat them as bacteria or viruses.
    Basically, two HLA types present gluten remnants to the T-cells, causing the T-cells to regard the gluten as dangerous, and to trigger immune reactions that cause inflammation in the intestines, and this is what causes celiac disease.
    "We think that this is huge," Sollid said. "We understand the immune cells that are activated and why they are activated."
    At present, Professor Sollid and his group are investigating how antibodies against transglutaminase are formed.
    This is a simple, but huge moment in the annals of medicine and in the annals of celiac disease. It's a discovery that will help researchers develop new approaches to treatment, and/or a cure for celiac disease in the future.
    Source:
    Med.uio.no

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/09/2015 - Can mass screening for celiac disease help enough people, and improve enough lives to justify the cost and effort?
    While celiac disease fulfills several WHO criteria for mass screening, such as high prevalence, available treatment and difficult clinical detection, it remains unproven that treatment of asymptomatic celiac disease can lower the risk of severe complications and improve quality of life, or that it is cost-effective.
    A research team recently set out to review the literature on screening for celiac disease in relation to the current World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for mass screening.
    The team included Jonas F Ludvigsson, Timothy R Card, Katri Kaukinen, Julio Bai, Fabiana Zingone, David S Sanders, and Joseph A Murray.
    The research team is variously affiliated with the Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden, the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK, the School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland, the Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland, the Department of Internal Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland, the Department of Medicine, C Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina, the Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy, the Regional GI and Liver Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK, the Department of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, USA.
    The team conducted a PubMed search for all indexed papers on celiac disease screening published from 1900 until mid-2014. For all relevant abstracts the team read the corresponding paper in full.
    Their search revealed that current evidence is not sufficient to support mass screening for celiac disease.
    However, they do note that this strategy will help most patients with celiac disease, so active case-finding may be appropriate.

    They also note that, even though proof of benefit is lacking, screening for celiac disease may be appropriate in high-risk groups.

    Source:
    United European Gastroenterology Journal April 2015 vol. 3 no. 2 106-120

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/21/2015 - For people with celiac disease, gluten immunogenic peptides might reveal whether you've been bad or good on your gluten-free diet, and whether or not you have gut damage.
    In fact, the best way to spot transgressions in the gluten-free diet and incomplete mucosal healing in people with celiac disease might just be to check for gluten immunogenic peptides in their urine.
    For people with celiac disease, the presence of gluten immunogenic peptides in the urine indicates a break in the gluten-free diet, along with incomplete mucosal healing.
    How do we know this? Because available methods to determine gluten-free diet adherence couldn't detect occasional gluten ingestion that may cause gut mucosal damage, a team of researchers recently set out to develop a method to assess gluten intake, monitor gluten-free diet compliance in celiac patients, and to correlate those results with mucosal damage.
    The research team included María de Lourdes Moreno, Ángel Cebolla, Alba Muñoz-Suano, Carolina Carrillo-Carrion, Isabel Comino, Ángeles Pizarro, Francisco León, Alfonso Rodríguez-Herrera, and Carolina Sousa. They are variously affiliated with the Facultad de Farmacia, Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain, with Biomedal S.L., Sevilla, Spain, with Unidad Clínica de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío in Sevilla, Spain, with Celimmune, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, and with Unidad de Gastroenterología y Nutrición, Instituto Hispalense de Pediatría, Sevilla, Spain.
    For their study, the research team collected urine samples of 76 healthy subjects and 58 patients with celiac disease subjected to different gluten dietary conditions. To quantify gluten immunogenic peptides (GIP) in solid-phase extracted urines, the team used a lateral flow test (LFT) with the highly sensitive and specific G12 monoclonal antibody for the most dominant GIP, along with an LFT reader.
    They found that, in healthy individuals previously subjected to a gluten-free diet, GIP were detectable in concentrated urines as early as 4–6 hours after single gluten intake, and remained detectable for 1–2 days. The urine assay revealed deviation from a gluten-free diet in about 50% of the patients.
    Analysis of duodenal biopsies showed that nearly 90% of celiac patients with no villous atrophy had no detectable GIP in urine, while all patients with measurable GIP in urine showed incomplete intestinal mucosa recovery.
    GIP are easily detected in urine after gluten consumption, enabling a new and non-invasive method to monitor gluten-free diet compliance and deviation. The method was sensitive, specific and simple enough to be convenient for clinical monitoring of celiac patients, as well as for basic and clinical research applications, including drug development.
    Such tests could be very useful for both doctors and patients looking to monitor gluten-free dietary progress and gut healing in people with celiac disease, to say nothing of research and treatment development.
    Source:
    Gut, 25 November 2015. doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2015-310148

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    Rinsing it off under running water real good, this is to get any CC off. Examples, if there is a open air bakery some flour might have settled on your produce at the grocery store. OR if they are giving out samples some person might have been handling a dounut and touched your produce. Rinsing it off under running water works to remove any trace amounts normally.

    Organic. some people in general react to stuff used in growing produce, IE glyphostphate, or like me I have a issue with the wax they coat them with to keep the fresh. Going organic or farmers market fresh helps some with these. I think your nutritionist is covering all the bases.
    Global Gluten Free Beer market report provides complete analysis with current ... Rise in Obesity, Diabetes, Celiac Disease, Other Diagnosed Food ... View the full article
    Thank you GFinDC. Question. When you say, "quick rinse", can you define what is safe for us to use when washing our fruits and veggies? I know that might sound like something I should know but I am seriously taking no chances (at least not on purpose). I've been buying organic produce because I was told I needed to. Do you find that to be true or do I need to find a new nutritionist? 😉
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