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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Coors Peak Beer Now Certified Gluten-free

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.
    Coors Peak Beer Now Certified Gluten-free - Image: CC--MillerCoors
    Caption: Image: CC--MillerCoors

    Celiac.com 04/01/2015 - Coors Peak beer, a gluten-free copper lager, which hit store shelves in Seattle and Portland, is wasting no time in collecting accolades from gluten-free organizations.

    Image: CC--MillerCoorsMillerCoors recently announced that Coors Peak has become the first beer by the big three brewers to meet the certification standards set by the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America.



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    To ensure that Coors Peak is gluten-free, MillerCoors has employed exacting production standards, “including production in an entirely separate area to reduce the risk of cross-contamination,” said Channon Quinn, director of industry programs with the Gluten Intolerance Group.

    According to David Kroll, MillerCoors vice president of insights and innovations, it took five years of research, testing and refinement to develop Coors Peak, which is is brewed from malted brown rice, hops and caramel sugar to create a distinctive character and brightness.

    During that time, the Chicago-based company, which has a large brewing operation in Milwaukee, worked closely with the Gluten Intolerance Group to ensure high gluten-free standards.

    Read more at bizjournals.com.



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    Not all gluten-free beers are created equal - so is it any good? Has anyone tried it yet?

    I have tried it and so has my beer-drinking, recently diagnosed son. The result? We both REALLY like it. His friend (not gluten intolerant) did a blind taste test with Peak and regular Coors Light and he could not tell the difference. Finally a GOOD gluten-free beer!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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