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  • Jefferson Adams

    Could Egg Yolks Hold the Key to Celiac Disease Treatment?

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 08/12/2015 - There are numerous pills, enzymes, and other products in development that are all designed to provide moderate protection against accidental gluten exposure to people with celiac disease to gluten-intolerance.

    Photo: CC--Neil ConwayCan a new pill, which uses egg yolk antibodies to coat gluten, allowing it to pass from the body without harm, find a place on the crowded roster of contenders?



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    Driven by a desire to provide relief for people with celiac disease, Hoon Sunwoo, an associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences, has spent the last 10 years working on the proprietary pill.

    If Hoon has his way, people with celiac disease may soon be able to enjoy bread, pasta and other gluten products without suffering headaches, digestion problems and severe intestinal damage that come with the adverse gluten reactions of celiac disease.

    The pill works by using egg yolk antibodies to coat the gluten and allow it to pass from the body without doing any damage. While not a cure, Sunwoo's pill, now under development at the University of Alberta, may allow those people to join friends for a beer and pizza.

    Sunwoo makes it very clear that his pill is not a cure or long-term treatment solution, and the people with the disease should still follow a strict gluten-free diet.

    The pill is designed to be eaten by a person with celiac disease five minutes before eating or drinking, and would provide protection from an adverse gluten reaction for the next one or two hours.

    The pill completed safety clinical trials two months ago and is expected to begin efficacy clinical trials next year.

    Read more at CBC.CA.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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