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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS


    admin

    Celiac.com 02/08/2007 - There are no signs or symptoms typical for all people with celiac disease. Signs and symptoms and can vary greatly from person to person.


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    People with celiac disease often have general gastric complaints, such as intermittent diarrhea, abdominal pain and bloating. Some people with celiac disease, however, suffer no gastrointestinal discomfort at all.

    To make matters of diagnosing celiac disease even more challenging, celiac symptoms can also mimic symptoms of other conditions, such as anemia, Crohns disease, gastric ulcers, irritable bowel, parasitic infection, even various skin disorders or nervous conditions.

    It is not uncommon for celiac disease to present itself with symptoms that are far more vague. Such symptoms can include: dental and bone disorders (such as osteoporosis), depression, irritability, joint pain, mouth sores, muscle cramps, skin rash, stomach discomfort, and even tingling in the legs and feet (neuropathy).

    Celiac disease results in malabsorption of nutrients.

    Depending on the degree of malabsorption, the signs and symptoms of celiac disease vary among individuals, ranging from no symptoms, few or mild signs and symptoms, to many or severe signs and symptoms. There are two categories of signs and symptoms:

    Signs and Symptoms of Malabsorption, Malnutrition, Vitamin and/or Mineral Deficiencies Associated with Celiac Disease:

    • Abdominal cramps, gas and bloating
    • Borborygmi (stomach rumbling)
    • Coetaneous bleeding
    • Diarrhea
    • Easy bruising
    • Epistaxis (nose bleeding)
    • Failure to thrive
    • Fatigue or general weakness
    • Flatulence
    • Fluid retention
    • Foul-smelling or grayish stools that are often fatty or oily
    • Gastrointestinal symptoms
    • Gastrointestinal hemorrhage
    • Hematuria (red urine)
    • Hypocalcaemia/ hypomagnesaemia
    • Iron deficiency anemia
    • Lymphocytic gastritis
    • Muscle weakness
    • Muscle wasting
    • Nausea
    • No obvious physical symptoms (just fatigue, overall not feeling well)
    • Pallor (unhealthy pale appearance)
    • Panic Attacks
    • (nerve damage)
    • Stunted growth in children
    • Vertigo
    • Vitamin B12 deficiency
    • Vitamin D deficiency
    • Vitamin K deficiency
    • Vomiting
    • Voracious appetite
    • Weight loss
    • Obesity

    Conditions and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease:

    Lastly, Dermatitis herpetiformis is an itchy, blistering skin disease that also associated with gluten intolerance. Rashes usually occurs on the elbows, knees and buttocks. Dermatitis herpetiformis can also cause significant intestinal damage identical to that of celiac disease. However, people who suffer from Dermatitis herpetiformis may also be entirely free of noticeable digestive symptoms. Treatment with a gluten-free diet, in addition to medication to control the rash, usually brings about significant improvement.

    Edited by admin


    Image Caption: Image: CC--Nick Spacee
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    Recommended Comments

    Guest Kaya Merrill

    Posted

    I have all the symptoms except for osteoporosis, and I am not a child. Thanks, Kaya.

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    Guest Penrose

    Posted

    After surviving rectal cancer, chemotherapy, radiation, an ileostomy, an ileostomy take down; food allergies - particularly to Gluten it seems - have worn me down to a frazzle and made me incredibly sick. Am undergoing testing for celiac disease and hope for the best. Thanks for the information.

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    Guest Robert Beebe

    Posted

    I was completely unaware that such a disease even existed. I have all of the symptoms! The treatment seems easy enough, which would be a good diagnostic tool. Thank you. B. Beebe

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    Guest beverly lees

    Posted

    I think that it is wonderful that there is this kind of information to the public, I myself have a rash and when I read about this I quit all bread and cereals, and my rash went away , thank you very much..

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    There is a last and final symptom and that is non Hodgkin's lymphoma cancer. That was how I found out that all my childhood pains and indigestions and such were directly linked to celiac disease. I went over and beyond gluten intolerance. My pathology book informed me of the final result after I'd done chemo and radiation. Go figure. lol

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    This site has been a god send. I am a physician struggling with this disease and multiple other food allergies. It is nice to know that I, as a medical professional, do not feel as if I have to come up with all of my own answers. This disease definitely has been education for me in so many ways. Please keep the information and articles coming. By the way anyone looking for a great physician in Boston, I have been a patient of Dr. Catherine Cheney's for a while and she is top notch!

     

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    Guest Carles Ramos

    Posted

    Yes, you are right. Thanks for the info. I've got nine out of ten symptoms of the list and a few more: regular rashes of candidiasis, insomnia, hemorroids and last one, maybe related maybe not, bladder cancer.

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    Guest Vanda

    Posted

    I broke out 15 years ago and no one could tell me what was wrong. I broke out again last spring still no answers. My oldest daughter has been having problems and was diagnosed with celiac disease and was told it is hereditary. My youngest is also having the same symptoms so I will be scheduling an appointment to find out if I have celiac disease.

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    Guest Helen Jordan

    Posted

    I got on to this site, my daughter has all these symptoms,

    will follow up on this.

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    Guest stacey

    Posted

    Thanks for the info my son is 18 months old and has been in and out of hospital 4 the last six weeks he has quite a few of the symptoms you have said my son is being tested for celiac and he is on iron supplements - I am quite convinced that he has got it.

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    Guest Linda

    Posted

    How in God's name do you get through to people that this is NOT a joke, it's NOT just a tummy ache, and it's NOT in your head? As if I would be wasting time & money eating such a bloody expensive & inconvenient diet! Thanks for the DDX list. By the way, for some of us, it's severe constipation w/severe inflammation and other fun things like fistulas.

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    Thank You for the informative information. I am now raising 4 grandchildren on my own (son deceased) and have found out that 2 of the children need to be on this diet. I hear how expensive it is and don't know how I am going to be able to accomplish all I need to for their benefit, but having this site for information and resources is a God send. Looking forward to trying some of the recipes.

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    THANKS FOR THE GOOD, CLEAR EXPLANATION. It is important to also mention non = celiac gluten sensitivity, as there are many more conditions that are caused by gluten consumption, including the many auto-immune diseases. New ones are being added to the list, such as Narcolepsy and even Parkinson's. Cutting out the consumption of gluten (wheat, barley and rye) can lead to healing and resumption of a normal life. Spread the word, support the research!

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    Guest RANJINI NAICKER

    Posted

    my son was diagnosed with lupus 14 years ago, I have just started the gluten free diet with extreme difficulty, any help would be welcomed. Thank you and kind regards.

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    Guest Robyn Russell

    Posted

    Another symptom no-one has mentioned is how it can affect the brain and make it impossible for the person to control anything they say and do after eating gluten. I know as this is how it affects my daughter. ADD no, OCD no, but she got very angry three hours after eating gluten. She also has the stunted growth.

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    Guest Maria Miron

    Posted

    I have all the symptoms except osteoporosis and instead of loosing weight I am a fat woman. Thanks Maria

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    Guest Raenette

    Posted

    Thanks for all this information. My husband has been to see a person calling himself a Naturopath, who looked into his eyes, and then declared him to be gluten-intolerant. My husband has none of the above symptoms, so I'm feeling reassured that I needn't go through the hassle of buying gluten-free products, when I'm trying to raise 4 kids on a restricted budget! We tried it for a week, but it's really very hard to keep up with if it's not really necessary.

