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  • Jefferson Adams

    Fast, Accurate Portable Gluten Sensor in Development

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 06/26/2014 - Imagine being able to go to a party, or a restaurant, and test any food on your plate for gluten.

    Photo: CC--Wikimedia Commons--skatebikerA company called 6SensorLabs is developing a gluten sensor based on existing protein sensing technology that is already commercially available and proven to work. The company is looking to design a gluten test that can be used with all types of food.



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    The portable test would work by placing a sample of food would be placed in a disposable pod and placing the pod in a sensor.

    Once activated, the device would tell you, in two minutes or less, if the food sample contained any gluten over the FDA standard of 20 ppm gluten or more.

    The sensor could also be used to detect gluten in any packaged foods.

    The sensor is designed to test a specific section of food on your plate, or a sauce, soup or liquid. It would not be able to detect traces of gluten that might be hiding somewhere else on your plate.

    While the product would have its limits in this respect, it would give users the ability to detect gluten in many cases.

    Would you want such a tool? Would it be helpful for you?

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    If it's no larger than a small cell phone, uses AA or AAA batteries, is silent and odorless, costs no more than a hundred dollars, and if the disposable pods are no more than three dollars apiece, I'd be interested. If it had more quantification-- 5, 10, 15, 20, >20 ppm-- I'd be more interested. It would have to handle rye and barley "glutens" as well as that from wheat.

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    "The sensor is designed to test a specific section of food on your plate, or a sauce, soup or liquid. It would not be able to detect traces of gluten that might be hiding somewhere else on your plate." WHAT DOES THIS MEAN???

     

    In short, make it a phone-compatible app so that everyone has the means at their disposal with minimal financial investment.

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    How soon can I buy it? This weekend I didn't trust my waiter after discussing my gluten allergy. I'd have loved to be able to test for gluten when my meal was served.

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    YES! Ditto to what Dick L. and Cathy Green said....something like this would be GREAT especially for my daughter who is heading off to college this fall...where they say they offer gluten free foods in their dining halls BUT they cannot guarantee that all food service workers understand proper handling of gluten-free foods...which means that the gluten-free foods may be cross-contaminated...UGH....talk about frustration!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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