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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    GLUTEN SENSITIVITY: A GASTROENTEROLOGIST'S PERSONAL JOURNEY DOWN THE GLUTEN RABBIT HOLE BY DR. SCOT LEWEY


    Dr. Scot Lewey


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    This article appeared in the Winter 2007 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter.

    Celiac.com 01/30/2007 - Gluten intolerance resulting in symptoms and illness similar to celiac disease without meeting diagnostic criteria for celiac disease is a new concept. This concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) or gluten related disease (GRD) may be a new paradigm that is hard for some people to swallow, especially when I suggest that it affects as much as 10% to 30% of the population.

    Gluten ingestion is an avoidable, treatable, and reversible cause of illness in many people. It is contributing to the rising epidemic of autoimmune diseases. Many resist these concepts finding them either unbelievable, unacceptable or both. I believe that their rejection is neither rational nor helpful. It may be reasonable to reject them for cultural or financial reasons though I don’t believe they can legitimately be rejected based on scientific grounds or experience.

    Celiac disease is not rare. Celiac disease affects 1 in 100 people in the world. Yet the diagnosis of celiac disease is still frequently missed and/or delayed.

    It is a common disease that is often undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. It may even be the most common autoimmune disorder. Though the risk is largely genetic, it is preventable by simply avoiding gluten. Autoimmune diseases associated with celiac disease may also be preventable by avoiding gluten.

    When I was in medical school over twenty-five years ago, I was taught that celiac disease was rare. In residency we were shown photos of short, emaciated children with skinny limbs and pot-bellies. We were told that their medical history included symptoms of profuse, watery, floating, foul-smelling diarrhea, and iron deficiency anemia. The picture and story was burned into the hard drive of our brains, not necessarily because anyone believed we would see someone with celiac disease in our practice, but because celiac disease was considered rare and odd enough that it was a favorite board examination question. That image and story remains in the mind of most physicians, preventing them from seeing celiac disease in a much broader light.

    When I entered subspecialty training in gastroenterology, 13 years ago, specific blood tests for celiac disease were available but still new. We were beginning to order the blood test when classic symptoms of celiac disease were seen without an identifiable cause, or if we happened to sample the small intestine during endoscopy and classic Sprue changes were seen in the intestinal biopsy. celiac disease was still considered somewhat rare. We did not routinely biopsy the small intestine to screen for celiac disease, and genetic tests were not yet available.

    It wasn’t until 2003 that Fasano’s landmark article reported Celiac disease affected 1 in 133 people in the U.S. Only recently has it been accepted that family members of people with celiac disease, those with digestive symptoms, osteoporosis, anemia, and certain neurological, skin or autoimmune disorders constitute high risk groups for celiac disease. They have an even higher risk of between 2% to 5%, though most physicians are unaware of these statistics. Every week, using the strict diagnostic criteria, I confirm 2-3 new cases of celiac disease. I also see 5-10 established celiac disease patients. However, for every identified celiac disease patient there are 3-10 who have clinical histories consistent with celiac disease, but who fail to meet the diagnostic criteria. Yet they respond to a gluten-free diet. Many have suggestive blood test results, biopsies and or gene patterns but some do not.

    More than 90% of people proven to have celiac disease carry one or both of two white blood cell protein patterns or human leukocyte antigen (HLA) patterns HLA DQ2 and/or DQ8. However, so do 35-45% of the general U.S. population, especially those of Northern European ancestry. Yet celiac disease is present in only 1% of the same population. DQ2 or DQ8 are considered by some experts to be necessary though not sufficient to develop celiac disease. However, celiac disease without those two genes has been reported.
    Other gluten related diseases including dermatitis herpetiformis, the neurological conditions of ataxia and peripheral neuropathy, and microscopic colitis have been described in DQ2 and DQ8 negative individuals. The DQ genetic patterns found in other gluten related diseases and associated with elevated stool antibody tests indicate that many more people are genetically at risk for gluten sensitivity. Furthermore, the response of numerous symptoms to gluten-free diet is not limited to people who are DQ2 or DQ8 positive.

    Most celiac experts agree upon and feel comfortable advising people who meet the strict criteria for the diagnosis of celiac disease: they need to follow a life-long gluten-free diet. Controversy and confusion arises when the strict criteria are not met, yet either patient and/or doctor believe that gluten is the cause of their symptoms and illness.

    Many alternative practitioners advise wheat-free, yeast-free diets, which are frequently met with favorable response to what is really a form of gluten-free diet. Similarly, the popularity and successes of low carbohydrate diets require adherence to a diet that has been credited with improvement of headaches, fatigue, bloating, musculoskeletal aches, and an increased general sense of well-being that is self-reported by many dieters. I believe this is because of the low gluten content. Gluten avoidance is clearly associated with improvement of many intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms such as those listed above.

    Many also stumble onto this association after initiating a gluten-free diet or wheat-free diet on the advice of friends or family members; dieticians, nutritionists, alternative or complementary practitioners; or after reading an article on the Internet.

    Within the medical community, there seems to be an irrational resistance to a more widespread recommendation for gluten avoidance. Physicians who maintain that those who fail to meet strict criteria for diagnosis of celiac disease should not be told they have to follow a gluten-free diet will often acknowledge that many of these patients respond favorably to a gluten-free diet. Some, however, continue to insist that a gluten-free diet trial is unnecessary, unduly burdensome, or not scientifically proven to benefit those who do not have celiac disease. This position is taken despite the absence of evidence that a gluten-free diet is unhealthy or dangerous and much evidence supporting it as a healthy diet.