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    Guest Marlene Magness

    Posted

    After reading your article, I intend to see my gastroenterologist for testing. I seem to have some of the symptoms of glucose intolerance. He recently tested me for lactose intolerance and found me to be highly lactose intolerant.

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    Guest Doug Merson

    Posted

    I have been working with my gastroenterologist for several years trying to diagnose my condition. She finally determined that my gallbladder needed to be removed, however my celiac symptoms got worse after that. My whole family has converted to a gluten free diet. For the most part things are working out for the better, but I still have the intestinal problems and overall fatigue even after 8 hours or more of sleep.

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    Guest D Super

    Posted

    After suffering with different things over the years I was recently tested for Celiac, which I will not received the results until next week, in order for the test to be accurate I had to eat a wheat and Gluten diet for at least 10 days before the test. I have not had wheat in my diet for the last 3 years. I started off with a few symptoms, headaches, gas, bloating, rash, needing to clear throat a lot, heart palpitations etc; What concerned me the most was as the days went on I was so fatigued could hardly get out of bed, my mind and motor skills slowed way down and got very fuzzy, was not able to make important decisions and certainly unable to drive. After eating pancakes with my daughter one morning we were talking and all of a sudden I wasn't able to form certain words. That was so very scary. I don't really need the results to tell me I have a problem with wheat and gluten, other than it being hereditary, and needing to know for sure. It frightens me to think so many people have this and will never know. They , meaning people and their doctors treat the symptoms and not the culprit. Thank you for all the information, I'm sure I will need it. Take Care and God Bless!

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    Guest Amber

    Posted

    I have had trouble with being overweight since I was a child. I am 20 yrs old now and weight 300. I get sick after I eat almost always. I get pains in my stomach , gas , or diarrhea. I also have dermatitis on my scalp. Been told several times its the way I eat, but after reading I think I could possibly have this. On another site someone mentioned boils. Have any of you experienced this? I have had issues with this myself. All in all this is a very informative site . Thank you

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    I've had diarrhea for about 10 years. My temperature is always 97. Something instead of 98.6. I was sick at home one day and googled about low body temperatures and it said many times people with a gluten allergy run low temperatures..I immediately got off gluten and I have felt much better and my intake of Immodium is seldom instead of every day. Thanks for the website. I refer to it almost everyday for information.

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    I have suffered for years with what was diagnosed as IBS. I have almost all the symptoms in your article & more & after many many visits to the doctors over the years I have at last got a doctor who has had the decency to get me checked out properly. I am awaiting the results & hoping that the ignorance of my prior doctor hasn't caused it to have gone too far. I suggest that anyone suffering these conditions don't let their doctor fob them off as I have been for at least 15 years. The only difference I have to the symptoms in this article is that I gained weight and cannot get it off no matter what diet or exercise I do.

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    Robyn, So glad to read your comment. I knew it was not my imagination. My 16 year old has all the signs and her pediatrician thinks I'm crazy. She also has the joint and muscle pain, Mostly low back pain. I will continue to get the answers I need. Thank you!

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    admin

    CELIAC DISEASE SCREENING

    By admin, in Celiac Disease,


    Celiac.com 02/08/2007 - For anyone with a family history of celiac disease or of disorders such as thyroid disease, anemia of unknown cause, type I diabetes or other immune disorders or Downs syndrome, doctors may suggest routine screening. Otherwise, patients are generally screened on a case by case basis according to individual symptoms.
    People with celiac disease have abnormally high levels of associated antibodies, including one or more of the following: anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium and anti-tissue transglutaminase, and damage to the villi (shortening and villous flattening) in the lamina propria and crypt regions of their intestines when they eat specific food-grain antigens (toxic amino acid sequences) that are found in wheat, rye, and barley.
    Antibodies are the specialized proteins the immune system uses to break down and eliminate foreign substances from the body. In people with celiac disease, the immune system treats gluten as a foreign invader and produces elevated levels of antibodies to get rid of it, causing symptoms and associated discomfort.
    Testing & Diagnosis
    A blood test, such as anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibodies, can detect abnormally high antibody levels, and is often used in the initial detection of celiac in people who are most likely to have the disease, and for those who may need further testing.
    Since the immune system of a person with celiac treats gluten as a foreign substance and increases the number of antibodies, elevated levels of these antibodies are a sign of celiac disease.
    To confirm the diagnosis, your doctor may need to do a biopsy, that is, microscopically examine a small portion of intestinal tissue to check for celiac associated damage to the small intestine. To do this, your doctor inserts a thin, flexible tube (endoscope) through your mouth, esophagus and stomach into your small intestine and takes a sample of intestinal tissue to look for damage to the villi (tiny, hair-like projections in the walls the small intestine that absorb vitamins, minerals and other nutrients).
     

    Dr. Scot Lewey
    Celiac.com 04/24/2008 - Genetic tests for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are readily available. Testing can be performed on either blood and mouth swab samples. If the testing is performed by certain laboratories not only will you have quite an accurate prediction of your risk of Celiac disease but also you may have information about the statistical probability that your children will inherit the risk, your likelihood of more severe Celiac disease, whether one or both of your parents had the risk gene, and for some laboratories you may determine your risk of gluten sensitivity without Celiac disease.
    The absence of any portion of the high-risk genetic patterns DQ2 and DQ8 nearly excludes the possibility of celiac disease with an approximate accuracy of 99.9%. However, there is a big caveat about relying on "negative celiac genetic testing". To definitively declare you have negative celiac genetic tests requires that the laboratory test for and report the presence or absence of the entire HLA DQ genetic pattern, including both alpha and beta subunits. The DQ genetic patterns DQ2 and DQ8 have two subunits but some laboratories only test for the beta subunit. This DQ typing is complicated and difficult to understand even by physicians and scientists. I have written an updated detailed review that appears in the Spring 2008 issue of Scott-Free newsletter published by celiac.com.
    Data collected by Dr. Ken Fine of Enterolab has supported the well-known fact that the absence of DQ2 and DQ8 does not exclude the risk of being gluten intolerance or sensitive though it now generally believed that one or both of those genetic white blood cell patterns are required to develop the autoimmune disorder known as Celiac disease or Celiac Sprue. However, there is a new study that reports that being negative for DQ2 and DQ8 does not completely exclude the possibility of celiac disease, especially in men. Previous studies have well documented blood test negative Celiac Sprue, also more common in elderly men with long-standing severe disease. Since DQ2 or DQ8 is almost universally present with the specific blood tests tissue transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibodies are present it is not surprising that individuals without DQ2 or DQ8 that are negative for these two blood tests are being reported that meet criteria for Celiac disease.
    These new studies are also providing further information that the genetics of Celiac is gender specific. If you are a man, your risk of celiac disease may be higher than a woman if you don't have the classic genetic patterns. Again, in this situation your blood tests may be negative. If you are a woman, the risk for Celiac disease is generally higher than a man, especially if you have received the at risk gene from your father instead of your mother.
    Celiac is arguably the most common autoimmune disease. It is very common. It is easily treated. It affects 1/100 people worldwide. However, most people with celiac disease (~90%) are unaware, undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Most adults finally diagnosed with celiac disease have suffered at least 10-11 years and have seen more than 3 or more doctors. Genetic testing is not only available but can be extremely helpful in determining your risk of developing Celiac disease, how severe it may be and the risk of your family members. Don't be one of those whose diagnosis is missed or needlessly delayed for over a decade. Get tested! Learn about the genetic tests for Celiac disease and if necessary educate your doctor about this testing.
    Here are ten facts you should know and remember about Celiac genetic testing.

