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    Gluten Causes Brain Disease! By Prof. Rodney Ford M.B., B.S., M.D., F.R.A.C.P.


    Dr. Rodney Ford M.D.

    This article appeared in the Autumn 2006 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter.


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    Celiac.com 12/11/2006 - Yes, thats what I think. Gluten-sensitivity is a disease of your brain and nerves.

    The gluten puzzle
    I have come to this conclusion after studying the effects of gluten on my patients for over a decade. I am a pediatric gastroenterologist and allergist. I run a busy clinic for children and their parents. I have been increasingly concerned by the large numbers of my patients who are affected by gluten. I was perplexed by their wide-ranging symptoms. The puzzle was to explain how gluten could cause so much ill health to so many people in so many different ways, including celiac disease.

    Faulty brain control
    Eureka! The solution came when deep in discussion with my friend and colleague, Ron Harper, Professor of Neurobiology, UCLA. We were both struggling with the concept of multiple symptoms that needed to be explained. The answer appeared absurdly simple: disturbed "brain control". It suddenly seemed obvious—gluten could disturb the neural pathways of the body. Gluten was gradually damaging the brain and the nerves of susceptible people. It was the brain that was the common pathway for the manifestations of all of the gluten symptoms. So I set out to research what the world medical literature had to say.

    Is gluten a neurotoxin?
    I felt excited. I reviewed my patients in this new light—I began looking for a brain-grain connection. I began to see gluten as a neurotoxin—this could provide a universal model of gluten-sensitivity. This toxicity might act through inflammatory mechanisms or cross-reactivity with neurons. I began accumulating the evidence for my proposal that gluten-sensitivity is a brain and nerve disease.

    "Full Of It!"
    The concept of "Full of it" developed from the stories from my patients. I wrote my hypothesis down in a book now called Full of it! It refers to our diets being full of gluten; to the world being full of gluten-sensitive people; to the medical practitioners who are so skeptical of adverse reactions to gluten; to the enthusiasm of people who are feeling vibrant again on a gluten-free diet; and to those who are brimming with hope that the problem of gluten has now been recognized.

    Food allergy skeptics
    As a junior doctor I decided to formally research the food allergy phenomenon. I was awarded a research post and carried out the first comprehensive food allergy studies in New Zealand. I triumphantly demonstrated that food allergy was both a real entity and that it was common. But, to my disappointment, my colleagues were reluctant to believe me or my data. They professed a "disbelief" in food allergy. This surprised me as I had the research data.

    My next step was to conduct four more years of investigation of food allergy in Australia (at the Royal Childrens Hospital, Melbourne). This was a bigger and more elaborate study. My Doctoral Thesis (1982) based on this work is called: Food hypersensitivity in children: diagnostic approaches to milk and egg hypersensitivity. Since then I have continued my investigations into food allergy—but still today (25 years later) medical skepticism abounds. This "disbelief" is held despite the vast body of research describing food allergy. There seems to be an underlying unwillingness for doctors to consider food allergy as a possibility. Unfortunately, this also applies to gluten reactions.

    The shocking truth
    The shocking truth about gluten is that gluten foods are causing tremendous damage—but currently this is going mostly unrecognized. Unfortunately, gluten grains have become our staple diet. The quantity of gluten in our food supply has been steadily increasing. Yet worse, official Health Policies endorse gluten grains as the foundation of our food pyramid.

    Medics turn a blind eye
    Gluten is sapping the energy and wellbeing of countless millions. To date, the medical profession has turned a blind eye to glutens wider problems whilst focusing all of their attention on the narrow problem of celiac disease.

    A typical story
    I received emails like this every day:

    "Dr Ford, I have emailed you a number of times regarding our two children.

    I thought I should let you know that since going gluten free for the last three months, at last our son and daughter have put on some weight.

    If I had kept them on a normal gluten diet (which they recommended at the hospital) we would be still be having the headaches and sore tummies as well as the bad moods which our son would have. People just thought he was a naughty child, but now he is so different - we can talk to him without getting into any fights.

    I congratulate you for all your efforts on bringing gluten intolerance to the media and medical profession. More children and their families may find long awaited help. We have had to put up with this for seven years! At long last there is light at the end of the tunnel. Kind regards, Sue and Garry."

    Can gluten damage your brain?
    I believe that gluten was actually causing these two children to be sick. That is the explanation for their "naughty" behavior, their moods and their headaches.

    I postulate that gluten can damage your brain. I have come to this conclusion by the abundant circumstantial evidence from my observations of my patients who are gluten-sensitive. I have pondered the next questions: "Why do they have such an array of symptoms from gluten?" "Why do they recover so quickly when gluten is removed?" And "Why do they deteriorate so rapidly when only tiny amounts of gluten are eaten?" The concept of a brain/nerve disease can explain everything.

    The brain/nerve hypothesis
    "The symptoms from gluten occur through its action on the nervous system".

    I propose that gluten-sensitivity is a brain condition. Each and every organ in your body has some form of brain/nerve control. I propose that gluten can injure the delicate nervous networks that control your guts functions. A malfunction will subsequently lead to all of the gut symptoms that have so well been described. In addition, gluten can also directly affect brain function, which leads to the primary neurological symptoms that are so commonly seen with gluten-sensitivity.

    What is new?
    There are a number of new ideas that I put forward. These are based on circumstantial evidence. They produce a unifying theory of the symptoms that are attributed to gluten toxicity.

    • A brain disease
      I consider that gluten-sensitivity is mostly a neurological problem. A major contribution to this debate is the realization that the brain has a central role in the expression of the symptoms that have, until now, been attributed to the local toxicity of gluten in the gut.
    • A nerve disease
      I propose that gluten-sensitivity is a nerve disease. There is a gigantic network of nerves that controls every function that your gut is programmed to do. There are as many nerve cells in your gut as there are in your head! (about 25 billion nerve cells). I call it your tummy brain (or gut brain). Your tummy brain can be directly damaged by gluten reactions. This is the cause of so many sore tummies and bowel troubles.
    • A wide spectrum of neurological manifestations
      For decades, there have been reports of unexplained brain and nerve symptoms which are associated with celiac disease. Although these associations have been described, there has been no universal mechanism proposed. However, if gluten is seen as a neurotoxin, then the explanation has been found.
    • A very common disease
      Reactions to gluten have recently been documented to be extremely common. About one-in-ten people (as ascertained by blood donor studies) have high levels of gluten antibodies in their blood. My clinical studies have arrived at this same high number of gluten-sensitive people. Others have data to show that it is even more prevalent.

