Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Cheerios Are Finally Going Gluten-Free

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Caption: Photo: Mike Mozart

    Celiac.com 02/25/2015 - General Mills has announced that original Cheerios, Honey Nut Cheerios and three other Cheerios varieties will undergo formula changes, including a switch to gluten-free oats, and will be released as a gluten-free cereal.

    Photo: Mike MozartThe move by the food and cereal giant mirrors a similar recipe change that successfully boosted sales for its Chex brand, which has been gluten-free since 2010.

    The company will likely begin selling gluten-free versions in July, says Jim Murphy, president of Big G Cereals, General Mills' ready-to-eat cereal division.

    Apparently, General Mills felt that that could no longer ignore the skyrocketing sales of gluten-free foods, and the slow decline of foods that contain gluten, including breakfast cereals.

    "People are actually walking away from cereal because they are avoiding gluten," says Murphy, a development that, at a time when cereal sales, including Cheerios, are already weak, the company can ill afford.

    Meanwhile, unit sales growth of food with a gluten-free claim on its packaging grew 10.6% in 2014 compared to the previous year, and gluten-free sales, especially among breakfast cereals are expected to continue double-digit growth through at least 2018.


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    I understand that some of the gluten free Chex cereals, while stating that they have no high fructose corn syrup, contain a fructose that is even worse. The rice forms use actual sugar.

    I wonder what ingredients we will find in the Cheerios. I would love to support Cheerios with this new product. Love their advertisements.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I would like to know the nutritional value in the gluten free version.

    Also I think people are eating healthier breakfasts, such as oatmeal. Cereal has so many added ingredients, not a good way to start your day.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Oh Happy Day! Since having to go gluten-free I have missed my nightly bowl of Cheerios greatly! I can hardly wait to begin treating myself again! THANK YOU CHEERIOS!!!!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Although it's nice to have more gluten free options in the cereal isle, as I have a picky celiac, what I don't like is their reason for it...more MONEY in their pockets.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Harriet Schipper

    Posted

    Thanks, I always wanted to be able to eat them. My sisters then my sons loved them. I thought, besides the oats not being certified gluten-free, that the malt (which is from barley) was the problem.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Gluten Free Watchdog has an article stating that GM will not use certified gluten free oats , but will be using some proprietary process to separate contaminants like wheat from the cheaper oats they purchase. excerpted from gluten-free Watchdog site: *General Mills is using a proprietary mechanical process that they claim removes wheat and barley from regular oats. These oats will be used in the gluten-free varieties of Cheerios which will be available nationally by the fall of 2015. A separate post on Cheerios is forthcoming. Update (2/12/15): This comment has been posted. Please click HERE

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Forum Discussions

    It only takes one positive to get a referral to a GI.  You have several positives,  but that does not mean you have mo...
    Thank you for the reply. My main question about these labs was are the several positives enough for a diagnosis and what...
    Hi! Know that we are NOT doctors, but you (or anyone else) can see several test positives.  That means that you are ...
×
×
  • Create New...