Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Jefferson Adams

    Diagnostic Performance of IgG Anti-deamidated Gliadin Peptide Antibody Assays is Comparable to IgA Anti-tTG in Celiac Disease

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 03/25/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to compare the diagnostic performance of IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibody assays against IgA anti-tTG in celiac disease. The team included P. Vermeersch, K. Geboes, G. Mariën, I. Hoffman, M. Hiele, X. Bossuyt, all associated with the department of Laboratory Medicine, Immunology of University Hospitals at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    Using IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibody assays to test for celiac disease is more sensitive and more specific for celiac disease than detection of IgG antibodies against native gliadin. The team compared assessed the technical performance and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of commercial IgG anti-DGP assays from Euroimmun, Inova, Phadia and The Binding Site against other serologic assays for celiac disease, such as 3IgA and 2IgG anti-tTG assays, 1IgA and 1IgG anti-gliadin assay, 1IgA anti-DGP assay.

    For the study, they tested 86 patients with clinically proven celiac disease and 741 healthy control subjects. Technical performance of IgG anti-DGP assays as gauged by linearity, interference and imprecision, was within acceptable levels. IgG anti-DGP assay sensitivity ranged between 76.7% and 83.7% at the manufacturer's recommended cut-off, and between 74.4% and 84.9% at a cut-off that corresponded to a 98% specificity level. Specificity ranged between 97.3% and 99.3%.

    The diagnostic accuracy of the IgG anti-DGP assays was comparable to the diagnostic accuracy of the IgA anti-tTG assays. IgG anti-DGP assays showed significantly better than sensitivity than the IgG anti-tTG assays (p<0.05) and and significantly better specificity than IgA and IgG anti-gliadin assays (p<0.05).

    The four IgG anti-DGP assays all performed within acceptable limits, and diagnosed celiac disease with comparable accuracy as did the three IgA anti-tTG assays.

    Source:

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Vijay Kumar, MD, Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics
    I enjoyed reading J. Murrays comments related to the diagnosis of celiac disease and agree that taking multiple biopsies is still the gold standard of diagnosing celiac disease. However, I am sure he will agree that there are limitations in the histopathological methods of diagnosing celiac disease.
    As we know, histological features occur in continuum, with flat lesions at one end of the spectrum and a mucosa with normal villous and crypt architecture but abnormally high density or count of villous intraepithelial lymphocytes...

    Scott Adams
    J Autoimmun. 2004 Feb;22(1):65-72
    Celiac.com 01/29/2004 - A new cloning technique developed by Italian researchers may lead to more accurate diagnoses of celiac disease in borderline patients, including those who are asymptomatic. The technique screens for anti-tTG antibodies in the intestinal mucosa by utilizing a cloning process to amplify the antibodies, thus allowing for their detection even in cases where only minute amounts are present. The new technique is similar to that developed and long utilized by Dr. Kenneth Fine of Enterolab, in that both techniques look for the presence of antibodies in the intestinal mucosa rather than in the...

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 05/28/2010 - Celiac disease research is linking Irritable Bowel Syndrome with gluten intolerance and doctors are recommending IBS sufferers, especially those with diarrhea-predominant IBS, to get tested for gluten issues or celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. The source of this being gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, often affecting the entire body and manifesting various physical and mental symptoms, and a gluten-free diet is the simple treatment for this disease.
    New research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine has shown that people with IBS are four times more likely to have celiac disease...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2011 - In an effort to improve diagnosis of celiac disease in patients already on a gluten-free diet, a team of researchers recently evaluated HLA-DQ2-gliadin tetramers for detection of gluten-specific T cells in peripheral blood and histological changes in the duodenum after a short gluten challenge as a diagnostic tool.
    The study team included Margit Brottveit MD, Melinda Ráki MD, PhD, Elin Bergseng MScPharm, PhD, Lars-Egil Fallang MSc, PhD, Bjørg Simonsen BLS, Astrid Løvik MSc, Stig Larsen MSc, PhD, Else Marit Løberg MD, PhD, Frode L Jahnsen MD, PhD, Ludvig M Sollid MD, PhD, and Knut EA Lundin MD, PhD.
    They are associated var...