    Am I full if it?
    You might ask, "Is he full of it?" Yes, I am full of excitement and hope for the future. So many people can now be helped, if only this information can be widely distributed. I am full of ideas and full of enthusiasm. I hope that you are full of hope for your healthy and vibrant future.

    Tariq's story:

    "Dear Rodney,


    Thank you for your care and support of my family in regard to our allergies, gluten sensitivity and celiac disease that exists within that framework.


    My son Tariq, who is nearly 12 years old, has been a patient of yours over a number of years for his multiple food allergies. Tariq also suffers from dyslexia. Over the last several years Tariq has been becoming increasingly tired, lacking in energy and motivation, struggling with school work and constantly scratching due to his eczema and rashes covering all of his body.

    During this time, even though he has attended soccer training up to four times a week he somehow gained a lot of weight. Tariq was constantly grumpy and had low mood levels.


    Two months ago you diagnosed Tariq with gluten-sensitivity (his tTG 4; IgG-gliadin 86; IgA-gliadin 9).

    Tariq was extremely reluctant to go on a gluten free diet. But as the rest of the family had gone gluten-free—so he was forced also to become gluten-free.

    The changes that a gluten-free diet has evoked in Tariq have been astounding. His energy levels have increased, his skin has vastly improved, he has lost a lot of his excess weight (even though his appetite has increased) and he has shown improvement in his dyslexia.

    Tariq is not as grumpy as he was and his mood levels have improved. Tariq is now vigilant about gluten and can see the differences it has made to his life and the quality of it.

    Also, the other soccer parents have noticed a vast improvement in Tariqs energy levels and speed. His teacher has also noticed a big difference.

    Thanks again.

    Regards, Rosemary"

    Are you affected?
    The shocking truth is that gluten can damage your brain and that so many people are being encouraged to eat gluten-foods that might be steadily eroding their health and energy. If you have any lingering doubt about your own health, then I suggest that you check out the possibility of gluten-sensitivity.

    If you have any comments or questions we would love to hear from you.

    Dr Rodney Ford is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist, Allergist and Nutrition Consultant. He has been Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Christchurch School of Medicine, University of Otago. He runs a busy Childrens Gastroenterology and Allergy Clinic in Christchurch, New Zealand. He has written over a hundred scientific papers including book chapters and books. www.doctorgluten.com

    This includes a series of five books on gluten: why it can make you ill and how to go gluten-free.

    • Are You Gluten-Sensitive? Your Questions Answered
    • Going Gluten-Free: How to Get Started
    • The Gluten-Free lunch book
    • The book for the Sick, Tired and Grumpy (Gluten-Free kids)
    • Full of it! The shocking truth about gluten (The brain-grain connection - ISBN 978-0-473-10407-8)

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    Hmm... the Roman 'bread and circuses' come to mind... Did the Romans see the connection and get their populace fat, dumb, and happy with gluten? Makes me wonder...

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    Guest Charleen Jones

    Posted

    The article was very informative and gave me something to go forward with. While I don't think that I'm a celiac, I do believe that I am gluten sensitive. I also believe this can be my husband's problem too. Thank You very much for this life changing information.

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    I am on the gluten free diet after about a year and a half of suffering from the symptoms of celiac disease. I have been diagnosed by a gastroenterologist as a celiac from several days of different tests to confirm this diagnosis. I am a new patient and have seen for myself and my family has seen this too, my symptoms have improved greatly. I have been on this diet for about two months now. I love it that I do see light at the end of the tunnel. I can now get back some of the energy, I do not have the symptoms of joint pain, vomiting or diarrhea, my skin has improved and most of all, I feel good. I am not completed well, but I am encouraged and know that this has a treatment that can help me. Thanks for hearing my story. S.

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    Guest Norm Gurr

    Posted

    A great article which shows the issue.

     

    I collapsed last Boxing Day after eating a large amount of cakes pies and bread on Christmas. The hospital thought I had all of the symptoms of a stroke. It was proved later that it was not that. Since then, I have spent almost a year in agony. My muscles developed cramps. My legs swelled up. I had heart rate attacks of 220 BPM and blood pressure attacks of up to 200 (separately and together). I developed rashes all over my body. I had bleeding through my skin. My legs swelled up. I developed skin like that of an alligator on my legs. I ended up hardly able to walk, even though I had been a 3 mile a day runner for 40 years. I had dizzy spells. I spent a total of two weeks in hospital undergoing tests by a number of specialists. It was determined that I also had perophral neuropathy. I was given up to 14 drugs in an effort to deal with the symptoms. But the doctors had no idea of the cause of all of this.

     

    A friend then told me she had had some of the symptoms I had and was cured by not eating gluten

     

    I laughed, but tried it. Guess what ? I am getting better week by week and all of my symptoms have either abated or have vanished . I am about to start my running again,

     

    Guess what? The doctors refused to believe that it was caused by gluten.

     

    How many others have what I have had to some degree, while the doctors say, 'We may never know the cause of the illness,' while blindly saying that there is no such thing.

     

    Yet medical experts all over the internet search engines around the world say there is this form of gluten sickness beyond the intestine type

     

    I have a challenge in life. It is to see that the doctors in Ontario accept that there is a second disabling if not deadly gluten sickness.

     

    And suggestion which will help me?

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    About a month ago, my daughter started having some strange symptoms. Along with her eczema, which she scratched to the point of bleeding, she started having a lot of unexplained pain. She is 2 1/2. She complained about toe pain, eye pain, and she was also having frequent tantrums daily. I was at my wits end. None of her doctors could tell what was wrong. They said she was fine, but I knew she was not fine. She also started having odd behavior. She seemed to not be able to control her motor functions of her hands. She would hold on to something with one hand and than use the other hand to try to pry the other hand off. This was very frustrating to her. I went to a naturopath doctor and she was diagnosed with having an allergy to gluten. I now have an appointment with the allergist specialist to verify this. I am not waiting around though. I have taken her off the gluten and she has changed dramatically. I am just learning about gluten-free foods so sometimes there is a slip up and she regresses, but overall, she is pleasant, no more tantrums, and her skin is better. Reading your article made so much sense to me. It helped me realize why she was having such strange behavior. Gluten being a brain disease is an obvious answer to me. I feel so relieved to have an answer. I am so glad I did not take her to a behavior specialist.

