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    Scott Adams

    Collagenous Sprue - Second Edition of Textbook of Gastroenterology, J.B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia 1995

    Scott Adams
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    Celiac that do not remain on a gluten-free diet can develop Refractory Sprue. Refractory Sprue and Collagenous Sprue patients who initially respond to a gluten-free diet many subsequently relapse despite maintaining their diet. Such patients are then refractory to further dietary therapy. In contrast, others are refractory to dietary therapy from its inception and, assuming they are truly on a gluten-free diet, may not have celiac disease; these patients are said to have unclassified Sprue. Some refractory patients with celiac disease, typical or atypical, respond to treatment with corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive drugs. In others, there is no response and malabsorption may be progressive. Collagenous Sprue is characterized by the development of a thick band of collagen-like material directly under the intestinal epithelial cells and has been regarded by some as a separate entity from celiac disease. However, subepithelial collagen deposition has been noted in up to 36% of patients with classic Celiac Disease and in Tropical Sprue. Although individuals with large amounts of subepithelial collagen may be refractory to therapy, the presence of collagen does not , a riori, preclude a successful response to a gluten-free diet. Collagenous colitis accompanying celiac disease also has been observed and would be considered in the diagnosis of diarrhea occurring in celiac disease patients on a gluten-free diet.

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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