    Those of us who have observed dramatic improvements, both personally and professionally, find such resistance to recommending a gluten-free diet to a broader group of people difficult to understand. Considering the potential dangers and limited benefits of the medications that we, as doctors, prescribe to patients for various symptoms, it really seems absurd to reject dietary treatments. Yet, it does not seem to cross most doctors’ minds to suggest something as safe and healthy as a gluten-free diet, let alone to, at least, test for celiac disease.

    My personal journey into gluten related illness began when my physician wife was diagnosed with celiac disease. I had mentioned to her numerous times over several years that I thought she should be tested for celiac disease. After her second pregnancy she became progressively more ill experiencing, for the first time in her life, diarrhea, fatigue, and chronic neuropathy. An upper endoscopy revealed classic endoscopic findings. Celiac disease blood tests were elevated, and genetic testing confirmed she was DQ2 positive. This forever changed our lives and my practice. But the story doesn’t end there.

    Having diagnosed myself with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and lactose intolerance in medical school, I had not considered gluten as a possible cause of my symptoms until my wife turned the table on me and said I should also be tested for celiac disease. My blood tests were not elevated but I was confirmed to also be DQ2 positive.

    Having observed a good response to gluten-free diet in a few of my patients who had elevated stool gliadin antibody levels, I looked critically at the research behind this testing and spoke with Dr. Ken Fine before paying to have my entire family tested through Enterolab. Both my gliadin and tTG antibodies were elevated and I responded well to a gluten-free diet. I began recommending stool antibody and DQ genetic screening to patients who did not meet the strict criteria for celiac disease but appeared to have symptoms suggestive of gluten sensitivity. Contrary to some critics’ claims about the stool antibody tests, there are many people who do not have elevated levels. Almost everyone I have seen with elevated levels has noted improvement with gluten-free diet, including myself.

    Not only did my “IBS” symptoms resolve and lactose tolerance dramatically improve, but my eyes were further opened to the spectrum of gluten related illness or symptoms. I was already aggressively looking for celiac disease in my patients but I began considering non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) or gluten related diseases (GRD) in all my patients. What I have found is that gluten is an extremely common but frequently missed cause of intestinal and non-intestinal symptoms. Dramatic improvements in symptoms and health can be observed in patients who try a gluten-free diet.

    Since only a fraction of DQ2 or DQ8 positive individuals have or will eventually get celiac disease, does that mean gluten is safe to eat if you have those gene patterns? Even if you do not get celiac disease, does continuing to eat gluten put you at risk for other autoimmune diseases, especially ones linked to the high risk gene patterns? Why do some people with these patterns get celiac disease but most do not? Do some who do not have celiac disease experience symptoms from gluten that would improve with gluten-free diet? These questions need to be answered so that people can decide whether they want to risk that gluten is causing them to be ill, or is increasing their risk of celiac disease or other autoimmune diseases.

    Added to my gluten-free diet, a daily diet of scientific articles on celiac and gluten related disease has revealed that there are many clues in the literature and research indicating the existence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity or a need to broaden our definition of celiac disease. Dr. Hadjivassiliou has called for a new paradigm. He advocates that we start thinking of gluten sensitivity not as an intestinal disease but a spectrum of multiple organ, gluten-related diseases. Mary Schluckebier, director of CSA, asks that physicians interested in this area work on forming and agreeing on new definitions for gluten related illness while pushing for more research and cooperation between medical researchers, food and agricultural scientists, dieticians, and food manufacturers.

    Only those who look for NCGS and advise a gluten-free diet to those not meeting the strict criteria for celiac disease, are going to see the larger group of people who have a favorable response to a broader application of the gluten-free diet without further research. Those of us who are personally affected by gluten sensitivity or professionally involved in treating individuals with adverse reactions to gluten (or both) should support the research into the broader problem of gluten related illness. I believe that NCGS is real and will be validated in studies. Are you open to this concept and are you willing support more research in this area?

    Dr. Scot Lewey is a physician who is specialty trained and board certified in the field of gastroenterology (diseases of the digestive system) who practices his specialty in Colorado. He is the physician advisor to the local celiac Sprue support group and is a published author and researcher who is developing a web based educational program for people suffering from food intolerances, www.thefooddoc.com

    Copyright 2006 The Food Doc, LLC. All Rights Reserved.


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    Guest Eva Thomas

    Posted

    My test for celiac was negative but I have all the symptoms so this article was very helpful.

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    Guest Lisa Cunial

    Posted

    In 1991 I was very ill and after many rounds with doctors and no help I found one who suggested a diagnostic diet. Within a week I was so much better, but it took ages to rehabilitate my whole digestive system. The one thing I have avoided since was gluten and my life has returned to being healthy. I formed the opinion that I was celiac, but as no doctor considered this I was not tested and therefore not diagnosed. Later I have been told to eat gluten so I can have the tests. I say I haven't got that time to waste being sick. I know I get sick when eating it.

     

    Then, I had a daughter and totally breast fed her for 6 months. Then, she had very light gluten load, but when she began preschool this increased with lunches etc., as I was going on the advice not to exclude it as it was vital for a healthy diet. But she developed all the symptoms of Celiac. The blood tests were negative. I wrote to a pediatric gastroenterologist in a major teaching hospital and outlined the symptoms. He did not even need a consultation just booked her in for the biopsy. The results were negative. No evidence of celiac disease. That left me in such a difficult place as all of her symptoms resolved by staying off gluten, but I had no other diagnosis. Her father (separated) and family thinks I am making it all up and sometimes fed her gluten, but she is clever (now 8 year old) and from the beginning understood the diet and enforces it. So she is a healthy child not eating gluten, with no diagnosis. But all of this has led me to think along the lines that this article suggests. I knew 17 years ago that the medical fraternity had it very underestimated.