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    Dr. Richard Becker says that gluten is a toxin. I believe it to be true. We have a first hand experience with Celiac Sprue from Grandmother, mother, husbands cousins and on and on. Keep up the good work as it is important to all.

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    Guest Johnny Wang

    Posted

    Doctor,

     

    The missing piece of this puzzle is gluten ---> glutamate release. Wheat in particular is full of other glutamate precursors, not just gluten.

     

    Glutamate excitotoxicity (like toxicity from monosodium glutamate ingestion) ---> acetylcholine release ---> histamine ---> inflammation. Brain fog, autoimmune issues, and more will crop up along any step of these pathways. The process is seen pretty clearly in asthma, where magnesium (directly antagonizes glutamate/CA++ overflow) is given intravenously in dangerous attacks, causing rapid bronchodilation.

     

    Glutamate excitotoxicity ---> prolactin release ---> dopamine antagonism.

     

    etc.

     

    Good luck!

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    Guest Barbara Frohne

    Posted

    I'm so excited to learn about the brain connection. I think we are going to be able to get my mother some help!

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    Guest Diane

    Posted

    Brilliant article, good on you Dr. Ford for your great work that is no doubt saving peoples lives, making them well and happy again, and for challenging the some medical beliefs. I may add that countless children are no doubt being put on dangerous mind altering drugs for a so called ''ADHD'' and 'ADD,' or for just being naughty, the side effects just add to their behavior problems and sickness. I believe Gluten or food allergy intolerance is the cause with some.

    We are in the process of getting our children gluten tested.

    Since coming to see you with my daughter amelia, the result is amazing, she is progressing wonderfully thanks to you Rodney.:-) Cheers

    Diane Blakemore.

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    Guest Waller McInnes

    Posted

    I am 5 days gluten free and for the first time in my life I can see straight!!!

    For 10 years, I was bulimic, and then so-called anorexic, despite eating as much as possible. I constantly felt as if I was being attacked when I sat down to eat. I was depressed, angry, anxious and could barely smile.

    I have been studying the healing properties of food for many years, every day struggling to find foods that agreed with my system. The one glutenous food I was hanging onto was shoyu soy sauce, and now that I have given it up, the pain in my body, diabetic and epileptic symptoms are diminishing, my body is registering the food it is taking in and the anxiety is greatly reduced!

    I am so excited about what lies ahead. Thank you for sharing this powerful article. I know for sure the gluten sensitivity and possible celiac caused me 27 years of severe angst--the word needs to get out there BIG TIME!

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    Guest Ann Jones

    Posted

    I was diagnosed at 50, my son at 40. I was a nervous teen and could not read aloud in front of my class and knew the fear and self consciousness was not normal even though I was told that I was a beautiful girl. My son in his teens became ill and hard to get along with hot tempered and stressed. He developed neuropathy and diagnosed without stomach problems. My sister lives in a small town with nerve problems, diabetes and now stomach problems. Her doctors won't test her for Celiac. You are right!

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    Guest Linda Michaels

    Posted

    Animal feed has soy and gluten containing grains, the reason it is better to buy 100 percent grass fed beef and wild fish and raw organic butter made from 100 percent grass fed cattle.

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    Guest Candice

    Posted

    Please tell everyone about this. I was recently diagnosed after years of being misdiagnosed. Now my body has so much damage done they don't know how soon I'll begin to feel well. I am glad that I know what is wrong now, but I do feel angry that years of my life have been stolen because of the incredible lack of knowledge about this disease.

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    How do you convince a doctor to write a script to test for celiac when your doctor is not convinced your symptoms are related?

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    Guest Tony Gooch

    Posted

    I can vouch for this, I have had mental problems since the age of ten (am now sixty three) and only discovered gluten to be the problem two years ago.

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    Guest Shelly

    Posted

    I can vouch for this, I have had mental problems since the age of ten (am now sixty three) and only discovered gluten to be the problem two years ago.

    My heart goes out to you! I am grateful for what you wrote here Tony, because you got me thinking that maybe my aunt (my mom's sister) who had mental illness (now deceased) could of had celiac disease. Then there is my sister who's dealing with mental illness and living on the streets of CA :( and wants no help for anyone. Then when I think of my mom I see that she is a little bit off and could never drink milk and has other symptoms the fit celiac disease. Her mom and other members on her side too had problems of mental illness. Sadly so far I am the only one that was diagnosed with celiac disease back in 1996 and didn't know until a week ago how serious this celiac disease is because the doctor didn't tell me. UGH!!!!! I been told I have Fibromyalgia, Lupus, Arthritis...and the list goes on. No mention from my new doctor about celiac disease, I will bring it up next month when I see him that should be interesting, since he has my 1996 results in his file and never once mentioned the celiac disease just other things they found with me like mono. You really got me thinking that all along with my mom's side of the family it's just been celiac disease! Thanks again!

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    Guest Rodney

    Posted

    My heart goes out to you! I am grateful for what you wrote here Tony, because you got me thinking that maybe my aunt (my mom's sister) who had mental illness (now deceased) could of had celiac disease. Then there is my sister who's dealing with mental illness and living on the streets of CA :( and wants no help for anyone. Then when I think of my mom I see that she is a little bit off and could never drink milk and has other symptoms the fit celiac disease. Her mom and other members on her side too had problems of mental illness. Sadly so far I am the only one that was diagnosed with celiac disease back in 1996 and didn't know until a week ago how serious this celiac disease is because the doctor didn't tell me. UGH!!!!! I been told I have Fibromyalgia, Lupus, Arthritis...and the list goes on. No mention from my new doctor about celiac disease, I will bring it up next month when I see him that should be interesting, since he has my 1996 results in his file and never once mentioned the celiac disease just other things they found with me like mono. You really got me thinking that all along with my mom's side of the family it's just been celiac disease! Thanks again!