    Genetic testing can help determine your risk as well as your children's risk. Celiac genetic tests can be done on blood or a mouth swab sample but your doctor may be unaware of the tests, not know how to order them, or know how to interpret the results. Genetic testing is not affected by diet. You can be eating gluten or on a gluten free diet. Blood tests for celiac disease antibodies, however, need to be done while eating gluten. They can become negative within a few weeks of restricting gluten so if you are going to get the diagnostic antibody blood tests don't begin a gluten free or restricted diet before being tested. Some insurance companies do not for the Celiac genetic test and almost all who do require pre-authorization first. The following diagnostic codes are helpful when requesting insurance coverage: 579.0 (Celiac disease); V18.59 (family history of GI disease); and/or V84.89 (genetic susceptibility to disease). Some laboratories do not perform the all of the necessary components of the test to completely exclude the possible genetic risk of Celiac disease and most don't test for or report the other gluten sensitive DQ patterns. Before you accept that have a negative test you need to know if your test included both the alpha and beta subunits of HLA DQ or did they just perform the beta typing. In some rare individuals, especially some men, a negative genetic test may not exclude the possibility of celiac disease anymore than a negative blood test. Men more commonly have negative genetic tests and blood tests, especially older men with long-standing severe disease. Both the DQ type, and number of copies you have, matter when determining not only your risk but also the possible severity of celiac disease. Two copies of DQ2 carries more risk than one copy of DQ8 or only partial DQ2. Even a single copy of DQ2 alpha subunit ("half DQ2 positive") carries risk for celiac disease but most of the commonly used laboratories for Celiac genetics do not test for or report the presence of this component of the celiac genes. The absence of at risk genes DQ2 and/or DQ8 does not exclude the possibility of being gluten intolerant or sensitive. You may respond to a gluten free diet even if you don't have DQ2 or DQ8 or true autoimmune Celiac disease. You can get genetic testing without a doctor's order and the tests can be done without having blood drawn or insurance authorization if you are willing to pay between $150-400 (www.kimballgenetics.com and www.enterolab.com). Laboratories in the U.S. that are known to offer complete alpha and beta subunit genetic testing include Kimball Genetics, Prometheus, and LabCorp. Bonfils, Quest and Enterolab only test for the beta subunit portions and therefore their test can miss part of a minor alpha subunit that carries a risk of Celiac disease. A negative DQ2 and DQ8 report from these labs may not necessarily be truly negative for the risk of Celiac disease.
    References and Resources:
    HLA-DQ and Susceptibility to Celiac Disease: Evidence for Gender Differences and Parent-of-Origin Effects. Megiorni F et al. Am Journal Gastroenterol. 2008;103:997-1003. Celiac Genetics. Dr. Scot Lewey. Scott-Free, Spring 2008.


    Dr. Rodney Ford M.D.
    Celiac.com 10/22/2008 - This article appeared in the Autumn 2007 edition of Celiac.com's Scott-Free Newsletter.
    The Gluten Syndrome refers to the cluster ofsymptoms that you experience if you react to gluten.  Gluten can affectyour gut, your skin, and your brain.  It applies to any reaction thatis caused by gluten.  It includes celiac disease, along with the myriadsymptoms that can be experienced throughout your gastro-intestinaltract in response to gluten.  It also includes many other symptoms thatdo not stem from your gut.  These include brain and behavior disorders,irritability and tiredness, skin problems, muscular aches and pains andjoint problems.
    The effects of gluten are wide ranging and arenow brought together under the term Gluten Syndrome.  In mostinstances, a simple blood test (the IgG-gliadin antibody test) canidentify those people who are affected.  
    10% Affected by Gluten
    TheGluten Syndrome affects about one in ten people.  However, most peoplewho are affected are unaware that their life is being hindered bygluten.  The gluten symptoms are most likely to be caused by damage tothe nerves and brain.  The earlier the problem is identified, thebetter the response to a gluten-free diet will be.
    Tummy Pains and not Growing
    Jontiis 3 years old.  His gluten story is typical.  His mother brought himto see me because she was concerned about his poor growth, and hisdistressing abdominal pains.  His blood tests showed a high gluten test(His IgG gliadin was 94 units.  This test result is usually less than15 at this age).  Other tests, including the gene test for celiacs,showed that he did not have celiac disease.
    I suggested that hego on a gluten-free diet.  Within days he began to eat better, and histummy pains went.  He is now growing again on a gluten-free diet.  Hismum wrote:
    “I really haven’t found the gluten-free diet thatdifficult.  I found people to be incredibly helpful actually, both inthe supermarket and in restaurants.  In the supermarket there is a lotof normal type food that is gluten-free and it is all clearly labeledthat it is gluten-free.  Even if you go to the delicatessen departmentthey will tell you which luncheon sausage is gluten-free.  There aregluten-free sausages all labeled and it’s normal food that tastes great.
    Forthe baking mixes and bread mixes, you don’t even have to go to thespecialist health food shops.  I go to no other shops other than thesupermarket to get food for him and I haven’t really found it thatdifficult.”
    Amazed how Jonti has Adapted
    Ihave been amazed, actually, by how easily Jonti has adapted to thegluten-free diet.  I tell him it is special food for him and that itwon’t hurt his tummy.  We have got nice biscuits from a bakery and heis allowed to choose which one he wants for morning tea.  He still hasnormal foods like chips and sweets.  He is not missing out and theother biscuits he hasn’t even really asked for.  The only thing is thebread!  I have yet to perfect the making of the bread.  Toast is aboutthe only thing he asked for.  You can get specialist cornflakes andcereals, porridge he loves, again, at the supermarket.  It has beensurprisingly easy actually
    I’m so pleased that he is now well again.  Gluten-free has made such a huge difference.”
    The Main Points:

    The Gluten Syndrome refers to the cluster of symptoms that youexperience if you react to gluten.  It can affect your gut, skin andnerves. Medical practitioners accept that gluten causes celiac disease(gut damage) but often resist the notion that gluten can cause a widerspectrum of illness. Celiac disease, gluten intolerance and gluten sensitivity are all part of The Gluten Syndrome. Rapidly accumulating medical evidence shows that gluten is nowcreating a massive health problem throughout the Western world. However, woefully few people are aware of the catalogue of harm thatgluten is causing.  About one in ten people—that is millions ofpeople—are affected by The Gluten Syndrome. Gluten could be responsible for one-third of all cases of chronicillness and fatigue.  People suffering from these conditions arecurrently just tolerating their symptoms, unaware that gluten is theculprit.  This is because the link to gluten is not yet recognized bythe medical community. Gluten-containing products are being added to our food chain inincreasing amounts.  Our wheat is being engineered to have even highergluten content.  This gluten overload is occurring without ourcommunities being unaware of the harm that this is causing. Gluten can cause malfunctions of the brain and neural networks ofsusceptible people.  The incidence of mental, neurological and braindisorders is on the rise.  However, the diagnosis of gluten-sensitivityis seldom made. The community is already embracing the notion ofgluten-sensitivity.  More and more people are opting for a gluten-freelifestyle.  These people are looking for a term to identify theirillness.  Their search is over.  They have been affected by The GlutenSyndrome. A strong gluten-free movement is developing globally in responseto the knowledge that going gluten-free can be so beneficial to so manypeople.  What has been missing up until now is a name that captures thegluten problem.  The missing name is The Gluten Syndrome.

