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  • Jefferson Adams

    Demand for Gluten-Free Food Products Drives Global Flour Market

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 12/18/2015 - Flour is a major global business, and flours of all kinds constitute a major part of the growing global food industry. Global flour markets are directly impacted by the growing processed food industry. Recent years have seen a notable expansion of the global flour market in terms of increased global demand and production capacity.

    Photo: CC--Michelangelo CarrieriFueled by changing customer preference, increased health concerns related to high-protein flours, rising urbanization, and per-capita income of the global population, Transparency Market Research expects the global flour market, valued at USD 182.66 billion in 2013, to reach 183,100.0 kilo tons in the next five years, growing at a CAGR of 3.8% to top USD 245.82 billion by 2020.



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    One of the big drivers of flour market growth is the rise in consumption of bread and bakery products and ready-to-eat (RTE) products in developing economies.

    Also, rising health concerns over high-protein flour provides an opportunity for flour millers to promote gluten-free, and low-protein variants of flours. The market for gluten-free products includes products such as breakfast cereals, gluten-free flour, snacks, and bakery products, among others.

    Considering that the demand for gluten-free variants of flour such as corn flour, soya flour, maize flour and rice flour is significant in the global market, analysts are projecting a strong rise in the popularity of gluten-free foods in the 2014-2020 forecast period.

    Browse Market Research Report of Flour Market.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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