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    Guest Ruth Arcuri-Kovacs MS, RD

    Posted

    Excellent article, well-written and thought-provoking. I have long believed there is non-celiac gluten sensitivity but am unable to convince many (any?) physicians whose patients I counsel. I'm copying this article to use as a convincing reference tool!

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    Guest Cindy Pickles

    Posted

    Excellent article. I was gluten free for two months before having the blood tests for the antibodies. They were present but not high enough to be called celiac disease. I had the fecal tests and gene test done through Dr. Fine's Enterolab. I have both the DQ2 and DQ8 genes plus the antibody level was high and this was 4 months after going gluten free. Also found out that i was casein intolerant, What a lifestyle change.

    I started looking at all this because there were 9 children in our family and so many diseases and cancers. Now that I am getting on the right train and the right track I am having difficult convincing my siblings and family to be tested.

    I have pulmonary hypertension secondary to scleroderma, osteopenia, Vit D defenciency, iron deficiency, my hair was falling out (that has improved since going gluten free), constipation, reflux, aches and pines all over the place--muscles and joints. It took 57 years to get this way and I know it will take time to undo some of the problems.

    Maybe this will help my family understand what we are up against.

    Cindy,

    Lewisville, NC

    PS I had this bumpy itchy rash as a kid and off an on as an adult. It was diagnosed from contact dermatitis, to ringworm to neuro dermatitis. I now know what it was. We have to be our own medical advocates. If what you are told does not make sense do not just accept the answer. Get another opinion.

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    I also have been diagnosed with Lupus as Lola's mother and have all the symptoms that Cindy has. This article was very interesting to me and I plan to learn how to eat gluten free. Thank you

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    Guest Gluten Free Mom to many

    Posted

    Thank you, thank you. I have told people that I must be a celiac in remission. Celiacs look at me and give me the uh uh, she is in denial look. I was raised by a diagnosed celiac (blood test and biopsy after about 15 years of symptoms) and had symptoms myself for about 2 years prior to my first pregnancy when my symptoms as well as my milk intolerance vanished. GO FIGURE. I have an underground undiagnosed celiac child who had a celiac blood panel done by the family doctor. He was not sure if she has it or not. This celiac panel caused us to not be able to purchase health insurance while we were self employed.

    We are now doing our very best to bury this in her history and pray that this panel never raises it's head again to haunt us (We saw this doctor only a few times and then he moved his practice). I ponder my time of symptoms and scratch my head. I count myself blessed by Heaven. How could I have done the work in my home with my 7 children and battled symptoms myself too. I would have done it, but it would have been hard.

    NCGS what a thought...

    Or is it remission? I guess it does not really matter right now, but I hope for better quality of life for Celiacs and less pain and anguish from insurance companies.

    I know insurance companies are trying to stay in business, but refusing insurance to people with such a common disease?

    Awareness is the key.

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    Guest toni shen

    Posted

    I have been suffering from IBS after my diagnosis of acute transverse myelitis. I have been to gastro specialists who did not give me any solution for this symptom. I feel like a Goodyear blimp with a block of cement in my stomach. I will pass this article to my primary doctor. I need relief on top of my 24/7 neurological pains. Thanks.

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    Guest Stephanie

    Posted

    I loved this article! It has been so hard to get help for our family! A year ago my (then) 3 year old daughter was diagnosed with wheat intolerance as well as some other food intolerances. She always ate tons of food but you could count her ribs front and back. Our GP said that she was 'just the tall & skinny type'. But, she also NEVER had a firm stool. After our family went wheat-free, then gluten-free and she gained 4 lbs in 2 months! The funny thing is that my husband who has had a diagnosis of IBS and reflux for years had his symptoms disappear! We are not going to try the battery of tests for celiac and related issues.

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    I've been gluten free for only 2 weeks and have seen amazing results that I didn't think were possible from any diet, drug, surgery, or treatment. I started the diet immediately after the blood-draw and have since had the results come back negative for Celiac Disease. The tests seem a mere formality---the results of a gluten-free diet speak quite loudly. My most bothersome symptoms included fatigue, flu-like pain, and myoclonic jerks. These symptoms are now greatly reduced, despite hearing that neurological symptoms like myoclonus (involuntary, uncontrollable large muscle jerks) are not likely to reverse with a gluten-free diet. No MRI, EMG, bloodwork, doctor or specialist (including my excellent neurologist and rheumatologist) could pinpoint the cause of the myoclonus. Who would have guessed it was in response to toxic gluten? I no longer feel as if I'm dying from a long drawn-out terminal illness, and I actually feel energized after eating---something I've never experienced in all my 38 years. A note to the wise: Even if you test negative for celiac disease, try a strict gluten-free diet for a couple months. There was seriously a time when I thought a wheelchair might be in my future because of fatigue and weakness from what was diagnosed as Fibromyalgia. I now have my life back. I cannot stress enough how amazing this change has been. Don't hold out for a positive celiac test. NCGS should be considered.

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    Guest Heather Sroufe-Powers

    Posted

    This article is very well written and was so helpful to my family. My son is two and half and has had a gritty very smelly diarrhea, slow growth and constant hunger for two years. I kept a food journal on him for months at a time and it seems to be related to gluten intake. We have him on about a 90% gluten free diet despite the fact that all of his tests for celiac disease came out negative. The gluten free diet has helped so much. Since he hasn't been diagnosed with celiac and the gastroenterologist won't recommend a gluten free diet we can't get the extra medical (dietitian / nutritionist) support to help us figure the whole diet out though.