    Get Your Blood TestsThe Gluten Tests
    Glutenis a protein that is found in wheat grains.  This protein has a numberof components, one of which is called gliadin.  People who get sickfrom gluten are usually reacting to the gliadin component.  
    You are a Long Tube
    Tounderstand what the blood tests mean, first you need to know a littlemore about your immune system.  It is the job of your immune system toprotect you from the outside world.  It protects you from the invasionof microbes (viruses and bacteria), and it also protects you from thetoxins and poisons in the food that passes through your gut.  Your gutis a long tube inside you that travels from your mouth to your anus. This is your gastrointestinal tract, also called your bowel.  Eventhough it is inside your body, the contents of this tube are still onthe ‘outside’ from your body’s point of view.  Lots of your immunecells coat the skin (called the mucosa) of this tube and work hard toprotect you from anything that might prove to be harmful.
    Gluten (Gliadin) can be Toxic
    Gliadin,the toxic component of the gluten protein, is one such harmfulsubstance.  Your immune system defends your body strongly againstgliadin using weapons called antibodies and the gliadin is repelled. The outcome of your immune system’s fight against gliadin is theproduction of antibodies that are specifically targeted towardsgliadin: these are called anti-gliadin antibodies.
    Gliadin Antibodies
    Anti-gliadinAntibodies (commonly called the IgG-gliadin antibody) are weapons thathave been made specifically to fight against gluten in the diet. Remember, gliadin is a component of the gluten protein.  This antibodyis very sensitive.  It is made very specifically by your immune systemto fight against gliadin.  However, a high level of this antibody doesnot necessarily mean that you have any gut damage, so it is not veryaccurate in assisting the identification of patients with celiac gutdamage.  On the other hand, tests for this antibody are nearly alwaysstrongly positive in people with celiac disease who are not on agluten-free diet.  Once people are placed on a strict diet, theseantibodies will fall to normal levels within a period ranging from fewmonths to a year or two.
    Gluten Tests Not Getting Done
    Thereis a problem.  Unfortunately, this gluten blood test (the IgG-gliadinantibody test) is no longer available from most communitylaboratories.  This year many laboratories have decided to discontinuethis test.  Their opinion is that it is worthless (for detecting celiacdisease).
    I disagree with their decision.  My latest data shows thathuge numbers of people remain undiagnosed with serious symptoms becauseof the misinterpretation of this gluten test result.  At the moment itis difficult to get the medical labs to do your gluten test.  They areunwilling to consider that gluten causes a wide spectrum of illnessthat has been written up in the international medical literature.  Theyhave turned a blind eye to the problem.  If you can’t test for glutenreactions, then you will not be able to make the diagnosis!
    A Diagnosis at Last!
    Mandywrote this letter to me: “Hi Dr Rodney Ford, for many, many, years Ihave been to doctors complaining of a bloated tummy, extreme crampingpains, and diarrhea (to the point I had no time to get to the toilet). I have recently had some blood test for celiacs done by my GP.  Myresults showed: the tTG was negative; and the IgG-Gliadin resultstrongly positive.  He could not explain it to me, but he said that Idid not have celiac disease.”
    “I have no idea what these testsmean.  Although I got no answers, I had to try something.  I was at theend of my nerves!  My bad health has always been upsetting my socialand working life.  I often have to rush home to the toilet.”
    Amazing on a Gluten-free Diet
    “SoI decided to try a gluten-free diet!  I have now been gluten-free for amonth.  It is amazing! Already I feel like a different person!  No morebloating, just the odd stomach cramp.  Also, all my headaches havegone.  But I still feel really tired and not sure how to overcomethis.  Can you help me please by explaining my blood test results—andshould I have anymore tests?  What else I can do to help myself?   Ihope you can help me Dr Ford.  Gluten, up to now, seems to have made mylife a misery.  Even though I feel so much better already, I want toget even better.  Kind regards, Mandy.”
    The Gluten Syndrome
    Ireplied: “Thanks.  I am glad that you are feeling a lot better offgluten.  From your story and your blood test results, you havegluten-sensitivity.  You do not have celiac disease (your low tTG levelshows that you do not have any gut damage from gluten).  But you arestill getting sick from gluten (your high IgG-gliadin level shows thatyour body reacts to gluten).  The good news is that it takes manymonths to get the full benefits of a gluten-free diet.  I expect thatyou will continue to feel better over the next few months.  You shouldbe taking some additional iron and a multivitamin supplements becauseyou will be relatively iron deficient—that will be making you tired.”
    The Time has Come
    Thehistory of science and medicine is littered with vehement argumentsagainst any new idea that runs contrary to traditional beliefs. Ironically however, it takes new ideas to make progress.  It was GeorgeBernard Shaw who said that “The reasonable man adapts himself to theworld: the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world tohimself.  Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”
    Thousands Convinced
    Manypeople are joining the ranks of the gluten-free.  There are thousandsof people like you who have read this information and who are concernedabout how gluten might be affecting them; there a millions of peoplewho are sick and tired of being ignored and who are looking for moreenergy and vitality; there are the practitioners in the field ofcomplementary medicine who are aware of the concept ofgluten-sensitivity; there are the laboratories who have developed thegliadin antibody test and know that their tests are specific for glutenreactions; there are the gluten-free food manufacturers who haverecognised that there is an ever-increasing demand for gluten-freeproducts; there are the networks of people in the health food industrywho appreciate the value of high-quality food and a gluten-free diet;and there are the supermarkets and grocery stores that are sensitive tothe demands of their customers.
    Who Might Oppose this Trend?
    Aspreviously discussed, medical practitioners are wary of overturningtradition.  They do not want to be seen as alternative and want toavoid acting outside of the recommended clinical guidelines.  Inaddition, there are the grain-growers and the bread-makers who maketheir living from gluten, and the pharmaceutical companies who maketheir living from the sick and unwell.  
    Bad Behavior on Gluten
    Kimberleyis 12 years old.  She has The Gluten Syndrome and her behavior getsdisturbed with gluten.  She does not have celiac disease but she doeshave a high gluten test.  (Her IgG-gliadin level was 55 units—It shouldbe less than 20.)
    Her mum said: “It is interesting about howbehavior troubles are linked to gluten!  Our youngest, Kimberley, isnow 12 years old.  She had her IgG-gliadin measured and it was high. She was clearly a lot better when she was off gluten.  However then shedecided to ‘try’ gluten again.  Rodney suggested a small amount but shewent for it—big time!”
    By the end of a week, two other parentshad asked what was wrong with her.  Another parent asked “what onearth’s the matter with her” she seemed so different and stroppy.  Sheadmitted she felt “absolutely awful” but really didn’t want to admit itas she knew it meant she’d have to completely give up gluten.”
    Anyway,after a lot of talking, she agreed it wasn’t in her best interests toeat gluten.  From that day she has been gluten-free ever since, withthe odd very long envious glance at French bread!  With our supportshe’s very compliant with being gluten-free now, which I think is remarkable forher age.  Clearly she now understands and gets the benefits of gluten-free.  ButI was really shocked at how affected her behavior was after areintroduction of gluten.”
    Could You Have The Gluten Syndrome?
    Onein every ten people is affected by gluten.  If you have chronic symptom(feeling sick, tired and grumpy) then you should get checked for TheGluten Syndrome. 


