Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Scott Adams

    Does Distillation Remove All Gluten?

    Scott Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.   eNewsletter: Get our eNewsletter

    Frederik Willem Janssen is head of the Chemistry Department, Food Inspection Service in Zutphen, and a subsidiary of the Inspector of Health Protection (similar to the FDA in America). Their lab has a special interest in.... modified gluten, edible packaging materials (which may contain gluten), and detection of hidden gluten in foods, including the development of improved detection methods. He is also a member of the Medical/Scientific Advisory Committee of the Dutch Celiac Society.

    Distillation quite effectively removes the gluten and it is very unlikely that splashes of fermented (we call it "moutwijn", i.e. malt wine, can’t remember the correct English word for it) will be carried over to the final distillate. If they are present they must have been added afterwards. A couple of years ago we analyzed some distilled liquor for presence of gluten proteins but we couldn’t detect any in this set (about 40 different types). The beer test, which consisted of a set of 50 different brands, showed that most brands (35) did contain immunoreactive protein in amounts between 1 and 200 mg/liter. Only 15 contained less than 1 mg/liter. There was a strong correlation between the gluten content and whether wheat had been used as an ingredient!



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):




    I found a report in a periodical by the Flemish Celiac Society of an investigation that was published in 1992 about immunological determination of gluten in beer and some distilled liquor. This confirmed our findings that the gluten content of beer is quite variable (the authors found levels from zero to 400 mg /liter gluten).

    They did find gluten in distilled liquor! The levels varied from zero to 200-mg gluten/liter. The highest amount was found in a "Creme de Framboise" (200 mg/liter) but second was a French brandy VSOP with a score of 180 m g/liter. A Dutch gin was negative, which might be an indication that gluten in these type of liquor is not a carry over to the distillate! My guess is that this gluten is derived from the caramel coloring, though there is no proof about this yet. I always advise sensitive patients to abstain from brown colored liquor!

    I would like to stress that the determination of gluten in these types of products is very unreliable and we have to count with false positive as well as false negative values. The gluten proteins could have been broken down to small (but still toxic) peptides and in that case a sandwich-type ELISA might produce false negative results because in that case you always need to two epitopes (binding sites for the antiserum) on one molecule to get a positive reaction. A competitive type assay would be the choice for this type of product, but we haven’t tried this type of analysis yet. We did use it on a soy sauce, which was prepared with wheat gluten and didn’t find any gliadin, which might be an indication that gluten had been broken down to very small peptides with less than one binding site.

    Best wishes,
    Frederik Willem Janssen, Zutpen, The Netherlands. 

     

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    This still leaves me wondering if the grain alcohol in Pam Spray or any other product such as Vanilla, Allmond extracts contain gluten.

    Can you Help!!!!! Thank you Pam

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    This still leaves me wondering if the grain alcohol in Pam Spray or any other product such as Vanilla, Allmond extracts contain gluten.

    Can you Help!!!!! Thank you Pam

    I'd like to hear the answer to Pam's question, too. (on 19 Jan 2008). Thanks

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I do not risk consuming anything that was once wheat or still is. I have drank many types of alcohol and have had the same painful wheat symptoms. My grandmother said to me once, "You do not need alcohol to have a good time!"

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    There is zero doubt in my mind that cheap alcohol distilled from grain still contains some amount of gluten. I get terrible and immediate reactions.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    This statement is being distributed by Sapporo Breweries:
    "A representative from Sapporo Breweries, Ltd./Tokyo has advised that Sapporo beer does contain barley. However, after the barley is boiled, the gluten is filtered out along with the barley skins. The representative assured me that although the barley itself does contain gluten, their brewing process effectively...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/09/2012 - Among many gluten-free catholics, there's been a good deal of excitement lately about low-gluten and gluten-free communion wafers for Mass in the Catholic church.
    However, much of that excitement seems to have been misplaced, at least in Ohio. That's because the Catholic Diocese of Columbus recently said that gluten-free wafers don’t meet Vatican standards b...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/24/2013 - Gwyneth Paltrow is gluten-free and on a publicity swing as part of her role in Iron Man 3 this spring.
    In an interview in Self magazine, Oscar winner Gwyneth Paltrow spoke a bit about the benefits of eating gluten-free, and about her gluten-free cook book due out next month.
    The 40-year old actor explained how giving up gluten has changed her life...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/02/2014 - Depending on who is making the calculations, the market for gluten-free foods has either peaked, or will continue to rise over the next five years.
    According to Packaged Facts, the gluten-free (gluten-free) market has peaked. And in the past two years, it has failed to attract new users.
    Symphony IRI reports that growth rates of key label claims ...