    Hi Shelly

    Thank you, and thanks to everyone else for your insightful comments. The more I look at the evidence of gluten and neurological harm, the more I am concerned to leave children eating gluten if they are susceptible to gluten reactivity. I have the privilege of being invited to speak at a number of cities in the USA in Oct/Nov this year (2009). The topic is: “The Gluten Syndrome: a neurological diseaseâ€. See link: http://www.csaceliacs.org/Conferences/2009Presenters.php

    This is a huge subject, and a very worrying one. Again I appreciate the support and interest of the group. Cheers, Dr Rodney Ford.

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    I just found out that I have celiac disease but my GI doctor isn't convinced that it is true so I had to go through all of his tests because I am have hepititus as well. I've been on the gluten free diet for a week and see a very pronounced change. I thought I had low sugar because of a fainting spell at work and severe cramps in my legs. Yes I agree that this stuff IS a toxin and it has an effect on the brain as well as the rest of the body.

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    Doctor,

     

    The missing piece of this puzzle is gluten ---> glutamate release. Wheat in particular is full of other glutamate precursors, not just gluten.

     

    Glutamate excitotoxicity (like toxicity from monosodium glutamate ingestion) ---> acetylcholine release ---> histamine ---> inflammation. Brain fog, autoimmune issues, and more will crop up along any step of these pathways. The process is seen pretty clearly in asthma, where magnesium (directly antagonizes glutamate/CA++ overflow) is given intravenously in dangerous attacks, causing rapid bronchodilation.

     

    Glutamate excitotoxicity ---> prolactin release ---> dopamine antagonism.

     

    etc.

     

    Good luck!

    Can you explain the asthma/magnesium connection in more lay terms. I have gluten problems (deep sleeps) but also bronchial asthma. I have been taking magnesium for the heart palpitations I get after eating wheat or yeast. Should I stop ?

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    Wonderful site - I would like to be able to post a comment. Or ask a question - please tell me how. I have had celiac test that came back negative. But I have bad reaction to all grains, so would like tell people about this also.