    Jennifer Arrington
    I would hate to add up all the hundreds of dollars I have wasted trying to get healthy.  Now, however, I get healthy by focusing on one thing:  making my intestines healthy.  If my intestines are healthy, I can absorb food.  If I can absorb food, my body will be receiving the nutrition it needs to function, and thus I will be healthy.
    Of course, rule number one for all of us is to stay gluten free.  But, focusing on avoidance alone, can get depressing.  Instead, I like to focus on what I can do to strengthen my digestive system.  That way, all the good gluten free food I am consuming can actually benefit my body.  What good is eating healthy if you are unable to absorb the nutrients?  Pouring healthy food into a compromised gut would be as wasteful as pouring dollar bills over an ATM machine and hoping in vain to strengthen your bank account balance.
    Research shows that those of us with celiac disease/gluten intolerance often have decreased absorption despite following a strict gluten free diet.  Scott Adams summarized one of these articles on the celiac.com website back in 2003.  The article by Lee SK, et al. entitled “Duodenal Histology in Patients with Celiac Disease after Treatment with a Gluten-free Diet” implied that even though patients may feel better on a gluten-free diet, there may still be damaged intestinal areas that are incapable of optimal nutrient absorption.  Since specific nutrients are absorbed along specific locations in the small intestine, this can have long-term ramifications.  For instance, the proximal portion of the intestine is the site for absorption of vitamin B6 (pyroxidine).  If that portion is damaged, there will be decreased absorption, and your body will be deficient in B6.  You may then experience a range of neurological symptoms such as nervousness, irritability, and shakiness.  And, as happened in my case, you may see a doctor, only to be told you are having anxiety attacks and be handed a prescription for a mild tranquilizer.  Thankfully, I discovered that a good B6 supplement (Solgar “Magnesium with B6”) was all I needed and threw away the offending prescription, but this serves as an excellent—albeit oversimplified—example as to why we have to focus on improving the health of our intestines.
    Before I go on, I do want to say that the products listed below do not benefit me financially in the least.  Additionally, these are the products that work best for my body.  You may find a different brand works better for you, but as long as our focus is on getting those intestines healthy, we are all heading in the right direction!
    So, read on about what I personally consider the top four intestinal healing supplements…
    The first and best all-round product I have found that truly aids in restoring the intestinal lining is a glutamine supplement put out by a company called Metagenics.  The supplement, called “Glutagenics”, contains glutamine, licorice root, and aloe vera.  While studying for my masters in nutrition at Texas A&M University, we learned that glutamine is a key amino acid that aids in restoring the intestinal lining in patients that are transitioning from being tube-fed to a normal diet.   So, when my own chiropractor suggested this supplement and mentioned it contained glutamine, I purchased it and have been taking it on and off for three years.  
    Glutagenics is available online through various websites that carry the Metagenics brand. The supplement is unfortunately a bit cost prohibitive, but you can shop around for other brands that contain a similar blend, or buy the three active ingredients separately. Unfortunately, this did not work for me (I have an expensive gut), but it may for you.
    The next product is a good omega-3 fatty acid. Omega-3 fatty acids have so many benefits that even if you weren’t working on building up your intestines, they would still be beneficial. During my graduate research, I was fortunate to be part of an ongoing study on the mechanism whereby omega-3 fatty acids reduce the inflammatory response. Obviously, when our intestines are damaged, there is plenty of inflammation. So, including omega-3 fatty acids in our diet is vital.
    Thankfully, omega-3 fatty acids are getting easier and easier to come by. My family eats the high omega-3 brand eggs and the Smart Balance peanut butter and butter spreads. You can also purchase wonderful oil blends by Nordic Naturals. My favorite is the lemon-flavored Omega-3 liquid. The lemon flavor truly masks the fishy taste and even my children swallow the oil with minimal grumbling. Nordic Naturals is quite expensive (around $20.00 for 8 oz) but if you compare the amount of DHA you are getting per serving, it is definitely the most DHA for your dollar!
    Another great healing nutrient is zinc. Zinc is wonderful for wound healing- you’ll see it in many topical creams, but it also helps restore the intestines. Metagenics puts out a great supplement and their products are great for sensitive individuals. I find that 10mg works best for me. I don’t take it every day – too much will give you a bad taste in your mouth. Once I get that bad taste, I know I need to go off it for awhile.
    Finally (for now), find a great probiotic. The one that everyone recommends, by Garden of Life, contains wheat grass, so we have to avoid it. I do extremely well, however, on a product called Lacidophil by Xymogen. My energy levels actually improve on this brand. Xymogen has their own website where you can purchase products directly. Taking a good probiotic restores a healthy balance to your gut flora, which aids in overall health and digestion. I have just recently ordered one from Emerson Ecologics through a natural doctor and it’s supposed to be even better. It has many more strains of the good bacteria so I’m going to try it as soon as it comes in.
    Of the four products listed above, the two that I take daily are the probiotic and omega-3 oil. The other two I take on an ‘as-I-need-it’ basis.
    Unfortunately, our bodies don’t tolerate a lot of extra supplements, so go slowly and only add one at a time. Keep track of how you feel. You may never tolerate the mass quantities that some companies will try to sell you. But, since you are your own best manager, work with yourself slowly and patiently and you will find your health improves over time.
    May God bless you with the wisdom and discernment you need to live a healthy and vibrant life!


