Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Jefferson Adams

    Evaluation of IVE/MTX-ASCT treatment for cases of EATL

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Potential treatment for T-cell lymphoma
    Caption: Potential treatment for T-cell lymphoma

    Celiac.com 06/14/2010 - Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare type of for which there are currently no standardized diagnostic or treatment protocols.

    A team of researchers recently evaluated enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma and compared standard therapies with a novel regimen including autologous stem cell transplantation



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    The research  team included Michal Sieniawski, Nithia Angamuthu, Kathryn Boyd, Richard Chasty, John Davies, Peter Forsyth, Fergus Jack, Simon Lyons, Philip Mounter, Paul Revell, Stephen J. Proctor, and Anne L. Lennard.

    The team describe EATL in a population-based setting and evaluates a new treatment with aggressive chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT).

    In 1979, the Scotland and Newcastle Lymphoma Group began to collect data on all patients newly diagnosed with lymphoma in the Northern Region of England and Scotland.

    The research team reviewed the records of patients diagnosed with EATL from 1994 and 1998. 54 patients had features of EATL. The overall annual rate was 0.14/100,000.

    Doctors treated 35 patients with systemic chemotherapy (mainly anthracycline-based chemotherapy) and with surgery. They treated 19 patients with surgery alone. Patients showed a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 3.4 months and overall survival (OS) of 7.1 months.

    Starting in 1998 patients eligible for intensive treatment received the novel regimen IVE/MTX (ifosfamide, vincristine, etoposide/methotrexate)–ASCT, with a total 26 patients included. PFS and OS at the five year mark were 52% and 60%, respectively, a substantial improvement over the historical group treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy (P .01 and P .003, respectively).

    In contrast to the poor outcomes when treated with conventional therapies, the IVE/MTX-ASCT regimen offers acceptable toxicity and significantly improved outcome for cases of EATL.

    Researchers are affiliated variously with the Department of Haematological Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne; the Department of Haematology, Craigavon Area Hospital, Portadown; the Department of Haematology, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Stoke on Trent; the Department of Haematology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh; the Department of Haematology, Raigmore Hospital, Inverness; the Department of Haematology, Harbour Hospital, Poole; the Department of Haematology, Sunderland Royal Hospital, Sunderland; the Department of Haematology, University Hospital of North Tees, Stockton on Tees; and the Department of Haematology, Staffordshire General Hospital, Stafford, United Kingdom

    Source:

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    The following Medline abstract describes a unique study that was done on the quality of life of two groups of people with celiac disease: One that was diagnosed as the result of having symptoms, and the other which had little or no symptoms and whose diagnosis was reached via screen-detection. Both groups were treated for one year with a gluten-free diet, and were then studied to determine their overall response, including their psychological response. Here is the abstract:
    Eff Clin Pract 2002 May-Jun;5(3):105-13
    Mustalahti K, Lohiniemi S, Collin P, Vuolteenaho N, Laippala P, Maki M.
    Department of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital...

    Diana Gitig Ph.D.
    Celiac.com 05/25/2011 - Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, diagnosing it often takes an inordinately long time. A serological test positive for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and symptoms, and that patients should be spared it; others claim that the onset of celiac disease can predate the occurrence of villous atrophy, yielding a falsely...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/04/2013 - Ever wonder what happens to all those celiac disease patients who volunteer to do a gluten-challenge in the name of science? Well, the short answer is that they likely suffer, and may incur gut damage, at least in the short term.
    A team of researchers looking for ways to reduce or eliminate that problem recently conducted a study using larazotide acetate, a first-in-class oral peptide that prevents tight junction opening, and may reduce gluten uptake and associated problems.
    The research team included C. P. Kelly, P. H. R. Green, J. A. Murray, A. DiMarino, A. Colatrella, D. A. Leffler, T. Alexander, R. Arsenescu, F. Leon...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/03/2014 - Celiac disease patients in Australia have shown a major improvement in gluten tolerance after receiving experimental hookworm treatments. The study is part of an effort to determine if parasitic helminths, such as hookworm, might help to treat inflammatory disorders, including celiac disease.
    In this case, the research team assessed the influence of experimental hookworm infection on the predicted outcomes of three escalating gluten challenges in volunteers with confirmed celiac disease.
    The research team included John Croese, MD, Paul Giacomin, PhD, Severine Navarro, PhD, Andrew Clouston, MD, Leisa McCann, RN, Annette Dougall...