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    Dr. Scot Lewey

    This article appeared in the Summer 2006 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter.
    Celiac.com 08/31/2006 - All of us have patterns of proteins on the surface of our white blood cells. These proteins are known as human leukocyte antigens (HLA), one of which is DQ. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), and several autoimmune conditions occur more frequently with certain HLA DQ types. DQ gene testing is performed by analyzing cells from a blood sample or from a Q-tip swab of the mouth. HLA types have a naming system that can be confusing even to scientists and physicians but here is my explanation of the testing, the results, and what they may mean to you and your family.
    Each of us has two copies of HLA DQ. Because there are 9 serotypes of DQ we are all DQx/DQx where x is a number between 1 & 9. For example, I am DQ2/DQ7. I received the DQ2 from one of my parents and the DQ7 from the other. Because we get one DQ type from each of our parents and give one to each of our children it is easy to to see how the DQ genes pass through a family. This is important because two DQ types, DQ2 and DQ8, are estimated to be present in over 98% of all people who have celiac disease, the most severe form of gluten sensitivity.
    Rarely, true celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, the skin disease equivalent of celiac, have been reported to occur in people who do not have DQ2 and/or DQ8. However, according to unpublished data from Dr. Ken Fine of Enterolab, the other six types, except DQ4, are associated with risk for elevated stool antibodies to gliadin, the toxic fraction of gluten, and/or tissue transglutaminase (tTG) an enzyme. Both of these antibodies are usually elevated in the blood of individuals with celiac disease though they may be normal in the blood of individuals who are gluten sensitive and have a normal small intestine biopsy but respond favorably to a gluten-free diet.
    Fine has publicly reported that elevated stool antibodies to gliadin and/or tTG have been detected in all of the untreated celiacs tested in his lab and 60% of non-celiacs who have symptoms consistent with gluten sensitivity but in none of the controls tested including cow manure. Follow up surveys of those individuals with elevated stool antibodies who initiated a gluten-free diet compared with those with elevated antibodies who did not reportedly showed significantly improved quality of life and improved symptoms in the gluten-free group.
    He also reported DQ2 and DQ8 positive individuals have had, as a rule, the highest elevations of stool gliadin antibody followed by those who are DQ7 positive. Only those who are doubly positive for DQ4 have not been found to have significantly elevated antibodies to indicated gluten sensitivity. This is consistent with the differences in prevalence rates of celiac disease seen in various parts of the world since DQ4 is not generally found in Caucasians of Northern European ancestry where celiac incidence is highest but in those from Asia or Southern Africa where there is a very low incidence of celiac disease and gluten intolerance.
    DQ2 & DQ8, the two major types present in 90-99% of people who have celiac disease, are present in approximately 35-45% of people in the U.S., especially those of Caucasian race of Northern European ancestry, with highest risk of celiac disease but the prevalence in U.S. of celiac disease is 1%. Though a prevalence of 1 in 100 is very common and much higher than had been believed for years, only a fraction of the genetically at risk are confirmed to have celiac disease by abnormal blood tests and small intestine biopsies. However, the number of people who report a positive response to gluten-free diet is much higher.
    The stool antibody tests results would support this and the concept of a spectrum of gluten sensitivity that is much broader and in need of better diagnostic definitions. I am an example of someone who is DQ2/DQ7 who has normal blood tests for celiac disease but abnormal stool antibody tests and symptoms that responded to gluten-free diet. The strict criteria for diagnosing celiac disease, which is abnormal blood tests and a characteristic small intestine biopsy showing classic damage from gluten, is much narrower than what is being seen clinically.
    It is becoming obvious to many of us who have personal and professional medical experience with gluten intolerance and celiac disease that the problem of gluten sensitivity is much greater and extends beyond the high risk celiac genes DQ2 and DQ8. Traditionally it is reported and believed by many that if you are DQ2 and DQ8 negative you are unlikely to have celiac disease or ever develop it, though this cannot be said with 100% certainty especially since there are documented cases of celiac disease and the skin equivalent of celiac disease, known as dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) in individuals who are DQ2 and DQ8 negative.
    Therefore, knowing your DQ specific serotype pattern may be helpful for several reasons. For example, if you have more than one copy of DQ2 or DQ8, you carry two of the major genes. For example, if you are DQ2/DQ2, DQ2/DQ8, or DQ8/DQ8, a term Scott Adams of www.celiac.com has dubbed a "super celiac" you may be at much higher risk for celiac disease and have more severe gluten sensitivity. Certainly if you are DQ2 and/or DQ8 positive you are at increased risk for celiac disease. After a single copy of DQ2 or DQ8, it appears that DQ7/DQ7 might be next highest risk. Dr. Fine has also noted some other associations of the DQ patterns with microscopic or collagenous colitis, neurologic manifestations of gluten sensitivity and dermatitis herpetiformis, which has been one of the gluten sensitive conditions noted to be, at times, occurring in DQ2, DQ8 negative individuals.
    Why some people get celiac Disease or become gluten sensitive is not well understood but certain factors are believed to include onset of puberty, pregnancy, stress, trauma or injury, surgery, viral or bacterial infections including those of the gut, medication induced gut injury or toxicity e.g. non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, etc., immune suppression or autoimmune diseases especially since several of those factors are associated with onset or unmasking of gluten sensitivity in someone who is at risk or not manifesting any recognizable symptoms. There is also well known group of individuals who are termed "latent" celiacs. They are at high risk because they have close relatives who have celiac disease with whom they share one or more of the celiac genes DQ2 and/or DQ8 though they usually have few or no symptoms but sometimes have abnormal blood tests and/or biopsies indicating possible or definite celiac disease. Others have negative blood tests and normal biopsies but symptoms that respond to a gluten-free diet.
    The severity of the sensitivity to gluten appears to be related to the DQ type, family history (highest risk is in the non affected identical twin of a celiac), pre-existing intestinal injury, degree of exposure to gluten (how frequent and large a gluten load an individual is exposed to), and immune status. Once initiated, gluten sensitivity tends to be life long. True celiac disease requires life-long complete gluten avoidance to reduce the increased risk of serious complications of undiagnosed and untreated celiac such as severe malabsorption, cancers, especially of the GI tract and lymphoma, other autoimmune diseases and premature death due to these complications.
    Again, DQ testing can be done with cells from blood or by a swab of the inside of the mouth but not all labs test for or report the full DQ typing but only the presence or absence of DQ2 and DQ8. The lab that performs DQ testing is usually determined by an individual insurance company on the basis of contracts with specific commercial labs. However, if your insurance contracts with Quest Labs or the Laboratory at Bonfils (Denver, CO) full DQ can be done if ordered and authorized by the insurance company.
    For those willing to pay out of pocket, Bonfils performs full DQ testing for Enterolab (www.enterolab.com) on a sample obtained by a Q tip swab of the mouth. Since it is painless and non-invasive it is well tolerated especially by young children. Also because the testing can be ordered without a physician and the sample obtained in their home using a kit obtained from Enterolab it is convenient. The kit is returned by overnight delivery by to Enterolab who forwards the test onto Bonfils. The cost is $149 for the genetic testing alone and has to be paid for in advance by credit card or money order and is generally not reimbursed by insurance.
    Enterolab also provides the stool testing for gliadin and tissue transglutaminase antibodies to determine if gluten sensitivity is evident. The gliadin antibody alone is $99 or the full panel includes genetic typing, stool testing for gluten and cows milk protein antibodies, and a test for evidence of malabsorption is $349.
    Again, the advantages of full DQ testing is determining if someone has more than one copy of DQ2 or DQ8 or carry both and therefore have a higher risk for celiac disease or more severe gluten intolerance. If you are DQ2 or DQ8 negative then your risk of celiac disease is low, though not non-existent. If you are not DQ4/DQ4 then you do have risk for gluten sensitivity. If you determine all DQ types within enough family members you can piece together a very accurate history of the origin of celiac and gluten sensitivity within a family and make some very accurate predictions of risk to other family members.
    Though the lay public and many clinicians are finding the genetic tests helpful, many, including most physicians, do not understand the genetics of gluten sensitivity. We are awaiting Dr. Fines published data on the significance of stool antibody tests and their association to the other DQ types as his lab is the only lab offering the stool antibody tests in the U.S. Other celiac researchers in U.S. have failed to reproduce his assay but scattered reports in the literature are appearing including a recent article in the British Medical Journal indicating stool antibody testing is feasible, non-invasive, and using their protocol, highly specific but not sensitive for celiac disease in children. (Editors note: When present, these antibodies indicate celiac disease. However, they are not present in many cases of celiac disease.)
    In the meantime, many patients are faced with the uncertainty and added cost of full DQ testing and stool testing due to the failure of traditional blood tests, small bowel biopsies, and the presence or absence of DQ2 and DQ8 to diagnose or exclude gluten sensitivity. Physicians unfamiliar with this testing are increasingly presented with the results and confused or skeptical pending published reports. The medical community continues to lack a consensus regarding the definitions of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and what tests justify recommendations for gluten-free diet. It is clear that gluten sensitivity, by any criteria, is much more common than ever thought and a hidden epidemic exists.
    Dr. Scot Lewey is a physician who is specialty trained and board certified in the field of gastroenterology (diseases of the digestive system) who practices his specialty in Colorado. He is the physician advisor to the local celiac Sprue support group and is a published author and researcher who is developing a web based educational program for people suffering from food intolerances, www.thefooddoc.com
    Article Source: EzineArticles.com