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    Guest Freda Smith

    Posted

    What interests me is that I know of so many people now (including myself) who have gluten allergies but never had them 10, 20, 30 years ago!

    There seems to be an explosion of NCGS. My friend's little boy was diagnosed as celiac twenty years ago and there were two or three products available. Now there are hundreds. Even a junk food restaurant had a product 'gluten free'.

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    Guest Kristi

    Posted

    In 1991 I was very ill and after many rounds with doctors and no help I found one who suggested a diagnostic diet. Within a week I was so much better, but it took ages to rehabilitate my whole digestive system. The one thing I have avoided since was gluten and my life has returned to being healthy. I formed the opinion that I was celiac, but as no doctor considered this I was not tested and therefore not diagnosed. Later I have been told to eat gluten so I can have the tests. I say I haven't got that time to waste being sick. I know I get sick when eating it.

     

    Then, I had a daughter and totally breast fed her for 6 months. Then, she had very light gluten load, but when she began preschool this increased with lunches etc., as I was going on the advice not to exclude it as it was vital for a healthy diet. But she developed all the symptoms of Celiac. The blood tests were negative. I wrote to a pediatric gastroenterologist in a major teaching hospital and outlined the symptoms. He did not even need a consultation just booked her in for the biopsy. The results were negative. No evidence of celiac disease. That left me in such a difficult place as all of her symptoms resolved by staying off gluten, but I had no other diagnosis. Her father (separated) and family thinks I am making it all up and sometimes fed her gluten, but she is clever (now 8 year old) and from the beginning understood the diet and enforces it. So she is a healthy child not eating gluten, with no diagnosis. But all of this has led me to think along the lines that this article suggests. I knew 17 years ago that the medical fraternity had it very underestimated.

    Lisa,

     

    Good for you on following your mom instincts! A mother truly knows her child best.

     

    I too am a Non-Celiac, Gluten Sensitive individual. My nutritionist confirmed it with a genetic test that involved using a cheek swab sample. Very easy to do. I had 2 copies of the HLA-DQ gene, perhaps this test could help more people who are perplexed by the traditional, negative celiac tests.

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    Wow, I am right with Kim. I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia about a year ago and thought it was the PERFECT fit. However, at 25, I couldn't begin to think that this is how the rest of my life would be. SO, I began searching...I have been on the gluten free diet for about 9-10 months and can't believe the transformation. I now believe that others in my family could very well respond to a gluten-free diet, but I have to convince them, just like this doctor is having to convince other doctors. There is such a thing as non-celiac gluten sensitivity. I have been battling for this "diagnosis" for over 15 years. 3 surgeries and a near lupus diagnosis at 12, makes me relieved to read articles like this. I am not alone and I am not making this stuff up.

     

    I hope everyone has as much success as I have had!

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    I've been gluten free for only 2 weeks and have seen amazing results that I didn't think were possible from any diet, drug, surgery, or treatment. I started the diet immediately after the blood-draw and have since had the results come back negative for Celiac Disease. The tests seem a mere formality---the results of a gluten-free diet speak quite loudly. My most bothersome symptoms included fatigue, flu-like pain, and myoclonic jerks. These symptoms are now greatly reduced, despite hearing that neurological symptoms like myoclonus (involuntary, uncontrollable large muscle jerks) are not likely to reverse with a gluten-free diet. No MRI, EMG, bloodwork, doctor or specialist (including my excellent neurologist and rheumatologist) could pinpoint the cause of the myoclonus. Who would have guessed it was in response to toxic gluten? I no longer feel as if I'm dying from a long drawn-out terminal illness, and I actually feel energized after eating---something I've never experienced in all my 38 years. A note to the wise: Even if you test negative for celiac disease, try a strict gluten-free diet for a couple months. There was seriously a time when I thought a wheelchair might be in my future because of fatigue and weakness from what was diagnosed as Fibromyalgia. I now have my life back. I cannot stress enough how amazing this change has been. Don't hold out for a positive celiac test. NCGS should be considered.

    You are not alone!! I was diagnosed at age 25 with Fibromyalgia. I couldn't believe that I would feel "that" way for the rest of my life. I went from a college athlete to canceling dates with my husband because of how ill I felt. I went gluten free (no tests, just something I chose to do) about 2 months after the diagnosis and I have been Gluten Free for 9-10 months and have NO fibro symptoms to date. I hope that you continue to have success on your Gluten-Free journey!

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    Guest Marianna

    Posted

    I stumbled upon gluten-free diet after being baffled by a combination of odd symptoms...irregular digestion, pain, bloating, muscle joint pain, hair falling out, fatigue, weight fluctuations and a weird tingling feeling in my fingertips. I am completely normal now after being gluten free for over a year. I am a scientist-type so It was easy for me to scrutinize everything I ate..be patient and stick with it even if it feels complicated..and don't give up if your test results are "inconclusive". If you eliminate something from your diet but don't change anything else and you feel better and stay better..that's good enough proof for now. just be aware that it is an ELIMINATION diet...and you have to be patient and stick with it.

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    Guest Rise Myers

    Posted

    Wow, the first time I heard of Celiac disease was when my autistic and diabetic nephew's endocrinologist recommended it for my nephew, and when he tested positive, I had my autistic son tested, and BAM!!! At 6 ft. 1, he never weighed more than 120 lbs, and looked like he suffered from starvation. I always knew he couldn't absorb nutrients from food, although he ate more than twice the normal amounts. No wonder!! Since going Gluten Free, his entire health has turned around. He's gained weight, and his gum disease has curtailed. When I first started buying him baked goodies, he'd reject everything, as you know they taste like cardboard. So, I developed a better way, and I now have a Gluten free, Flour free bakery of brownies so delicious, and so naturally made, that they taste exactly like the old flour ones.

