Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Latest Topics

  • 0

    Celiac Disease Statistics

    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 06/26/2007 - Celiac disease is one of the most common chronic health disorders in western countries. It is also one of the most under-diagnosed. Up until ten years ago, medical schools taught that celiac disease was relatively rare and only affected about 1 in 2,500 people. It was also thought to be a disease that primarily affected children and young people. Recent studies and advances in diagnosis show that at least 3 million Americans, or about 1 in 133 people have celiac disease, but only 1-in-4,700 is ever diagnosed.

    The National Institutes of Health shows the prevalence of celiac disease to other well-known conditions as follows:

    • Celiac Disease affects 3 million Americans
    • Epilepsy affects 2.8 million Americans
    • Crohns Disease affects 500,000 Americans
    • Ulcerative Colitis affects 500,000 Americans
    • Multiple Sclerosis affects 333,000 Americans
    • Cystic Fibrosis affects 30,000 Americans

    People with untreated celiac disease suffer intestinal damage when they eat products containing wheat, rye, or barley. The disease mostly affects people of European (especially Northern European) descent, but recent studies show that it also affects portions of the Hispanic, Black and Asian populations as well. Celiac disease presents a broad range of symptoms, from mild weakness and bone pain, to chronic diarrhea, abdominal bloating, and progressive weight loss. In most cases, treatment with a gluten-free diet leads to a full recovery from celiac disease. It is therefore imperative that the disease is quickly and properly diagnosed so it can be treated as soon as possible.

    If people with celiac disease continue to eat gluten, studies show that their risk of gastrointestinal cancer is 40 to 100 times that of the normal population. In addition to increased cancer risk, untreated celiac disease is associated with osteoporosis, and a two-fold increase in the risk of fractures, including first-time hip fractures. Moreover, an unusually high percentage of people with celiac disease suffer from the following related conditions (% in parenthesis):

    In fact, untreated celiac disease can actually cause or worsen some of these conditions, and medical guidelines now recommend celiac screening for all people with these conditions.

    The vast majority of people visit doctors who have been in practice for more than ten years, and for whom celiac disease is a rare condition and often not considered when handling complaints. Seniors are also more likely than the general population to suffer from conditions associated with celiac disease (Arthritis, Diabetes, Liver Disease, Osteoporosis, etc). Without awareness and screening, they are at greater risk for developing disorders resulting from celiac disease--many of which are avoidable with diagnosis and treatment. Awareness of celiac disease and related issues offers seniors and easy way to improve their health and wellbeing.

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest Karen Fine

    Posted

    Excellent article and updated statistics from the National Institute of Health.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Nal Suresh Pai

    Posted

    Article does not mention effects of celiac disease on the brain (depression,ADHD, etc.)

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Alex Meaney

    Posted

    Thank you so much for having this website up, I am doing a big project on how celiac disease is a massive public health issue and this website has helped so much with statistics and general information!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Edmund

    Posted

    Article does not mention effects of celiac disease on the brain (depression,ADHD, etc.)

    Totally - I also am curious if ADHD link is more recent or not.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Estelle

    Posted

    While I understand that 1 in 133 is the "accepted" number it will GREATLY increase awareness.

    If the number is actually UPDATED to reflect the correct percentages...1 in 75 vs. 1 in 133.

     

    They also "accepted" that the world was flat! LOL...

    It is time for new data to support the gluten-free labeling measures!

    Since the "data" being used to support this is well over 25 YEARS old.

    (These were the EXACT same numbers used when I was diagnosed 25 years ago!)

     

    It is just as misconceived that you can not be a celiac unless your "skinny" .

    In order to further this cause in labeling awareness NEW data should be involved.

    As it is indeed more prevalent as we are seeing with more people being "finally" diagnosed

    daily. The number of these cases support this new data!

    Thus showing and supporting the need for CORRECT labeling.

    As well as new symptom "guidelines" need to be in-acted by the AMA so it does

    NOT take 10 years on average to be diagnosed. ( Thank goodness for you and your center!)

     

    Using out dated numbers is NOT furthering the cause as it has still taken 25 years.

    To even get a labeling initiative had the numbers been Correct and up to date this would have

    indeed been in effect years ago! It is time for all Celiac awareness groups to get together on this.

    Submitting data that shows that this is indeed just as prevent in many ways as other conditions.

    The higher the actual numbers the better the response and support for your program as well as other programs in the country.

     

    Kind regards,

     

    Estelle

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Thank you so much for having this website up, I am doing a big project on how celiac disease is a massive public health issue and this website has helped so much with statistics and general information!

    I am too and I honestly believe this was the best article I read. Lots of useful information!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Bill D

    Posted

    It's hard to get good tasting gluten-free food. Better labeling would be a help.The quantity and quality of gluten-free food is improving as more of us are being properly diagnosed. Six years for my finding.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Hilary

    Posted

    Excellent article and updated statistics from the National Institute of Health.

    It would be very helpful if you would reference your articles so that original sources of the information could be followed up.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Carol

    Posted

    Somewhat helpful - somewhat misleading. From my readings, I do not believe there is a "full recovery from celiac disease." Symptoms can be relieved and absent yet the damage to the small intestines is never repaired. It is imperative to be diagnosed and, then if you have celiac disease, eliminate all foods with gluten forever. There is, to date, no cure.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

×