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    Roy Jamron

    Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy and Celiac Disease by Roy Jamron

    Roy Jamron
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 11/07/2006 – We should be hearing more about this in the news soon. A confocal laser endomicroscopy device developed by Optiscan, an Australian company, permits endoscopists to make an accurate real-time diagnosis of celiac disease, bypassing the need to take and prepare and evaluate biopsy specimens in a laboratory. This technique would allow the endoscopist to view and evaluate as many samples as needed to make a correct diagnosis and immediately give the results to the patient. This should reduce diagnostic errors. A paper on Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in the diagnosis of Celiac disease by R. Leong et al. will be presented in Adelaide, Australia this Saturday, Oct. 14.

    Australian Gastroenterology Week (AGW) 2006
    Hosted by the Gastroenterological Society of Australia (GESA)
    Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide, South Australia
    11-14th October 2006.



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    To be presented Oct. 14, 2006:
    Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in the diagnosis of Celiac disease R Leong

    Optiscans unique and patented technology has miniaturized the microscopes scanning head, so that it is now so small it can fit inside the body. Once the miniaturized scanner is integrated into an endoscope to create an endomicroscope, doctors can for the first time safely and instantly get high quality images of tissue at a cellular level from their patients. This gives doctors new levels of information providing a highly magnified view of living tissue that is entirely consistent with the macroscopic views that they are used to seeing from their endoscopes. This breakthrough technology creates a vast array of new applications, both medical and industrial. Optiscans primary focus is in the medical arena, where it can provide a virtual biopsy, potentially revolutionizing current pathology and histology practices.

    About Optiscan
    http://www.optiscan.com.au/about/about_02.asp

    Sample Images
    http://www.optiscan.com.au/Technology/Images_01.asp

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  • About Me

    Roy S. Jamron holds a B.S. in Physics from the University of Michigan and an M.S. in Engineering Applied Science from the University of California at Davis, and independently investigates the latest research on celiac disease and related disorders.


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