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    In 1991 I was very ill and after many rounds with doctors and no help I found one who suggested a diagnostic diet. Within a week I was so much better, but it took ages to rehabilitate my whole digestive system. The one thing I have avoided since was gluten and my life has returned to being healthy. I formed the opinion that I was celiac, but as no doctor considered this I was not tested and therefore not diagnosed. Later I have been told to eat gluten so I can have the tests. I say I haven't got that time to waste being sick. I know I get sick when eating it.

     

    Then, I had a daughter and totally breast fed her for 6 months. Then, she had very light gluten load, but when she began preschool this increased with lunches etc., as I was going on the advice not to exclude it as it was vital for a healthy diet. But she developed all the symptoms of Celiac. The blood tests were negative. I wrote to a pediatric gastroenterologist in a major teaching hospital and outlined the symptoms. He did not even need a consultation just booked her in for the biopsy. The results were negative. No evidence of celiac disease. That left me in such a difficult place as all of her symptoms resolved by staying off gluten, but I had no other diagnosis. Her father (separated) and family thinks I am making it all up and sometimes fed her gluten, but she is clever (now 8 year old) and from the beginning understood the diet and enforces it. So she is a healthy child not eating gluten, with no diagnosis. But all of this has led me to think along the lines that this article suggests. I knew 17 years ago that the medical fraternity had it very underestimated.

    I'm the same way. Celiac tests are negative, but I have almost all the symptoms. The only thing that gets me well again is avoiding gluten. So I live as if the test results were positive, and feel like a healthy person for it.

    Wish you and your little one well.

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    I too came up negative on the Celiac Sprue blood panel, but I have most of the Celiac symptoms. I started suspecting Celiac disease when I went on a very restrictive low card diet to try & help my skin (I also have cystic acne). I noticed how much better I felt all around after a couple of weeks. Then I slowly started adding things back into my diet. When I got to wheat & gluten all my previous symptoms came back. Over time they even got worse, so, on my own, I went on a strictly gluten free diet and as long as I avoid it I feel "normal". Long story short, avoiding gluten has saved me from more misery and embarrassment. I'm life long gluten free from this point forward.

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    Guest Matthew

    Posted

    Like many who have posted here, I've had an array of to date undiagnosed symptoms ranging from GI to neurological (peripheral neuropathy, headaches, twitches). I've also had periodic muscle aches, joint pain, dizziness, blurred vision, and facial flushing. Several MRIs, loads of blood work, and a celiac panel and biopsy, everything has come back normal. I'm 30 and have been gluten free for two weeks and was wondering how long it typically takes to begin seeing signs of improvement?

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    Guest Billie Adams

    Posted

    Out of curiosity, has anyone had vitiligo (which is an auto-immune disorder) reverse when they omitted the gluten from their diet? I have some of the other symptoms also, such as the rashes and swelling of the stomach. However, I would like to know if this is linked as well.

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    I'm the same way. Celiac tests are negative, but I have almost all the symptoms. The only thing that gets me well again is avoiding gluten. So I live as if the test results were positive, and feel like a healthy person for it.

    Wish you and your little one well.

    I have found through lots of research that the ONLY true test for celiac disease is to have an intestinal biopsy!

