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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Dunkin Ditches Gluten-free Donuts

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 02/10/2014 - Dunkin' Donuts is quietly ditching its much publicized, much anticipated campaign to introduce gluten-free donuts across the nation.

    Photo: CC--Robert BanhInformation is scant, as Dunkin' has not issued any official press release. Dunkin' Donuts did, however, release the following statement to Gluten-Free Living:

    "In 2013, we tested a gluten-free Cinnamon Sugar Donut and Blueberry Muffin in select markets. We are currently assessing the results of this test, as well as feedback from our guests and franchisees, and we do not have plans to launch these products nationally at this time. We are continuing to develop additional gluten-free products for future tests, and we remain committed to exploring ways to offer our guests gluten-free choices."

    Word is that the rollout was doomed partly by complaints about the quality of the gluten-free donuts Dunkin' was offering, among other issues.

    We will do our best to keep you updated on this and other gluten-free stories.

    In the meantime, what do you think of the news? Is it better to not do gluten-free at all than to do it poorly? Are you disappointed? Share your comments below.

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    I am extremely disappointed - although I am not myself a donut eater - the blueberry muffin was what I had my eye on.

    More than that I am sad that a national company is not going to provide an alternative to those of us who do no eat gluten - no matter the cause - Dunkin' Donuts you have really set back the cause of providing gluten free alternative rather than taking a leadership role. I am sure if you went the muffin route and other "bread or cake" routes we would be happy to have the alternative when we come in for coffee. I am very disappointed in your "give up" attitude rather than choosing to us an alternative with muffins.

    Your were a leader in my mind - now you are giving up rather than going to Plan B. Gluten free foods can be tasty .

    A sorely disappointed gluten free family!

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    I read of Dunkin' Donuts' gluten-free doughnut with interest, but was highly skeptical and am not surprised to find that it failed. I am a life-long foodie about three years into a celiac diagnosis. My conclusion, after tasting lots of gluten-free baked goods, is that I would rather bake/buy authentically, originally gluten-free baked goods (meringues, macaroons, flourless chocolate cake, etc.) and then cheat once every three months with a real piece of pizza, cake, or brownie, than chase the promise of gluten-free baked goods every day of the week and face constant disappointment. With very VERY few exceptions, I do not believe it is possible to make a fluffy, stretchy, moist, light, and tasty baked good -- pizza crust, muffin, sourdough bread, cake, etc. -- without using wheat. That makes me sad, but sorry folks, it's the truth.

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    It is a little disappointing. DD regular baked good were never anything to go out of ones way for. You can better baked goods (gluten-free and with G) at most grocery stores now.

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    Their gluten-free donuts were not very good, especially for the price.

     

    The muffins were good, though a bit pricey. But the fact they were sealed and separate from the rest of the products was nice.

     

    Would actually love it if they had gluten-free bagels....

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    Although I am not a huge donut or muffin person, I do on occasion enjoy having a donut or muffin, especially if I am running late. Time crunch is usually when I need a gluten-free option the most, and that is when it is the hardest to find a gluten free choice. With the growth of celiac disease and even those who choose gluten free as an lifestyle, many restaurants and fast food chains are missing the boat on this. Limited options in dining out are one of the reasons many find living gluten-free so hard.

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    I am too disappointed that they have temporarily chosen to excel in this field. Granted doing gluten-free is a bit tricky at times. I would rather they regroup and try again than to put out a bad donut/product. They have high standards for themselves and they should have them with gluten-free doughnuts too. Hey, I would LOVE a good donut once in a while. I haven't had a really good one in 17 years. Most of them too dry or contain GM corn or milk products in them too. So if your multi-allergic like me...and many are...you don't get donuts.

    Good for you for re-grouping and trying to get it right. I love that. I would rather have it be an awesome donut than a dry, flavorless product. Here is to hoping for the best.

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    It is disappointing that they can't come up with a product that tastes good. General Mills managed to come up with gluten free cereals (Chex) that is wonderful. Please keep trying.

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    It is disappointing that they can't come up with a product that tastes good. General Mills managed to come up with gluten free cereals (Chex) that is wonderful. Please keep trying.

    GM didn't exactly come up with Rice Chex...they only had to make 1 substitution to get rid of barley malt for a gluten-free sweetener.

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    I read of Dunkin' Donuts' gluten-free doughnut with interest, but was highly skeptical and am not surprised to find that it failed. I am a life-long foodie about three years into a celiac diagnosis. My conclusion, after tasting lots of gluten-free baked goods, is that I would rather bake/buy authentically, originally gluten-free baked goods (meringues, macaroons, flourless chocolate cake, etc.) and then cheat once every three months with a real piece of pizza, cake, or brownie, than chase the promise of gluten-free baked goods every day of the week and face constant disappointment. With very VERY few exceptions, I do not believe it is possible to make a fluffy, stretchy, moist, light, and tasty baked good -- pizza crust, muffin, sourdough bread, cake, etc. -- without using wheat. That makes me sad, but sorry folks, it's the truth.

    Apparently you don't take being a celiac seriously enough if you are cheating every three months with a wheat product. Do you understand what you are doing to your body by doing that? Your choice....

    That being said - after eating gluten-free for over 30 years I can tell you there are plenty of recipes that will give you cakes, muffins, macaroons, and yes pizzas that taste just as good as they did with the wheat.

    You need to make a commitment to your body that you want it to live and not want to kill it off - and you will go searching for these wonderful recipes 'foodie' and you will soon discover that wheat is not all that it's cracked up to be.

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    I am a grandmother of a celiac so I know the trials and tribulations that she goes through. We were both so much looking forward to a breakthrough of a gluten-free donut, not only so much to provide for a gluten-free donut but as an encouragement to the food industry to provide more delicious tasting gluten-free foods. It has not been an easy road because it is a struggle to find products that taste "almost" normal. I remember when my grandchild was diagnosed with celiac in high school she cried, "But, I am a teenager part of enjoying being in high school is getting together and eating pizza with everyone." I encourage the food industry to look at how profitable it would be to them to produce good tasting gluten-food products at a reasonable price. All mothers and grandmothers of celiacs, and celiacs, will agree with me!!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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