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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com's Best Gluten-free Thanksgiving and Holiday Guide

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 11/11/2010 - The holidays are upon us, once again, and that means it's time toremind folks that a little planning and preparation will help anyonewith celiac disease or gluten intolerance to enjoy a safe, deliciousgluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday season without worrying aboutinadvertently eating wheat or gluten.

    For folks cooking a gluten-free turkey dinner at home, here are some helpful tips to make things easier:

    • First, make sure the turkey you plan to serve for your gluten-freeholiday dinner is, in fact, a gluten-free turkey. This is notautomatically true. Many brands of turkey are processed with addedgluten—so, don't assume, and make sure to check the ingredients list.Celiac.com offers a pretty comprehensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make yourgluten-free shopping easier.
    • Second, make sure that any stuffing you serve is gluten-free! Accept nosubstitute. There's no need to risk putting gluten-based stuffing inyour turkey. You can astound and delight all your guests withceliac.com's delicious Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe (below).
    • Third, prepare a simple, delicious gluten-free gravy using Celiac.com'sThanksgiving Holiday Gluten-Free Turkey Gravy recipe, or your favorite gluten-freegravy mix.
    • Note: Be careful, many bouillon cubes contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes
    • Tip: Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch or arrowroot flour.
    Prepare easy, tasty gluten-free side dishes by browsing Celiac.com'sextensive listing of gluten-free recipes, where you will find sidedishes to impress even the snootiest gourmet.

    Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items likeprepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allowyou to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending allof your time in the kitchen!

    Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered anddelivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall, and your purchases there actually directly support Celiac.com.

    Here are some helpful holiday tips and information for anyone planning to dine out, or at a friend or relative's house:

    Celiac.com's Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe

    The final gluten-free holiday stuffing. Photo: CC/peretzpupIngredients:
    5-6 cups white, gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    3 cups celery, chopped
    2 shallots, minced
    1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, chopped
    1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced
    1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced
    1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced
    1-1½ cups gluten-free chicken broth
    ½ cup white wine
    1 egg yolk
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon pepper
    Bits of cooked sausage or bacon, diced chestnut, pecan, apple,cranberry, currant, or raisin (optional) *Make sure any sausage isgluten-free!

    Preparation:
    Sauté shallots, onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent.

    Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or twominutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Add wine andcontinue cooking over medium heat until liquid is reduced by half.Remove from heat and allow to cool.

    Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Note: If cooking stuffing inside turkey, add just 1 cup of chicken broth.

    Place the egg yolk in a large bowl and carefully spoon two or threeounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whiskingthe mixture.

    Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Make sure toblend a small amount of stock into the egg first to prevent scrambledeggs.

    Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and eggmixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly.Add the salt and pepper and mix.

    Place the stuffing mixture into a greased casserole dish and cook  in400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, untildone.

    Note: The stuffing is done when you can insert a toothpick into thestuffing and it comes out clean. Make sure you bake stuffing until thetoothpick comes out clean.

    Serves about six to eight people.

    Suggestion: Add finely diced cooked sausage or bacon bits to thesautéed vegetables, or toss in bits of diced chestnut, pecan, apple,cranberry, currant, or raisin. *Make sure any sausage is gluten-free!

    Gluten-free Classics: Holiday Pumpkin Pie

    Gluten-free holiday pumpkin pies. Photo: CC-cardamomIngredients:
    ¾ cup granulated sugar
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon ground ginger
    ¼ teaspoon ground clove
    2 large eggs (Duck eggs work great!)
    1 can (15 oz.) Libby's 100% Pure Pumpkin (Yes, it's gluten-free!)
    1 can (12 fl. oz.) Evaporated Milk (Delicious with evaporated goat's milk!)
    1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) gluten-free pie shell
    Whipped cream (optional)

    Directions:
    Mix sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggsin large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stirin evaporated milk.

    Pour into gluten-free pie shell.

    Bake in preheated 425° F oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to350° F; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near centercomes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately orrefrigerate. Top with whipped cream before serving.

    *Adapted from Libby's Original Pumpkin Pie Recipe

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I find a 50/50 mix of Rice Chex and Corn Chex is a great substitute for bread crumbs or bread in stuffing. Just crush them, put them in a bowl, and use like regular bread crumbs or cubes. And much cheaper than using a loaf of gluten free bread.

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    Guest evelyn altschuler

    Posted

    I find a 50/50 mix of Rice Chex and Corn Chex is a great substitute for bread crumbs or bread in stuffing. Just crush them, put them in a bowl, and use like regular bread crumbs or cubes. And much cheaper than using a loaf of gluten free bread.

    using rice chex and corn chex looks like a good change and easy.

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    I find a 50/50 mix of Rice Chex and Corn Chex is a great substitute for bread crumbs or bread in stuffing. Just crush them, put them in a bowl, and use like regular bread crumbs or cubes. And much cheaper than using a loaf of gluten free bread.

    Great ideas! Thanks!!!

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    This thanksgiving we had our first gluten-free experience and I must say it turned out great. We made a gluten free southern-style corn bread dressing. I think I have a new favorite--the dressing did not sit heavy on my stomach like regular dressing has. I was disappointed when the leftovers were gone. I think I will definitely do this again. The pastries gave us some problems. I have since found some xanthan free pie shells and am hoping they will work out better. I had just found out my daughter in law to be was a celiac so we tried to give her a fully gluten free holiday. For a non gluten free cook some things are very hard to find--is there another way to do this?

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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