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    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

    Dairy, Cow's Milk, Casein and Celiac Disease

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    The following is a post from Ron Hoggan - Q: I asked the doctor what an inflamed mucosa could mean and he shrugged and then added parasites, maybe? She was tested for parasites way back before her first biopsy (October 96).

    A: Have you tried eliminating dairy? Volta et. al. have demonstrated that 36% to 48% of celiacs tested were also intolerant to milk protein. Borner et. al. have demonstrated sequence homology, from the N-terminal, between casein and gliadin. The other three cited below are also identifying milk protein intolerances associated with celiac disease.



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    Playing the odds, exclusion of dairy is most likely to help. But there are other significant dietary allergens that might be eliminated if a dairy free diet, in addition to the Gluten-free diet, doesnt help.

    • Borner H, Isolation of antigens recognized by coeliac disease auto-antibodies and their use in enzyme immunoassay of endomysium and reticulin antibody-positive human sera. Clin Exp Immunol 106(2), 344-350 (1996)

    • Hvatum M, Serum IgG subclass antibodies to a variety of food antigens in patients with coeliac disease. Gut 33(5), 632-638 (1992)

    • Ciclitira PJ, Gliadin antibody production by small intestinal lymphocytes from patients with coeliac disease.Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 89(2-3), 246-249 (1989)

    • Volta U, Antibodies to dietary antigens in coeliac disease. Scand J Gastroenterol 21(8), 935-940 (1986)

    • Ciclitira PJ, Secretion of gliadin antibody by coeliac jejunal mucosal biopsies cultured in vitro. Clin Exp Immunol 64(1), 119-124 (1986)

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  • About Me

    As co-author of "Dangerous Grains" and "Cereal Killers", the study of the impact of gluten continues to be a driving passion in my life. I am fascinated by the way that gluten induces illness and impedes learning while it alters mood, behavior, and a host of other facets of our existence. Sure, the impact of gluten on health is an important issue, but that is only the most obvious area of impact. Mood disturbances, learning disabilities, and the loss of quality of life due to psychiatric and neurological illness are even more tragic than the plethora of physical ailments that are caused or worsened by gluten. The further I go down this rabbit hole, the more I realize that grains are a good food for ruminants - not people. I am a retired school teacher. Over the last decade, I have done some college and university level teaching, but the bulk of my teaching career was spent working with high school students. My Web page is: www.DangerousGrains.com


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