    admin
    Celiac.com 04/09/2010 - Receiving a celiac disease diagnosis or being told you need to be on a gluten-free diet can be an overwhelming experience, and it is certainly not for the faint of heart. Most people get frustrated with the transition, and many don't know where to begin. While eating gluten-free can improve your health, I must emphasize that it is not recommended to attempt a gluten-free diet without a doctors supervision, as there are many potential health risks involved with making drastic changes to your diet, which can be avoided with assistance of a qualified doctor and/or nutritionist. If you suspect gluten-intolerance to be the culprit for your health problems, get examined by a doctor and get tested for celiac disease before initiating a gluten-free diet. It is very important to continually consume gluten while you are undergoing testing for celiac disease because many of the tests require you to be consuming gluten to get accurate results.
    Prescription: A Gluten-Free Diet
    Now that you have your diagnosis and need to eliminate gluten, you can make the transition to a gluten-free diet with confidence. The following information is a guideline of what you will need to know to get started. I must emphasize that this is only a guideline, and you will need to do your own research and consult with your doctor for more detailed information on a gluten-free diet. It is also a great idea to get involved in local support groups. Support groups will have members that understand what you are going through and they can help direct you to beneficial resources:
    Celiac Disease Support Groups, Organizations & Contacts Create New Habits
    To begin, if you are accustomed to doing things your own way, you will have to throw out many of your old habits. To avoid gluten poisoning you must keep all gluten away from your mouth. You will need to evaluate everything you ingest very carefully. Gluten can come in a variety of unexpected ways, including a kiss from a loved one, and any gluten that comes into contact with your mouth is a potential source of contamination. Cross-contamination can occur when a meal is prepared on cooking equipment shared with gluten-containing foods. It can also come from touching anything that has come into contact with gluten. It is therefore important to gluten-proof your house and to keep everything you eat separate from gluten and gluten residue. If you eat at restaurants, it is important to only eat at places that you know are safe. To help you avoid accidental gluten ingestion, please follow your instincts and use the following guidelines and avoid potential health hazards. Please remember that these are only guidelines--if you still have questions, please consult with a medical professional.
    What does "Gluten-Free" Actually Mean?
    Since gluten is found in wheat, rye and barley, it is obvious that you will need to avoid these grains. Less obvious however, are the myriad of products that contain gluten as a hidden ingredient. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently regulated the use of "gluten-free" on a food label, and there was already an FDA regulation that requires manufacturers to declare wheat if it is used as an ingredient in a product. Products that don't use "gluten-free" on their label unfortunately don't have to disclose ingredients that are made from barley or rye, which requires you to learn to read and understand ingredient labels. Many additives, natural or artificial, can contain gluten. Sometimes companies label products as "gluten-free" or the ingredients are naturally gluten-free, but the product may have be contaminated if it was manufactured on shared equipment. You will have to decide if you want to include such products in your diet. It is also important to remember, for reasons just mentioned, that “wheat-free” does not mean “gluten-free.”
    Batch Testing:
    According to current FDA proposals, products testing at less than 20 parts per million (PPM)  for gluten will likely be allowed to be labeled "gluten-free," and, according to them, are considered safe for people with gluten-intolerance or celiac disease. There are several organizations that offer gluten-free certification for companies who follow their guidelines and batch test their products. Check out the link below for more information on gluten-free certification and labeling.
    Gluten-Free Food Certification Program by the Gluten Intolerance Group Gluten-Free Shopping
    Shopping will likely take much longer for you than it used to. Don't rush. It is important to read all ingredients carefully. If you are in a hurry, you run the risk of overlooking a key ingredient that might contain gluten. I find it helpful to plan my meals in advance. There is nothing worse than coming home from work hungry and realizing that you have nothing to eat (and it isn't like you can go to the first drive-thru you find). So planning my meals on the weekend and doing my shopping in advance, cuts my stress level down considerably and keeps me from going hungry. Check your products against your gluten-free guidebooks, and contact the manufacturer if you are unsure about something. The following links will help you take the guess work out of shopping for gluten-free products:
    Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) As mentioned, there are also many products that are naturally gluten-free that are not labeled "gluten-free," and there are some very helpful books that can help you find these foods when you are shopping.
    A Gluten-Free Kitchen
    A gluten-free kitchen is very important. If you can have an entirely gluten-free kitchen, that is ideal, but it may not be an option for many households. Therefore it is especially important to keep your house clean and free of gluten contaminates.  It is also important to dedicate special kitchen supplies for gluten-free cooking. I bought a new cutting board that is dedicated only to gluten-free cooking. You may also want to have separate kitchen utensils such as sponges, toasters (a dedicated gluten-free toaster is highly recommended), sifters, bread machines, etc. This is especially important if you use utensils that are made of wood, plastic, or other porous materials that could harbor gluten and possibly contaminate your gluten-free food. If possible use an electric dishwasher to clean your dishes.
    If everyone in your household is going gluten-free it is important to clean out and empty all of the gluten products from your kitchen. If you share a kitchen with gluten eating family members, it is a good idea to store their food products separately from your gluten-free products, and to clean off all surfaces before you prepare your gluten-free food. Dedicating gluten-free cupboards and refrigerator shelves is a great way to start.
    Here are some important links that will help you cook gluten-free meals with ease:
    Gluten-Free Cooking Gluten-Free Recipes
    Kitchen Checklist - Possible Sources of Contamination:
    Bread-machine Toaster Sponges & cleaning pads All kitchen supplies & utensils Colanders Cutting boards Door handles Soaps For more information on maintaining a safe kitchen environment, click the link below:
    What You Need If You Can't Have A Gluten-Free Kitchen Dining Out Gluten-Free
    Dining out presents a challenge for most people on a gluten-free diet. Depending on your level of sensitivities, you may have difficulty eating out at all. Even if the restaurant offers a gluten-free menu, it is always important to find out what safety precautions the restaurant uses to avoid cross-contamination, and to make sure all the ingredients in your food are gluten-free. This may require you to modify your order, and also may mean talking with the chef about their kitchen practices. You may also benefit from utilizing a guide to safe restaurants.
    Here is an additional article that may be helpful to your situation:
    Take Charge of Your Meal When Eating Out A Gluten-Free Bathroom
    Believe it or not, your bathroom is another place where you might be getting sick from gluten contamination, and not even know it. There are many products in your bathroom to watch out for as many body products contain wheat and/or hidden gluten ingredients. Most celiacs can use body products without a negative reaction, though some people experience rashes and other unsavory reactions from gluten body products. However, if you are using face or body products that contain gluten, it is very important not to ingest them. I find it difficult to avoid getting shampoo or makeup near my mouth, so I don't take any chances. I use gluten-free soap, shampoo, conditioner, face-cleaner, toner, make-up, toothpaste; basically nothing goes onto my body that contains gluten. Using gluten-free body products allows me the freedom to worry less about accidental contamination, and gives me more time to enjoy my life. Many gluten-free body products are not labeled gluten-free, so it is important to read ingredient labels carefully and check with the manufacturer if necessary.
    Bathroom Checklist:
    Toothpaste Shampoo/conditioner Make-up Lip-stick, lip-liner, lip-gloss, cosmetics, etc. Lotion Sunscreen  
    Gluten-Free Medications (Prescriptions and Supplements)
    Most people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance also suffer from malabsorption and sometimes malnutrition. Your doctor may prescribe pain, anti-inflammatory, digestive or other medications or supplements to help assist with your recovery. It is very important to note that some medications and supplements can contain gluten. Do not assume that just because your doctor knows you have celiac disease or gluten intolerance that the medications or supplements they may prescribe for you are gluten-free.  Be your own advocate and read the ingredients and contact your pharmacist and/or the manufacturer and find out if your prescriptions, vitamins and supplements are gluten-free.
    Gluten-Free Medications List Additional Concerns
    Children with Celiac Disease
    Raising children with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance is no easy feat. Your kids will have to deal with immense  peer pressure and there will be a great deal of temptation for them to eat gluten-containing foods. Talk to the staff at their school and help them to understand your child's special needs. The more support you have, the better off your child will be. There are many support groups that advocate for children with celiac disease, and it is important to get involved and learn everything you can to help support your child.
    Raising our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K) Support Group Pets
    Your pets present another source of potential contamination, especially if you have pets like mine that love to smother you with unexpected kisses, sometimes on the mouth. What your pet eats can affect you too. Handling your pet's food, cleaning your pet's dishes and having young celiac children in a house where they may eat dog or cat food are all legitimate concerns. I decided to switch my pets to gluten-free pet food. Most pet food is not labeled gluten-free, so it is important to read ingredients carefully. I found grain-free, all natural pet food to be a great alternative to gluten-containing pet foods, that way I don't have to worry about accidental contamination or getting kisses from my pets--and it's healthier for them too!  It is also important to check all other pet products that you come into contact with for hidden gluten ingredients, like shampoos and soaps. It is of course always important to talk to your veterinarian before making any dietary changes for your pet.
    Other Food Sensitivities
    Most people who begin a gluten-free diet experience almost immediate relief from their symptoms. However, many people experience gluten-like reactions to other foods, and often suspect that their food was contaminated by gluten. As it turns out, many people who experience such reactions may in fact have additional food sensitivities. Some of the most common food sensitivities include, dairy/casein, soy, corn, sugar, nuts, shell-fish and processed or fatty foods. While many people report that they are able to add these foods back into their diet after they have established a gluten-free diet for many months, and after their intestines have had time to heal, it is up to you and your doctor or nutritionist to determine which foods may be causing you trouble. The 'elimination diet' is often recommended for determining what additional food sensitivities you may have. Ask your doctor if the elimination diet is right for you.
    Food Diary
    It is important to keep a food diary, especially when first initiating a gluten-free diet. Making notes of the foods you eat and the reactions you have to the foods you eat, and how you feel that day, can give you more insight as to which foods are hurting you and which foods your body can easily digest.
    Final Thoughts
    Be Picky
    Having a gluten intolerance means taking pride in your body, but not being too proud to say, "no, thank you." Don't worry about appearing too picky to others, you simply can't take care of yourself and worry what others think of you at the same time. You have the right to eat what you want; if something doesn't look, smell or taste right to you, or if you just don't feel right about eating something, don't eat it! It is better to come across as too finicky, than to spend the night in the bathroom or worse yet, the emergency room. Everyone has a different level of gluten sensitivity and you will have to find out through trial and error what works best for you.
    Be Prepared
    As a former Boy-Scout, my high-school teacher used to always say, "Be prepared".  I cannot emphasize enough the importance of this statement. It is important to be prepared and think ahead. Keep gluten-free snacks on hand at all times, because you never know when you are going to get hungry somewhere that doesn't offer gluten-free food. Keep shelf-stable snacks in your car, office, purse, and anywhere you spend time. It is better to have gluten-free snacks on hand, then to get hungry and make a bad decision to eat something you might later regret.