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    Dr. Scot Lewey

    This article appeared in the Summer 2006 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter.
    Celiac.com 08/31/2006 - All of us have patterns of proteins on the surface of our white blood cells. These proteins are known as human leukocyte antigens (HLA), one of which is DQ. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), and several autoimmune conditions occur more frequently with certain HLA DQ types. DQ gene testing is performed by analyzing cells from a blood sample or from a Q-tip swab of the mouth. HLA types have a naming system that can be confusing even to scientists and physicians but here is my explanation of the testing, the results, and what they may mean to you and your family.
    Each of us has two copies of HLA DQ. Because there are 9 serotypes of DQ we are all DQx/DQx where x is a number between 1 & 9. For example, I am DQ2/DQ7. I received the DQ2 from one of my parents and the DQ7 from the other. Because we get one DQ type from each of our parents and give one to each of our children it is easy to to see how the DQ genes pass through a family. This is important because two DQ types, DQ2 and DQ8, are estimated to be present in over 98% of all people who have celiac disease, the most severe form of gluten sensitivity.
    Rarely, true celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, the skin disease equivalent of celiac, have been reported to occur in people who do not have DQ2 and/or DQ8. However, according to unpublished data from Dr. Ken Fine of Enterolab, the other six types, except DQ4, are associated with risk for elevated stool antibodies to gliadin, the toxic fraction of gluten, and/or tissue transglutaminase (tTG) an enzyme. Both of these antibodies are usually elevated in the blood of individuals with celiac disease though they may be normal in the blood of individuals who are gluten sensitive and have a normal small intestine biopsy but respond favorably to a gluten-free diet.
    Fine has publicly reported that elevated stool antibodies to gliadin and/or tTG have been detected in all of the untreated celiacs tested in his lab and 60% of non-celiacs who have symptoms consistent with gluten sensitivity but in none of the controls tested including cow manure. Follow up surveys of those individuals with elevated stool antibodies who initiated a gluten-free diet compared with those with elevated antibodies who did not reportedly showed significantly improved quality of life and improved symptoms in the gluten-free group.
    He also reported DQ2 and DQ8 positive individuals have had, as a rule, the highest elevations of stool gliadin antibody followed by those who are DQ7 positive. Only those who are doubly positive for DQ4 have not been found to have significantly elevated antibodies to indicated gluten sensitivity. This is consistent with the differences in prevalence rates of celiac disease seen in various parts of the world since DQ4 is not generally found in Caucasians of Northern European ancestry where celiac incidence is highest but in those from Asia or Southern Africa where there is a very low incidence of celiac disease and gluten intolerance.
    DQ2 & DQ8, the two major types present in 90-99% of people who have celiac disease, are present in approximately 35-45% of people in the U.S., especially those of Caucasian race of Northern European ancestry, with highest risk of celiac disease but the prevalence in U.S. of celiac disease is 1%. Though a prevalence of 1 in 100 is very common and much higher than had been believed for years, only a fraction of the genetically at risk are confirmed to have celiac disease by abnormal blood tests and small intestine biopsies. However, the number of people who report a positive response to gluten-free diet is much higher.
    The stool antibody tests results would support this and the concept of a spectrum of gluten sensitivity that is much broader and in need of better diagnostic definitions. I am an example of someone who is DQ2/DQ7 who has normal blood tests for celiac disease but abnormal stool antibody tests and symptoms that responded to gluten-free diet. The strict criteria for diagnosing celiac disease, which is abnormal blood tests and a characteristic small intestine biopsy showing classic damage from gluten, is much narrower than what is being seen clinically.
    It is becoming obvious to many of us who have personal and professional medical experience with gluten intolerance and celiac disease that the problem of gluten sensitivity is much greater and extends beyond the high risk celiac genes DQ2 and DQ8. Traditionally it is reported and believed by many that if you are DQ2 and DQ8 negative you are unlikely to have celiac disease or ever develop it, though this cannot be said with 100% certainty especially since there are documented cases of celiac disease and the skin equivalent of celiac disease, known as dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) in individuals who are DQ2 and DQ8 negative.
    Therefore, knowing your DQ specific serotype pattern may be helpful for several reasons. For example, if you have more than one copy of DQ2 or DQ8, you carry two of the major genes. For example, if you are DQ2/DQ2, DQ2/DQ8, or DQ8/DQ8, a term Scott Adams of www.celiac.com has dubbed a "super celiac" you may be at much higher risk for celiac disease and have more severe gluten sensitivity. Certainly if you are DQ2 and/or DQ8 positive you are at increased risk for celiac disease. After a single copy of DQ2 or DQ8, it appears that DQ7/DQ7 might be next highest risk. Dr. Fine has also noted some other associations of the DQ patterns with microscopic or collagenous colitis, neurologic manifestations of gluten sensitivity and dermatitis herpetiformis, which has been one of the gluten sensitive conditions noted to be, at times, occurring in DQ2, DQ8 negative individuals.
    Why some people get celiac Disease or become gluten sensitive is not well understood but certain factors are believed to include onset of puberty, pregnancy, stress, trauma or injury, surgery, viral or bacterial infections including those of the gut, medication induced gut injury or toxicity e.g. non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, etc., immune suppression or autoimmune diseases especially since several of those factors are associated with onset or unmasking of gluten sensitivity in someone who is at risk or not manifesting any recognizable symptoms. There is also well known group of individuals who are termed "latent" celiacs. They are at high risk because they have close relatives who have celiac disease with whom they share one or more of the celiac genes DQ2 and/or DQ8 though they usually have few or no symptoms but sometimes have abnormal blood tests and/or biopsies indicating possible or definite celiac disease. Others have negative blood tests and normal biopsies but symptoms that respond to a gluten-free diet.
    The severity of the sensitivity to gluten appears to be related to the DQ type, family history (highest risk is in the non affected identical twin of a celiac), pre-existing intestinal injury, degree of exposure to gluten (how frequent and large a gluten load an individual is exposed to), and immune status. Once initiated, gluten sensitivity tends to be life long. True celiac disease requires life-long complete gluten avoidance to reduce the increased risk of serious complications of undiagnosed and untreated celiac such as severe malabsorption, cancers, especially of the GI tract and lymphoma, other autoimmune diseases and premature death due to these complications.
    Again, DQ testing can be done with cells from blood or by a swab of the inside of the mouth but not all labs test for or report the full DQ typing but only the presence or absence of DQ2 and DQ8. The lab that performs DQ testing is usually determined by an individual insurance company on the basis of contracts with specific commercial labs. However, if your insurance contracts with Quest Labs or the Laboratory at Bonfils (Denver, CO) full DQ can be done if ordered and authorized by the insurance company.
    For those willing to pay out of pocket, Bonfils performs full DQ testing for Enterolab (www.enterolab.com) on a sample obtained by a Q tip swab of the mouth. Since it is painless and non-invasive it is well tolerated especially by young children. Also because the testing can be ordered without a physician and the sample obtained in their home using a kit obtained from Enterolab it is convenient. The kit is returned by overnight delivery by to Enterolab who forwards the test onto Bonfils. The cost is $149 for the genetic testing alone and has to be paid for in advance by credit card or money order and is generally not reimbursed by insurance.
    Enterolab also provides the stool testing for gliadin and tissue transglutaminase antibodies to determine if gluten sensitivity is evident. The gliadin antibody alone is $99 or the full panel includes genetic typing, stool testing for gluten and cows milk protein antibodies, and a test for evidence of malabsorption is $349.
    Again, the advantages of full DQ testing is determining if someone has more than one copy of DQ2 or DQ8 or carry both and therefore have a higher risk for celiac disease or more severe gluten intolerance. If you are DQ2 or DQ8 negative then your risk of celiac disease is low, though not non-existent. If you are not DQ4/DQ4 then you do have risk for gluten sensitivity. If you determine all DQ types within enough family members you can piece together a very accurate history of the origin of celiac and gluten sensitivity within a family and make some very accurate predictions of risk to other family members.
    Though the lay public and many clinicians are finding the genetic tests helpful, many, including most physicians, do not understand the genetics of gluten sensitivity. We are awaiting Dr. Fines published data on the significance of stool antibody tests and their association to the other DQ types as his lab is the only lab offering the stool antibody tests in the U.S. Other celiac researchers in U.S. have failed to reproduce his assay but scattered reports in the literature are appearing including a recent article in the British Medical Journal indicating stool antibody testing is feasible, non-invasive, and using their protocol, highly specific but not sensitive for celiac disease in children. (Editors note: When present, these antibodies indicate celiac disease. However, they are not present in many cases of celiac disease.)
    In the meantime, many patients are faced with the uncertainty and added cost of full DQ testing and stool testing due to the failure of traditional blood tests, small bowel biopsies, and the presence or absence of DQ2 and DQ8 to diagnose or exclude gluten sensitivity. Physicians unfamiliar with this testing are increasingly presented with the results and confused or skeptical pending published reports. The medical community continues to lack a consensus regarding the definitions of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and what tests justify recommendations for gluten-free diet. It is clear that gluten sensitivity, by any criteria, is much more common than ever thought and a hidden epidemic exists.
    Dr. Scot Lewey is a physician who is specialty trained and board certified in the field of gastroenterology (diseases of the digestive system) who practices his specialty in Colorado. He is the physician advisor to the local celiac Sprue support group and is a published author and researcher who is developing a web based educational program for people suffering from food intolerances, www.thefooddoc.com
    Article Source: EzineArticles.com