    Scott Adams

    Celiac.com 03/21/2007 - Celiac disease is an inherited autoimmune disorder marked by an inflammatory condition in the small intestine that triggers when genetically susceptible individuals consume wheat. Symptoms of celiac most commonly begin around age two, after wheat has been introduced into the diet, or in the third and fourth decades of adult life.
    In genetically susceptible people, the ingestion of wheat gluten protein triggers an inflammatory reaction in the small bowel that causes a collapse of the villi, the small finger-like projections responsible for nutrient absorption. This greatly reduces the amount of surface area available for nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption. The extent of this intestinal damage generally correlates to the severity of the symptoms.
    Celiac generally presents gastrointestinal and other symptoms including: abdominal cramps; gas and bloating; diarrhea; fatigue or general weakness; foul-smelling or grayish stools that are often fatty or oily; Osteoporosis; stunted growth in children; weight loss, however many individuals have little or no symptoms at all.
    Celiac disease can also occur in asymptomatic individuals who have associated conditions. Recent studies show the prevalence of celiac in children under 15 years in the general population to be 3 to 13 per 1,000 children, or approximately 1:300 to 1:80 children. A figure of 1 in 133 people is commonly used as an average for rates of celiac disease in the general population.
    Celiac Disease Diagnosis
    Celiac disease can be challenging to diagnose, because its symptoms are often similar to those of other diseases. Celiac disease is easily taken for other diseases such as Crohns disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, diverticulitis, various intestinal infections, irritable bowel syndrome, iron-deficiency anemia caused by menstrual blood loss. Thus, celiac disease is often misdiagnosed, and greatly under-diagnosed.
    Celiac practice guidelines call for routine screening of anyone with a family history of celiac disease or of disorders such as thyroid disease, anemia of unknown cause, type 1 diabetes or other immune disorders or Downs syndrome. Otherwise, patients are generally screened case by case according to individual symptoms.
    Considerations for Celiac Disease
    As a general practice, celiac disease should be considered in the earliest stages of differential diagnosis of children with persistent diarrhea, especially with failure to thrive. Celiac disease should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with persistent GI symptoms, including recurrent abdominal pain, constipation and vomiting, and any other GI issues commonly associated with celiac disease.
    Testing is recommended for children with celiac-associated non-gastrointestinal symptoms, such as delayed puberty, dental enamel hypoplasia of permanent teeth, dermatitis herpetiformis, iron-deficient anemia resistant to oral iron, osteoporosis, and short stature. Testing is also recommended for asymptomatic children whose relatives have celiac, and those who have celiac-associated conditions, such as autoimmune thyroiditis, Down syndrome, selective IgA deficiency, Turner syndrome, type 1 diabetes mellitus, or Williams syndrome.
    Celiac practice guidelines call for testing asymptomatic children who belong to at-risk groups at around 3 years of age, as long as they have eaten gluten regularly for at least 1 year before testing.
    First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease may or may not manifest symptoms of the disease.
    Predisposition to gluten sensitivity has been mapped to the major histocompatibility (MHC) D region on chromosome 6. The most important HLA haplotype is DQw2, which is often in linkage with DR3. Other important HLA haplotypes identified are DR7 and DPB 1, 3, 4.1 and 4.2.
    The sites on these MHC class 2 expressed proteins responsible for interacting with gliadin and host T cell receptors thereby sensitizing the intestine to gluten have not been identified.
    Therefore, guidelines call for regular testing of asymptomatic individuals with negative serological tests, and who belong to at-risk groups. Treatment guidelines do not presently call for routinely testing autistic children for celiac disease, as there is no evidence that celiac is more in autistic children than in the general population.
    Celiac Disease Testing
    There is currently no test for diagnosing celiac disease with 100% certainty. For most people, the disappearance of symptoms, and/or the appearance of a "normal" biopsy following the adoption of a gluten-free diet provide the strongest evidence for celiac disease or gluten intolerance.
    A blood test, such as anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibodies, can detect abnormally levels of antibodies, and is often used in the initial detection of celiac in people who are most likely to have the disease, and for those who may need further testing.
    Based on the current evidence and practical considerations, including accuracy, reliability, and cost, measurement of IgA antibody to human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (TTG) is recommended for initial testing for celiac disease. Although as accurate as TTG, measurement of IgA antibody to endomysium (EMA) is observer dependent and therefore more subject to interpretation error and added cost. Because of the inferior accuracy of the antigliadin antibody tests (AGA), the use of AGA IgA and AGA IgG tests alone is no longer recommended for detecting celiac disease.
    Several serological markers are useful in diagnosing celiac disease. The first of these is IgG class antigliadin antibody (AGA). This antibody is sensitive to gluten, but it is also found in other diseases and thus is not a good a specific indicator of celiac.
    Generally, IgA class AGA is more specific, but about 2% of celiac patients show selective IgA deficiency, and thus show negative results, even though they have celiac.
    A positive IgG and IgA AGA gives a reported sensitivity of 96% to100% and specificity of 96% to 97%. Recent studies show Anti-reticulin antibodies (ARA) in people with celiac disease, but these appear to be nonspecific. In fact, taken alone, IgG ARA is largely ineffective. However, IgA ARA has sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 98% in adults. These figures are much lower in children.
    IgA class anti-endomysial antibody (EMA) and human jejunal antibody (JAB) have recently been identified as both sensitive and specific for celiac disease.
    The antibody EMA, which reacts against endomysium reticulin fibers, has been found only in people with active celiac and not other diseases. As EMAs are associated with other diseases in children, they are a less accurate indicator of celiac in children than in adults.
    Studies in children less than 2 years old with celiac disease have shown a steep fall in EMA sensitivity, so EMA appears even less useful than in children over 2 years of age.
    Finally, since the EMA and JAB antibody tests may be negative in adults with celiac disease and IgA deficiency, they cannot be considered definitive for diagnosis of celiac disease.
    A complete panel of antibody tests seems to be most accurate method of diagnosing celiac disease.
    Taken together, a positive panel of IgG AGA, IgA AGA and EMA can predict the presence of celiac disease in 99.3% of patients. A negative panel of IgG AGA, IgA AGA and EMA can predict the absence of celiac in 99.6% of patients.
    These antibodies tend to diminish or disappear when individuals maintain a gluten-free diet.
    More than 90% of patients with celiac disease have genetic markers HLA DQalpha *0501, and HLA DQbeta *0201. Negative tests for these markers in conjunction with negative serum antibody tests suggest an absence of celiac disease. However, positive tests for the genetic markers do not necessarily mean that the patient has celiac disease. In conclusion, genetic markers can be used as a test to exclude celiac disease as a diagnosis.
    Celiac Disease Biopsy
    A diagnosis of celiac disease is generally confirmed through a biopsy, by looking for celiac associated damage to the small intestine.
    One important fact is that intestinal biopsies are regularly obtained endoscopically from the duodenum and therefore provide no information regarding the extent of disease along the jejunum.
    Flattening of the villi usually occurs first, and most severely, in the duodenum, as it the duodenum is the first part of the intestine to be exposed to gluten. Conversely, the villi of the jejunum, which receives much less exposure, are often asymptomatic, and nearly normal.
    In most of these individuals, treatment with a gluten-free diet results in the return of all villous and crypt structures to normal or near normal.
    Certain conditions, especially infection, can yield intestinal biopsy results that are similar to those of celiac disease, and it is important to consider and/or exclude these conditions when celiac disease is suspected.
    Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Celiac Disease with an Aggressive Life-long Gluten-free Diet
    As there is presently no cure for celiac disease, avoiding gluten is crucial. Practice guidelines call for a life-long gluten-free diet as the standard treatment for celiac disease. To manage the disease and prevent complications, its essential that patients avoid all foods that contain gluten. That means it is crucial for the patient to avoid all foods made with wheat, rye, or barley. This includes types of wheat like durum, farina, graham flour, and semolina. Also, bulgur, kamut, kasha, matzo meal, spelt and triticale. Examples of products that commonly contain these include breads, breading, batter, cereals, cooking and baking mixes, pasta, crackers, cookies, cakes, pies and gravies, among others.
    It is also good practice for patients to avoid oats, at least during initial treatment stages, as the effects of oats on celiac patients are not fully understood, and contamination with wheat in processing is common. So, its a good practice when first adopting a gluten-free diet to eliminate oats, at least until symptoms subside, and their reintroduction into the diet can be fairly monitored and evaluated.
    Another good practice is coaching celiac patients to avoid processed foods that may contain hidden gluten. Wheat flour is commonly used in many processed foods that one might never suspect. A few examples include candy bars, canned soup, canned meat, energy bars, ketchup, ice cream, instant coffee, lunchmeat, mustard, pastas, processed meat, sausages, and yogurt.
    Also, gluten is also commonly found in many vitamins and cosmetics, such as lipstick, and in the production of many capsules and tablets, where wheat starch is a commonly used binding agent.
    Obviously, patients must avoid beer made with barley or wheat (there are gluten-free beers), though wine, brandy, whiskey and other non-wheat or non-barley alcohols are okay.
    Encourage patients to eat a diet rich in fish, fresh meats, rice, corn, soybean, potato, poultry, fruits and vegetables. Patients should also avoid milk and other dairy products, as it is common for patients with celiac disease to be lactose intolerant. Dairy products can often be slowly reintroduced into the diet over time with successful treatment.
    It is also important for patients to learn to identify gluten-free foods. Because a gluten-free diet needs to be strictly followed, and because food ingredients may vary from place to place and even over time for a given product, it is important to always read the label.
    For lists of gluten-free foods and products, and for specific advice on adopting, shaping and maintaining the gluten-free diet that is right for them, patients may wish to consult a registered dietitian who is experienced in teaching the gluten-free diet.
    Most patients who remove gluten from their diets find that their symptoms improve as inflammation of the small intestine begins to subside, usually within several weeks. Many patients who adopt a gluten-free diet report an improvement within 48 hours.
    Results of a gluten-free diet can be especially dramatic in children with celiac disease. Not only does their diarrhea and abdominal distress usually subside but, frequently, their behavior and growth rate are often markedly improved.
    A reappearance of intestinal villi nearly always follows an improvement in symptoms.
    In younger people, the villi may complete healing and re-growth in several months, while in older people, the process may take as long as two to three years.
    In cases where nutritional deficiencies are severe, celiac patients may require vitamin and mineral supplements to help bring about a healthier vitamin profile: folic acid and B12 for patients with anemia due to folate or B12 deficiency; vitamin K for patients with an abnormal ProTime; calcium and vitamin D supplements for patients with low blood calcium levels or with osteoporosis. For all such cases, individuals should consult their health professional.
    Skin lesions common in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis often improve with adherence to a gluten-free diet.
    The Importance of Follow-up Testing for Celiac Patients on a Gluten-free Diet
    Research indicates that only half of those patients who have had celiac disease for at least 20 years were following a strict gluten-free diet. Up to 30% of those patients showed evidence of bone loss and iron deficiency. These are but a few of the long-term consequences for celiac patients failing to follow a gluten-free diet.
    Thus, it is important to conduct follow-up testing of celiac patients to determine the success of their gluten-free diets, and the progress of their treatment, and to make any necessary adjustments to each. Even done properly, with no accidental consumption of gluten, the elimination of gluten antibodies from the blood takes months. To estimate the treatments effectiveness, current guidelines call for a single serological testing after 3-6 months on a gluten-free diet.
    For patients who are free of antibodies, and actively following a gluten-free diet, it is wise to consult a doctor if there is any recurrence of celiac-associated symptoms. First-degree relatives of celiac patients should have a repeat blood test every 2-3 years.
    health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com. 

