Jump to content



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Facing Legal Pressure, More Colleges Provide Gluten-free Food Options

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 03/29/2013 - Parents of children with food allergies can take heart in recent developments at the federal level that are mandating changes in the ways colleges and universities address food-allergy issues in their students.

    Photo: CC--wallygA recent federal civil rights settlement between the Department of Justice and Lesley University that arose from Lesley's failure to provide gluten-free food shows that traditional one-style-fits-all dining options are no longer an ­option for our institutions of higher learning.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    The settlement requires Lesley to “continually provide” students with gluten-free dining options and pay $50,000 in damages to ensure the university is in compliance with a federal law that protects people with disabilities.

    As a result, more and more universities are scrambling to make safe food alternatives available to students with severe food allergies, including those with celiac disease, as required by the under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    This adjustment includes gluten-free food offerings, and colleges and universities in Massachusetts are among the first to attempt the adjustment. Their approaches differ slightly, but the goal is to provide a safe, reliable dining experience to students with food allergies.

    The University of Massachusetts Boston and Boston University have created gluten-free zones in cafeterias and food courts, while others are taking a more individual approach. Tufts and Harvard University, for example, are having nutritionists and dining hall staff work with students to figure out what prepared foods can and cannot be eaten and ordering specialty items as necessary.

    Tufts' plan also includes establishing a dedicated freezer-refrigerator unit in its two dining halls that is stocked with gluten-free foods. The units are kept locked, and only students with special dietary needs are given keys

    UMass Amherst publishes dining hall menus online, and identifies gluten-free offerings with a special icon. The school also has an extensive handout on what foods to avoid and whom to contact if students need gluten-free food.

    About a year ago, UMass Boston created a gluten-free zone in its food court, with a dedicated refrigerator, microwave, and toaster to minimize the risk of contamination.

    Look for the trend to continue as more and more colleges deal with the new legal realities of feeding students who have food allergies.

    Sources:



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I would say that the biggest challenge colleges and universities will face (other than cross-contamination) will be students who don't understand the necessity that the appliances remain totally dedicated for those students with food issues. Will the dining room(s) for those with food issues be locked, and only those with issues will be allowed to use them? Will friends who don't have issues be allowed to dine with those who do? Will those same friends adhere to the strict necessity of no cross-contamination of either the food or the appliances? I didn't have to worry about food issues in college because I didn't discover my gluten intolerance until I was older. But I would have pushed to be allowed/able to afford to live off campus, in my own space, so that I could have controlled my own food and appliances. But even if a student can afford their own place, they will still need to be able to grab a snack to go--and that snack needs to conform to what they can/cannot have. I applaud the fact that more attention is being paid to this issue.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/15/2010 - Until the present study, no clinical research had been published regarding the relative effects of clinical and psychosocial variables on outcome in celiac disease.
    A team of researchers examined psychosocial factors that may influence disease activity in celiac patients, such as relationships among demographics, psychosocial factors, and disease activity with health-related quality of life (HRQOL), health care utilization, and symptoms.
    The research team included Spencer D. Dorn, Lincoln Hernandez, Maria T. Minaya, Carolyn B. Morris, Yuming Hu, Suzanne Lewis, Jane Leserman, Shrikant I. Bangdiwala, Peter H. R. Green and Douglas A. Drossman of the Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.
    The team enrolled 101 adult patients with celiac disease with the goal of charting any relationships among demographics, psychosocial factors, and disease activity with health-related quality of life (HRQOL), health care utilization, and symptoms. All patients were newly referred to a tertiary care center with biopsy-proven celiac disease.
    The team examined: (a) demographic factors and diet status; ( disease measures (Marsh score, tissue transglutaminase antibody (tTG) level, weight change and additional blood studies); and © Psychosocial status (psychological distress, life stress, abuse history, and coping). They then conducted multivariate analyses to predict HRQOL, daily function, self-reported health, number of physician visits, and GI symptoms, such as pain and diarrhea.
    They found that patients with psychological distress and poor coping skills suffered from impaired HRQOL and daily function.
    Patients who reported poorer health generally showed poorer coping, longer symptom duration, lower education, and greater weight loss. Patients with poorer coping, abnormal tTG levels, and milder Marsh classification generally had more physician visits.
    Patients with higher psychological distress and greater weight loss also showed higher pain scores. Patients with greater psychological distress and poorer coping also showed higher rates of diarrhea.
    Their results show that among patients at celiac disease referral centers, psychosocial factors have a greater impact on health status and GI symptoms than does disease activity. Such factors should be considered as part of the patient's treatment and prognosis.
    Source:

    Dig Dis Sci. 2010 Jul 30. DOI: 10.1007/s10620-010-1342-y


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/31/2012 - Barley is used to make most traditionally brewed commercial beer, but whether the finished product contains significant amounts of gluten has remained unresolved.
    A number of breweries have been labeling certain of their barley-brewed beers as 'low gluten." The breweries have contended that the brewing process eliminates or reduces the gluten content in beer to levels that make it acceptable for people with sensitivity to gluten.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, a recent study of sixty commercial beers has debunked the idea that the beer brewing process eliminates gluten or reduces it to levels insignificant for people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance.
    Beers tested in a new study, including some brands labeled "low-gluten," contain hordein, the form of gluten found in barley, at levels that could trigger symptoms in patients with celiac disease, according to researchers.
    You can find the full study to address this controversy over the gluten content of beer in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research.
    In their article, Michelle Colgrave and colleagues explain that celiac disease affects over than 2 million people worldwide.
    They explain that their study faced an initial challenge because  detecting gluten in malted products using existing tests was difficult, as the tests were largely inaccurate. So the scientists developed a highly accurate new test for hordein, the gluten component in barley-based beers.
    As many expected, their analysis of 60 commercial beers found that eight labeled "gluten-free" did not contain gluten. All eight of the commercial beers labeled 'gluten-free' were, in fact, gluten-free.
    But most regular, commercial beers had significant levels of gluten. Most alarming was that discovery that the two beers labeled as "low-gluten" each contained about as much gluten as a regular beer.
    With the market for gluten-free products continuing to expand rapidly, it is no surprise that products may slip onto the market which are targeted at people with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance, but which actually contain levels of gluten that are unacceptable and potentially harmful to people who are sensitive to the proteins.
    The problem is partly compounded by a lack of consistent standards for what constitutes "gluten-free," or what levels best address the needs of people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance.
    That leaves the burden for making decisions about what products are safe or not safe largely up to consumers, who must rely on a loose patchwork of manufacturers and product certification organizations that are, hopefully, knowledgeable, scientific and reliable. When science is hazy, room exists for spurious.
    The lesson here is that commercial gluten-free beers seem to be genuinely gluten-free, and safe for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance, while anything labeled 'low gluten' is potentially bad news.
    Source:
    ACS' Journal of Proteome Research


    Sheila Hughes
    Celiac.com 05/29/2013 - Television's the Disney Channel has always been known to be kid friendly and parents approved, but a recent airing has parents viewing this network in a new light.
    "Jessie," a fairly new sitcom, premiered on September 30, 2011. It follows the life of an eighteen year old who nannies for a high profile family of four children. Seemingly harmless, right? In a recent episode titled “Quitting Cold Koala,” Stuart, a gluten-free child, is victimized. Several jokes were made in reference to the character's diet such as, "You call me sweetie again, and you'll be eating some gluten-free knuckles." In another part of the episode another child throws pancakes at Stuart as he screams "gluten!" and wipes his face.
    Those who are diagnosed with celiac disease must live a completely gluten-free life. Gluten is a very common protein which is found in foods made with wheat, rye, and barely. When ingested their immune system literally starts destroying them from the inside out.
    Amy Raslevich, was outraged by the episode in question when she watched it with her two gluten-free children. She was quoted in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette saying, "There were tears in my daughter's eyes, and my son's fist was clenched.” She started her own petition on Change.org asking the Disney Channel to no longer air this episode.
    Disney has made the decision to pull this episode for now, and is currently re-evaluating whether it will be shown again.
    Source:
    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57585388/disney-pulls-jessie-episode-that-makes-fun-of-gluten-free-child/


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/17/2014 - What's up with wheat producers and product manufacturers? Wheat sales are flat, gluten-free is through the roof, and the industry is mum.
    Though under 1 percent of Americans suffer from celiac disease, nearly one in three people say they are eating gluten-free, according to NPD Group. Consumption of flour in the U.S. is at a 22-year low, says the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
    And rather than leaping to the defense of wheat, or loudly touting its benefits, companies including General Mills (GIS) and Kellogg (K) are creating pricier gluten-free versions of their products, while leaving industry groups to defend their regular fare. The U.S. market for gluten-free foods will climb from $4.2 billion in 2012 to $6.6 billion by 2017, according to researcher Packaged Facts.
    Overall sales of the seven Chex varieties without gluten are up by at least 10 percent in each of the past three fiscal years, while the $6 billion breakfast cereal category has remained flat.
    The combination of flat sales of traditional wheat-containing cereal products, and the dramatic rise in sales of gluten-free products has presented a challenge for manufacturers that make both products that contain gluten, and other products that are gluten-free.
    If they are too loud about touting the benefits of gluten-free products, they risk slippage on their wheat based products, and vice versa.
    When it comes to dealing with flash trends, says Mark Lang, a food marketing professor at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, the manufacturing industry typically has "nothing to gain, and you have everything to lose.”
    So, at the same time General Mills has been careful not to push wheat, it has also been careful not to align itself with any of the anti-gluten figures.
    When asked if General Mills has been slow to respond to the incursion of gluten into traditional wheat territory, company spokeswoman Kirstie Foster says that the company is responding as they think best.
    If you think about it, General Mills' strategy might not be too bad. If they can sell more gluten-free grains and products at premium prices, then the decline in wheat consumption might not have such a negative impact on their bottom line.
    Still, the lukewarm defense of wheat by grain producers comes as a surprises to Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma and other books on nutrition.
    “The industry has been flat-footed in their response,” he says. “They should be reminding people that gluten is protein, generally thought of as a healthy nutrient compared to fats or carbs.”
    Source: Businessweek 


  • Popular Now

×
×
  • Create New...