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
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    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
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    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
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    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
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    Source:
    cnbc.com

    admin
    WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects around 1% of the population. People with celiac disease suffer an autoimmune reaction when they consume wheat, rye or barley. The immune reaction is triggered by certain proteins in the wheat, rye, or barley, and, left untreated, causes damage to the small, finger-like structures, called villi, that line the gut. The damage occurs as shortening and villous flattening in the lamina propria and crypt regions of the intestines. The damage to these villi then leads to numerous other issues that commonly plague people with untreated celiac disease, including poor nutritional uptake, fatigue, and myriad other problems.
    Celiac disease mostly affects people of Northern European descent, but recent studies show that it also affects large numbers of people in Italy, China, Iran, India, and numerous other places thought to have few or no cases.
    Celiac disease is most often uncovered because people experience symptoms that lead them to get tests for antibodies to gluten. If these tests are positive, then the people usually get biopsy confirmation of their celiac disease. Once they adopt a gluten-free diet, they usually see gut healing, and major improvements in their symptoms. 
    CLASSIC CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS
    Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, upset stomach, bloating, gas, weight loss, and malnutrition, among others.
    LESS OBVIOUS SYMPTOMS
    Celiac disease can often less obvious symptoms, such fatigue, vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, to name a few. Often, these symptoms are regarded as less obvious because they are not gastrointestinal in nature. You got that right, it is not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms. That makes spotting and connecting these seemingly unrelated and unclear celiac symptoms so important.
    NO SYMPTOMS
    Currently, most people diagnosed with celiac disease do not show symptoms, but are diagnosed on the basis of referral for elevated risk factors. 

    CELIAC DISEASE VS. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE
    Gluten intolerance is a generic term for people who have some sort of sensitivity to gluten. These people may or may not have celiac disease. Researchers generally agree that there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. That term has largely replaced the term gluten-intolerance. What’s the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity? 
    CELIAC DISEASE VS. NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (NCGS)
    Gluten triggers symptoms and immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Gluten can also trigger symptoms in some people with NCGS, but the similarities largely end there.

    There are four main differences between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity:
    No Hereditary Link in NCGS
    Researchers know for certain that genetic heredity plays a major role in celiac disease. If a first-degree relative has celiac disease, then you have a statistically higher risk of carrying genetic markers DQ2 and/or DQ8, and of developing celiac disease yourself. NCGS is not known to be hereditary. Some research has shown certain genetic associations, such as some NCGS patients, but there is no proof that NCGS is hereditary. No Connection with Celiac-related Disorders
    Unlike celiac disease, NCGS is so far not associated with malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, or a higher risk of autoimmune disorders or intestinal malignancies. No Immunological or Serological Markers
    People with celiac disease nearly always test positive for antibodies to gluten proteins. Researchers have, as yet, identified no such antobodies or serologic markers for NCGS. That means that, unlike with celiac disease, there are no telltale screening tests that can point to NCGS. Absence of Celiac Disease or Wheat Allergy
    Doctors diagnose NCGS only by excluding both celiac disease, an IgE-mediated allergy to wheat, and by the noting ongoing adverse symptoms associated with gluten consumption. WHAT ABOUT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) AND IRRITABLE BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)?
    IBS and IBD are usually diagnosed in part by ruling out celiac disease. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome are sensitive to gluten. Many experience celiac disease-like symptoms in reaction to wheat. However, patients with IBS generally show no gut damage, and do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin and other proteins as do people with celiac disease. Some IBS patients also suffer from NCGS.

    To add more confusion, many cases of IBS are, in fact, celiac disease in disguise.

    That said, people with IBS generally react to more than just wheat. People with NCGS generally react to wheat and not to other things, but that’s not always the case. Doctors generally try to rule out celiac disease before making a diagnosis of IBS or NCGS. 
    Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease share many common symptoms, though causes are different.  In Crohn’s disease, the immune system can cause disruption anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, and a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease typically requires more diagnostic testing than does a celiac diagnosis.  
    Crohn’s treatment consists of changes to diet and possible surgery.  Up to 10% of Crohn's patients can have both of conditions, which suggests a genetic connection, and researchers continue to examine that connection.
    Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Large Number of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Sensitive To Gluten Some IBD Patients also Suffer from Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS
    Diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult. 

    Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, proper diagnosis often takes years. A positive serological test for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. 
    But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and obvious symptoms. Also, researchers are developing accurate and reliable ways to test for celiac disease even when patients are already avoiding wheat. In the past, patients needed to be consuming wheat to get an accurate test result. 
    Celiac disease can have numerous vague, or confusing symptoms that can make diagnosis difficult.  Celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed by doctors. Read a Personal Story About Celiac Disease Diagnosis from the Founder of Celiac.com Currently, testing and biopsy still form the cornerstone of celiac diagnosis.
    TESTING
    There are several serologic (blood) tests available that screen for celiac disease antibodies, but the most commonly used is called a tTG-IgA test. If blood test results suggest celiac disease, your physician will recommend a biopsy of your small intestine to confirm the diagnosis.
    Testing is fairly simple and involves screening the patients blood for antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA), and/or doing a biopsy on the areas of the intestines mentioned above, which is still the standard for a formal diagnosis. Also, it is now possible to test people for celiac disease without making them concume wheat products.

    BIOPSY
    Until recently, biopsy confirmation of a positive gluten antibody test was the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. It still is, but things are changing fairly quickly. Children can now be accurately diagnosed for celiac disease without biopsy. Diagnosis based on level of TGA-IgA 10-fold or more the ULN, a positive result from the EMA tests in a second blood sample, and the presence of at least 1 symptom could avoid risks and costs of endoscopy for more than half the children with celiac disease worldwide.

    WHY A GLUTEN-FREE DIET?
    Currently the only effective, medically approved treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. Following a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms, promotes gut healing, and prevents nearly all celiac-related complications. 
    A gluten-free diet means avoiding all products that contain wheat, rye and barley, or any of their derivatives. This is a difficult task as there are many hidden sources of gluten found in the ingredients of many processed foods. Still, with effort, most people with celiac disease manage to make the transition. The vast majority of celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet see symptom relief and experience gut healing within two years.
    For these reasons, a gluten-free diet remains the only effective, medically proven treatment for celiac disease.
    WHAT ABOUT ENZYMES, VACCINES, ETC.?
    There is currently no enzyme or vaccine that can replace a gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease.
    There are enzyme supplements currently available, such as AN-PEP, Latiglutetenase, GluteGuard, and KumaMax, which may help to mitigate accidental gluten ingestion by celiacs. KumaMax, has been shown to survive the stomach, and to break down gluten in the small intestine. Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003, is an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. GluteGuard has been shown to significantly protect celiac patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. There are other enzymes, including those based on papaya enzymes.

    Additionally, there are many celiac disease drugs, enzymes, and therapies in various stages of development by pharmaceutical companies, including at least one vaccine that has received financial backing. At some point in the not too distant future there will likely be new treatments available for those who seek an alternative to a lifelong gluten-free diet. 

    For now though, there are no products on the market that can take the place of a gluten-free diet. Any enzyme or other treatment for celiac disease is intended to be used in conjunction with a gluten-free diet, not as a replacement.

    ASSOCIATED DISEASES
    The most common disorders associated with celiac disease are thyroid disease and Type 1 Diabetes, however, celiac disease is associated with many other conditions, including but not limited to the following autoimmune conditions:
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: 2.4-16.4% Multiple Sclerosis (MS): 11% Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: 4-6% Autoimmune hepatitis: 6-15% Addison disease: 6% Arthritis: 1.5-7.5% Sjögren’s syndrome: 2-15% Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: 5.7% IgA Nephropathy (Berger’s Disease): 3.6% Other celiac co-morditities include:
    Crohn’s Disease; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Chronic Pancreatitis Down Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Lupus Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Turner Syndrome Ulcerative Colitis; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Williams Syndrome Cancers:
    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (intestinal and extra-intestinal, T- and B-cell types) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma Esophageal carcinoma Papillary thyroid cancer Melanoma CELIAC DISEASE REFERENCES:
    Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University
    Gluten Intolerance Group
    National Institutes of Health
    U.S. National Library of Medicine
    Mayo Clinic
    University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/17/2018 - Could the holy grail of gluten-free food lie in special strains of wheat that lack “bad glutens” that trigger the celiac disease, but include the “good glutens” that make bread and other products chewy, spongey and delicious? Such products would include all of the good things about wheat, but none of the bad things that might trigger celiac disease.
    A team of researchers in Spain is creating strains of wheat that lack the “bad glutens” that trigger the autoimmune disorder celiac disease. The team, based at the Institute for Sustainable Agriculture in Cordoba, Spain, is making use of the new and highly effective CRISPR gene editing to eliminate the majority of the gliadins in wheat.
    Gliadins are the gluten proteins that trigger the majority of symptoms for people with celiac disease.
    As part of their efforts, the team has conducted a small study on 20 people with “gluten sensitivity.” That study showed that test subjects can tolerate bread made with this special wheat, says team member Francisco Barro. However, the team has yet to publish the results.
    Clearly, more comprehensive testing would be needed to determine if such a product is safely tolerated by people with celiac disease. Still, with these efforts, along with efforts to develop vaccines, enzymes, and other treatments making steady progress, we are living in exciting times for people with celiac disease.
    It is entirely conceivable that in the not-so-distant future we will see safe, viable treatments for celiac disease that do not require a strict gluten-free diet.
    Read more at Digitaltrends.com , and at Newscientist.com