    Jennifer Arrington
    I would hate to add up all the hundreds of dollars I have wasted trying to get healthy.  Now, however, I get healthy by focusing on one thing:  making my intestines healthy.  If my intestines are healthy, I can absorb food.  If I can absorb food, my body will be receiving the nutrition it needs to function, and thus I will be healthy.
    Of course, rule number one for all of us is to stay gluten free.  But, focusing on avoidance alone, can get depressing.  Instead, I like to focus on what I can do to strengthen my digestive system.  That way, all the good gluten free food I am consuming can actually benefit my body.  What good is eating healthy if you are unable to absorb the nutrients?  Pouring healthy food into a compromised gut would be as wasteful as pouring dollar bills over an ATM machine and hoping in vain to strengthen your bank account balance.
    Research shows that those of us with celiac disease/gluten intolerance often have decreased absorption despite following a strict gluten free diet.  Scott Adams summarized one of these articles on the celiac.com website back in 2003.  The article by Lee SK, et al. entitled “Duodenal Histology in Patients with Celiac Disease after Treatment with a Gluten-free Diet” implied that even though patients may feel better on a gluten-free diet, there may still be damaged intestinal areas that are incapable of optimal nutrient absorption.  Since specific nutrients are absorbed along specific locations in the small intestine, this can have long-term ramifications.  For instance, the proximal portion of the intestine is the site for absorption of vitamin B6 (pyroxidine).  If that portion is damaged, there will be decreased absorption, and your body will be deficient in B6.  You may then experience a range of neurological symptoms such as nervousness, irritability, and shakiness.  And, as happened in my case, you may see a doctor, only to be told you are having anxiety attacks and be handed a prescription for a mild tranquilizer.  Thankfully, I discovered that a good B6 supplement (Solgar “Magnesium with B6”) was all I needed and threw away the offending prescription, but this serves as an excellent—albeit oversimplified—example as to why we have to focus on improving the health of our intestines.
    Before I go on, I do want to say that the products listed below do not benefit me financially in the least.  Additionally, these are the products that work best for my body.  You may find a different brand works better for you, but as long as our focus is on getting those intestines healthy, we are all heading in the right direction!
    So, read on about what I personally consider the top four intestinal healing supplements…
    The first and best all-round product I have found that truly aids in restoring the intestinal lining is a glutamine supplement put out by a company called Metagenics.  The supplement, called “Glutagenics”, contains glutamine, licorice root, and aloe vera.  While studying for my masters in nutrition at Texas A&M University, we learned that glutamine is a key amino acid that aids in restoring the intestinal lining in patients that are transitioning from being tube-fed to a normal diet.   So, when my own chiropractor suggested this supplement and mentioned it contained glutamine, I purchased it and have been taking it on and off for three years.  
    Glutagenics is available online through various websites that carry the Metagenics brand. The supplement is unfortunately a bit cost prohibitive, but you can shop around for other brands that contain a similar blend, or buy the three active ingredients separately. Unfortunately, this did not work for me (I have an expensive gut), but it may for you.
    The next product is a good omega-3 fatty acid. Omega-3 fatty acids have so many benefits that even if you weren’t working on building up your intestines, they would still be beneficial. During my graduate research, I was fortunate to be part of an ongoing study on the mechanism whereby omega-3 fatty acids reduce the inflammatory response. Obviously, when our intestines are damaged, there is plenty of inflammation. So, including omega-3 fatty acids in our diet is vital.
    Thankfully, omega-3 fatty acids are getting easier and easier to come by. My family eats the high omega-3 brand eggs and the Smart Balance peanut butter and butter spreads. You can also purchase wonderful oil blends by Nordic Naturals. My favorite is the lemon-flavored Omega-3 liquid. The lemon flavor truly masks the fishy taste and even my children swallow the oil with minimal grumbling. Nordic Naturals is quite expensive (around $20.00 for 8 oz) but if you compare the amount of DHA you are getting per serving, it is definitely the most DHA for your dollar!
    Another great healing nutrient is zinc. Zinc is wonderful for wound healing- you’ll see it in many topical creams, but it also helps restore the intestines. Metagenics puts out a great supplement and their products are great for sensitive individuals. I find that 10mg works best for me. I don’t take it every day – too much will give you a bad taste in your mouth. Once I get that bad taste, I know I need to go off it for awhile.
    Finally (for now), find a great probiotic. The one that everyone recommends, by Garden of Life, contains wheat grass, so we have to avoid it. I do extremely well, however, on a product called Lacidophil by Xymogen. My energy levels actually improve on this brand. Xymogen has their own website where you can purchase products directly. Taking a good probiotic restores a healthy balance to your gut flora, which aids in overall health and digestion. I have just recently ordered one from Emerson Ecologics through a natural doctor and it’s supposed to be even better. It has many more strains of the good bacteria so I’m going to try it as soon as it comes in.
    Of the four products listed above, the two that I take daily are the probiotic and omega-3 oil. The other two I take on an ‘as-I-need-it’ basis.
    Unfortunately, our bodies don’t tolerate a lot of extra supplements, so go slowly and only add one at a time. Keep track of how you feel. You may never tolerate the mass quantities that some companies will try to sell you. But, since you are your own best manager, work with yourself slowly and patiently and you will find your health improves over time.
    May God bless you with the wisdom and discernment you need to live a healthy and vibrant life!


