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  • Jefferson Adams

    Cytokines Trigger Gut Reaction in People with Celiac Disease

    Jefferson Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      What's the relationship between systemic cytokine profiles and their connection to acute symptoms in celiac disease patients who eat gluten??


    Caption: Image: CC BY-SA 2.0--tylanarocks

    Celiac.com 08/19/2019 - Most gluten-free celiac patients will experience gastrointestinal symptoms within hours of gluten exposure. A number of studies have shown a connection between cytokines and adverse gluten-reactions.

    A team of researchers recently set out to examine systemic cytokine profiles and their connection to acute symptoms in celiac disease patients after reactivation of gluten immunity. To do this, the team carried out a series of multiplex cytokine measurements in celiac disease patients after a gluten challenge, both orally, and by injection. 



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    The research team included Gautam Goel, Jason A. Tye-Din, Shuo-Wang Qiao, Amy K. Russell, Toufic Mayassi, Cezary Ciszewski, Vikas K. Sarna, Suyue Wang, Kaela E. Goldstein, John L. Dzuris, Leslie J. Williams, Ramnik J. Xavier, Knut E. A. Lundin, Bana Jabri, Ludvig M. Sollid, and Robert P. Anderson.

    Patients receiving gluten by injection showed at least 15 elevated plasma cytokines, with IL-2, IL-8, and IL-10 being most common, with changes 272-fold, 11-fold, and 1.2-fold, respectively. IL-2 and IL-8 were the only cytokines elevated at 2 hours, prior to symptom onset. 

    After gluten ingestion, IL-2 was the earliest and most prominent cytokine, with a 15-fold change after 4 hours.

    Supported by studies of patient-derived gluten-specific T cell clones and primary lymphocytes, the team's observations indicate that celiac-associated gastrointestinal symptoms are likely caused by rapid reactivation of gluten-specific CD4+ T cells by gluten. This research may lead to new ways to diagnose and treat those with celiac disease.

    Stay tuned for more on this and related stories.

    Read more at: Science Advances 07 Aug 2019:Vol. 5, no. 8.
    DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw7756

     

    The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Immunology Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Parkville, VIC, Australia; the Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; the Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia; the Centre for Food and Allergy Research, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Parkville, VIC, Australia; the Department of Immunology and KG Jebsen Coeliac Disease Research Centre, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; the Department of Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; ImmusanT Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA; and the Department of Gastroenterology and KG Jebsen Coeliac Disease Research Centre, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.


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    Hello I have done a test and it came back negative. However within minutes of eating glu hfoods I have a migraine. The following morning I cannot get out of bed, as my joins are inflamed. For the next 7-8 days thereafter I am in pain. I subsequently also started getting seizures. In South Africa doctors are not informed about coeliac disease. Please advise on the test that I should request. 

    Kind Regards 

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    7 hours ago, Guest Yasmina Baker said:

    Hello I have done a test and it came back negative. However within minutes of eating glu hfoods I have a migraine. The following morning I cannot get out of bed, as my joins are inflamed. For the next 7-8 days thereafter I am in pain. I subsequently also started getting seizures. In South Africa doctors are not informed about coeliac disease. Please advise on the test that I should request. 

    Kind Regards 

    Here is information about the various blood tests available for celiac disease:

    https://www.verywellhealth.com/celiac-disease-blood-tests-562694

    Some celiacs are seronegative.  Some are also IgA deficient, which can impact tests.  In which case, an endoscopy Is commonly used to make a final diagnosis.  If you can not get medical support, you can trial the gluten free diet for at least six months.  

    You might also consider a wheat allergy which is different from celiac disease.  

    I wish you well.  

    Edited by cyclinglady

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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