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    Scott Adams

    Enzyme and Sulfur Oxidization Deficiencies in Autistic Children with Known Food/Chemical Intolerance

    Scott Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    The following was taken from AUTISM 95:



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    The following was written about a study: to determine whether children with autism and known food/chemical intolerance have a deficiency of phenol-sulphotransferase-P enzyme and/or a low capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. On the results obtained so far, all 18 children have a low enzyme level, and some have a low capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. This enzyme metabolizes phenols and amines. Therefore, with a reduced level, these children will be unable to fully metabolize foods and chemicals which contain phenols (and amines)...

    ...The majority of children in this category ... have allergy to or intolerance of many foods/chemicals, the main offenders being wheat, cows milk, and salicylates. Their family histories show asthma, eczema, migraines, hay fever, plus many other allergy-related conditions...Their siblings display learning difficulties, dyslexia, etc.....

    In autism and other disorders we suspect a peptidase deficiency so that proteins are not broken down into individual amino acids and these short, biologically active chains (peptides) exist in appreciable quantities. Even in the normal gut there will be some of these substances but they are not normally a problem. If the gut wall is leaky (celiac disease or lack of sulfur transferase, etc) these compounds will get into the bloodstream. Even then there should be no serious problem unless they enter the blood...

    ...The brain is protected by the blood brain barrier (BBB) which is partly physical and partly chemical in nature. Thus this would keep peptides out unless there are huge quantities circulating.

    So when the intestinal wall is not healthy and the brain is vulnerable, the brain is affected directly. Learning disabilities, behavioral problems, and even extremes such as schizophrenic behavior can result. The three things which happen are:

    • Not Enough Enzymes To Fully Digest Particular Protein Chains
    • A Breachable Intestinal Wall
    • A Vulnerable Brain
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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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