  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
    For a couple of decades now, scientists have been searching for a biological Rosetta stone that would allow them to engineer proteins with precision, but the problem has remained dauntingly complex.  Researchers had a pretty good understanding of the very simple way that the linear chemical code carried by strands of DNA translates into strings of amino acids in proteins. 
    But, one of the main problems in protein engineering has to do with the way proteins fold into their various three-dimensional structures. Until recently, no one has been able to decipher the rules that will predict how proteins fold into those three-dimensional structures.  So even if researchers were somehow able to design a protein with the right shape for a given job, they wouldn’t know how to go about making it from protein’s building blocks, the amino acids.
    But now, scientists like William DeGrado, a chemist at the University of California, San Francisco, and David Baker, director for the Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington, say that designing proteins will become at least as important as manipulating DNA has been in the past couple of decades.
    After making slow, but incremental progress over the years, scientists have improved their ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes. Among other things, they’ve gained a better understanding of how then the laws of physics cause the proteins to snap into folded origami-like structures based on the ways amino acids are attracted or repelled by others many places down the chain.
    It is this new ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes that has fueled their progress. UCSF’s DeGrado is using these new breakthroughs to search for new medicines that will be more stable, both on the shelf and in the body. He is also looking for new ways to treat Alzheimer’s disease and similar neurological conditions, which result when brain proteins fold incorrectly and create toxic deposits.
    Meanwhile, Baker’s is working on a single vaccine that would protect against all strains of the influenza virus, along with a method for breaking down the gluten proteins in wheat, which could help to generate new treatments for people with celiac disease. 
    With new computing power, look for progress on the understanding, design, and construction of brain proteins. As understanding, design and construction improve, look for brain proteins to play a major role in disease research and treatment. This is all great news for people looking to improve our understanding and treatment of celiac disease.
    Source:
    Bloomberg.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.
    But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by  “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it.
    With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether.
    A few of the choice tweets include the following:  
    “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt.
    Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions:
    Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender.
    Dish into bowls.
    Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. 
    Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
    The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow.
    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com