    Gluten-Free Quick-Check:
    Read all labels carefully Call the manufacturer whenever necessary Avoid cross-contamination at all times Keep your hands clean Check personal-care products for hidden gluten Check all vitamins, supplements and RX prescriptions for hidden gluten Make sure your pets are gluten-free Maintain a food diary Get involved-join a support group Rule of thumb-if you think it's possibly contaminated, don't take any chances. It's better to go hungry than to suffer later. Above all, trust your body Additional Resources:
    Gluten-Free Forum Celiac Disease Support Groups Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com

    admin
    WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects around 1% of the population. People with celiac disease suffer an autoimmune reaction when they consume wheat, rye or barley. The immune reaction is triggered by certain proteins in the wheat, rye, or barley, and, left untreated, causes damage to the small, finger-like structures, called villi, that line the gut. The damage occurs as shortening and villous flattening in the lamina propria and crypt regions of the intestines. The damage to these villi then leads to numerous other issues that commonly plague people with untreated celiac disease, including poor nutritional uptake, fatigue, and myriad other problems.
    Celiac disease mostly affects people of Northern European descent, but recent studies show that it also affects large numbers of people in Italy, China, Iran, India, and numerous other places thought to have few or no cases.
    Celiac disease is most often uncovered because people experience symptoms that lead them to get tests for antibodies to gluten. If these tests are positive, then the people usually get biopsy confirmation of their celiac disease. Once they adopt a gluten-free diet, they usually see gut healing, and major improvements in their symptoms. 
    CLASSIC CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS
    Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, upset stomach, bloating, gas, weight loss, and malnutrition, among others.
    LESS OBVIOUS SYMPTOMS
    Celiac disease can often less obvious symptoms, such fatigue, vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, to name a few. Often, these symptoms are regarded as less obvious because they are not gastrointestinal in nature. You got that right, it is not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms. That makes spotting and connecting these seemingly unrelated and unclear celiac symptoms so important.
    NO SYMPTOMS
    Currently, most people diagnosed with celiac disease do not show symptoms, but are diagnosed on the basis of referral for elevated risk factors. 

    CELIAC DISEASE VS. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE
    Gluten intolerance is a generic term for people who have some sort of sensitivity to gluten. These people may or may not have celiac disease. Researchers generally agree that there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. That term has largely replaced the term gluten-intolerance. What’s the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity? 
    CELIAC DISEASE VS. NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (NCGS)
    Gluten triggers symptoms and immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Gluten can also trigger symptoms in some people with NCGS, but the similarities largely end there.

    There are four main differences between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity:
    No Hereditary Link in NCGS
    Researchers know for certain that genetic heredity plays a major role in celiac disease. If a first-degree relative has celiac disease, then you have a statistically higher risk of carrying genetic markers DQ2 and/or DQ8, and of developing celiac disease yourself. NCGS is not known to be hereditary. Some research has shown certain genetic associations, such as some NCGS patients, but there is no proof that NCGS is hereditary. No Connection with Celiac-related Disorders
    Unlike celiac disease, NCGS is so far not associated with malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, or a higher risk of autoimmune disorders or intestinal malignancies. No Immunological or Serological Markers
    People with celiac disease nearly always test positive for antibodies to gluten proteins. Researchers have, as yet, identified no such antobodies or serologic markers for NCGS. That means that, unlike with celiac disease, there are no telltale screening tests that can point to NCGS. Absence of Celiac Disease or Wheat Allergy
    Doctors diagnose NCGS only by excluding both celiac disease, an IgE-mediated allergy to wheat, and by the noting ongoing adverse symptoms associated with gluten consumption. WHAT ABOUT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) AND IRRITABLE BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)?
    IBS and IBD are usually diagnosed in part by ruling out celiac disease. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome are sensitive to gluten. Many experience celiac disease-like symptoms in reaction to wheat. However, patients with IBS generally show no gut damage, and do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin and other proteins as do people with celiac disease. Some IBS patients also suffer from NCGS.

    To add more confusion, many cases of IBS are, in fact, celiac disease in disguise.

    That said, people with IBS generally react to more than just wheat. People with NCGS generally react to wheat and not to other things, but that’s not always the case. Doctors generally try to rule out celiac disease before making a diagnosis of IBS or NCGS. 
    Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease share many common symptoms, though causes are different.  In Crohn’s disease, the immune system can cause disruption anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, and a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease typically requires more diagnostic testing than does a celiac diagnosis.  
    Crohn’s treatment consists of changes to diet and possible surgery.  Up to 10% of Crohn's patients can have both of conditions, which suggests a genetic connection, and researchers continue to examine that connection.
    Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Large Number of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Sensitive To Gluten Some IBD Patients also Suffer from Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS
    Diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult. 

    Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, proper diagnosis often takes years. A positive serological test for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. 
    But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and obvious symptoms. Also, researchers are developing accurate and reliable ways to test for celiac disease even when patients are already avoiding wheat. In the past, patients needed to be consuming wheat to get an accurate test result. 
    Celiac disease can have numerous vague, or confusing symptoms that can make diagnosis difficult.  Celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed by doctors. Read a Personal Story About Celiac Disease Diagnosis from the Founder of Celiac.com Currently, testing and biopsy still form the cornerstone of celiac diagnosis.
    TESTING
    There are several serologic (blood) tests available that screen for celiac disease antibodies, but the most commonly used is called a tTG-IgA test. If blood test results suggest celiac disease, your physician will recommend a biopsy of your small intestine to confirm the diagnosis.
    Testing is fairly simple and involves screening the patients blood for antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA), and/or doing a biopsy on the areas of the intestines mentioned above, which is still the standard for a formal diagnosis. Also, it is now possible to test people for celiac disease without making them concume wheat products.

    BIOPSY
    Until recently, biopsy confirmation of a positive gluten antibody test was the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. It still is, but things are changing fairly quickly. Children can now be accurately diagnosed for celiac disease without biopsy. Diagnosis based on level of TGA-IgA 10-fold or more the ULN, a positive result from the EMA tests in a second blood sample, and the presence of at least 1 symptom could avoid risks and costs of endoscopy for more than half the children with celiac disease worldwide.

    WHY A GLUTEN-FREE DIET?
    Currently the only effective, medically approved treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. Following a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms, promotes gut healing, and prevents nearly all celiac-related complications. 
    A gluten-free diet means avoiding all products that contain wheat, rye and barley, or any of their derivatives. This is a difficult task as there are many hidden sources of gluten found in the ingredients of many processed foods. Still, with effort, most people with celiac disease manage to make the transition. The vast majority of celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet see symptom relief and experience gut healing within two years.
    For these reasons, a gluten-free diet remains the only effective, medically proven treatment for celiac disease.
    WHAT ABOUT ENZYMES, VACCINES, ETC.?
    There is currently no enzyme or vaccine that can replace a gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease.
    There are enzyme supplements currently available, such as AN-PEP, Latiglutetenase, GluteGuard, and KumaMax, which may help to mitigate accidental gluten ingestion by celiacs. KumaMax, has been shown to survive the stomach, and to break down gluten in the small intestine. Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003, is an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. GluteGuard has been shown to significantly protect celiac patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. There are other enzymes, including those based on papaya enzymes.

    Additionally, there are many celiac disease drugs, enzymes, and therapies in various stages of development by pharmaceutical companies, including at least one vaccine that has received financial backing. At some point in the not too distant future there will likely be new treatments available for those who seek an alternative to a lifelong gluten-free diet. 

    For now though, there are no products on the market that can take the place of a gluten-free diet. Any enzyme or other treatment for celiac disease is intended to be used in conjunction with a gluten-free diet, not as a replacement.

    ASSOCIATED DISEASES
    The most common disorders associated with celiac disease are thyroid disease and Type 1 Diabetes, however, celiac disease is associated with many other conditions, including but not limited to the following autoimmune conditions:
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: 2.4-16.4% Multiple Sclerosis (MS): 11% Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: 4-6% Autoimmune hepatitis: 6-15% Addison disease: 6% Arthritis: 1.5-7.5% Sjögren’s syndrome: 2-15% Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: 5.7% IgA Nephropathy (Berger’s Disease): 3.6% Other celiac co-morditities include:
    Crohn’s Disease; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Chronic Pancreatitis Down Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Lupus Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Turner Syndrome Ulcerative Colitis; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Williams Syndrome Cancers:
    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (intestinal and extra-intestinal, T- and B-cell types) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma Esophageal carcinoma Papillary thyroid cancer Melanoma CELIAC DISEASE REFERENCES:
    Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University
    Gluten Intolerance Group
    National Institutes of Health
    U.S. National Library of Medicine
    Mayo Clinic
    University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/17/2018 - Could the holy grail of gluten-free food lie in special strains of wheat that lack “bad glutens” that trigger the celiac disease, but include the “good glutens” that make bread and other products chewy, spongey and delicious? Such products would include all of the good things about wheat, but none of the bad things that might trigger celiac disease.
    A team of researchers in Spain is creating strains of wheat that lack the “bad glutens” that trigger the autoimmune disorder celiac disease. The team, based at the Institute for Sustainable Agriculture in Cordoba, Spain, is making use of the new and highly effective CRISPR gene editing to eliminate the majority of the gliadins in wheat.
    Gliadins are the gluten proteins that trigger the majority of symptoms for people with celiac disease.
    As part of their efforts, the team has conducted a small study on 20 people with “gluten sensitivity.” That study showed that test subjects can tolerate bread made with this special wheat, says team member Francisco Barro. However, the team has yet to publish the results.
    Clearly, more comprehensive testing would be needed to determine if such a product is safely tolerated by people with celiac disease. Still, with these efforts, along with efforts to develop vaccines, enzymes, and other treatments making steady progress, we are living in exciting times for people with celiac disease.
    It is entirely conceivable that in the not-so-distant future we will see safe, viable treatments for celiac disease that do not require a strict gluten-free diet.
    Read more at Digitaltrends.com , and at Newscientist.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/16/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate whether alterations in the developing intestinal microbiota and immune markers precede celiac disease onset in infants with family risk for the disease.
    The research team included Marta Olivares, Alan W. Walker, Amalia Capilla, Alfonso Benítez-Páez, Francesc Palau, Julian Parkhill, Gemma Castillejo, and Yolanda Sanz. They are variously affiliated with the Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health Research Unit, Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology, National Research Council (IATA-CSIC), C/Catedrático Agustín Escardin, Paterna, Valencia, Spain; the Gut Health Group, The Rowett Institute, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; the Genetics and Molecular Medicine Unit, Institute of Biomedicine of Valencia, National Research Council (IBV-CSIC), Valencia, Spain; the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire UK; the Hospital Universitari de Sant Joan de Reus, IISPV, URV, Tarragona, Spain; the Center for regenerative medicine, Boston university school of medicine, Boston, USA; and the Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu and CIBERER, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain
    The team conducted a nested case-control study out as part of a larger prospective cohort study, which included healthy full-term newborns (> 200) with at least one first relative with biopsy-verified celiac disease. The present study includes 10 cases of celiac disease, along with 10 best-matched controls who did not develop the disease after 5-year follow-up.
    The team profiled fecal microbiota, as assessed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, along with immune parameters, at 4 and 6 months of age and related to celiac disease onset. The microbiota of infants who remained healthy showed an increase in bacterial diversity over time, especially by increases in microbiota from the Firmicutes families, those who with no increase in bacterial diversity developed celiac disease.
    Infants who subsequently developed celiac disease showed a significant reduction in sIgA levels over time, while those who remained healthy showed increases in TNF-α correlated to Bifidobacterium spp.
    Healthy children in the control group showed a greater relative abundance of Bifidobacterium longum, while children who developed celiac disease showed increased levels of Bifidobacterium breve and Enterococcus spp.
    The data from this study suggest that early changes in gut microbiota in infants with celiac disease risk could influence immune development, and thus increase risk levels for celiac disease. The team is calling for larger studies to confirm their hypothesis.
    Source:
    Microbiome. 2018; 6: 36. Published online 2018 Feb 20. doi: 10.1186/s40168-018-0415-6