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  • Jefferson Adams

    Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira Test New Celiac Disease Drug

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 04/24/2015 - Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira recently announced the start of phase I clinical trials for the drug candidate ZED1227, a direct acting inhibitor of tissue transglutaminase.

    Image: Dr. Falk Co.The small molecule targets the dysregulated transglutaminase within the small intestine in order to dampen the immune response to gluten which drives the disease process. This approach will offer patients additional safety when applied in support of a ‘mostly’ gluten-free diet thereby improving the quality-of-life of millions of people.



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    In 2011, Dr. Falk Pharma licensed the rights for ZED1227 in Europe and took charge of pre-clinical and clinical development of the new drug. The license agreement secured Zedira an upfront payment and further milestone payments as well as royalties. The rights outside Europe are jointly owned by the partners.

    The project receives additional support through a grant from the German Ministry for Education and Research within the Cluster of Excellence program “Ci3-Cluster for Individualized Immune Intervention."

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    ?? This approach will offer patients additional safety when applied in support of a ‘mostly' gluten-free diet thereby improving the quality-of-life of millions of people.

    What does this really mean, and will it be of any consequence?

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    Guest Jefferson Adams

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    ?? This approach will offer patients additional safety when applied in support of a ‘mostly' gluten-free diet thereby improving the quality-of-life of millions of people.

    What does this really mean, and will it be of any consequence?

    This drug, and several others under development, are designed to offer people with celiac disease additional protection against accidental gluten contamination/ingestion.

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    It is hard to avoid gluten cross-contamination so this could address the 'mostly' gluten free diet.

     

    I am wondering if this would help those that have not been diagnosed as celiac and may be just gluten intolerant. Also, would one have to be diagnosed as celiac to get this prescribed?

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    Encouraging to hear that drugs are being tested to protect against accidental gluten ingestion -- the biggest threat. I don't think anyone expects to be able to order a cinnamon roll or pizza without consequences ... but to eat out with the usual gluten-free precautions and not worry about a careless cross contamination incident would be life changing.

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    Crazy. Here is a problem easily treated without medication. Now lets have a drug, like all of the others that will of course be your highest copay if released and I have no doubt will require priorauthorization. Typical to just fix everything with a pill.

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    ?? This approach will offer patients additional safety when applied in support of a ‘mostly' gluten-free diet thereby improving the quality-of-life of millions of people.

    What does this really mean, and will it be of any consequence?

    It means that if this is released it will no doubt be your highest insurance copay if covered at all for a problem that is easily treated without medication. If covered it will require prior authorization by insurance and in addition to buying expensive gluten free products you can add a large monthly copay for a pill.

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    Crazy. Here is a problem easily treated without medication. Now lets have a drug, like all of the others that will of course be your highest copay if released and I have no doubt will require priorauthorization. Typical to just fix everything with a pill.

    Do you have celiac, if not, you have no idea what being gluten free cost to people who have this condition. To only eat under the purest kitchen possible. To know positively you can safely eat out with out becoming ill all over again... like starting over.. Yes, my husband will take a pill just as he does for his blood pressure and just like he does for his cholesterol!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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