Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Celiac.com Sponsor:


Celiac.com Sponsor:


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    FODMAPs, Food Intolerance and You

    Jefferson Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 02/13/2015 - Food intolerance is non-immunological and is often accompanied by gastrointestinal symptoms. 

    Image: Wikimedia Commons--BlausenWhat can a review of scientific literature teach us about the causes, diagnosis, mechanisms and clinical evidence regarding food intolerance and gastrointestinal symptoms? Researcher M. C. E. Lomer recently set out to critically analyze the scientific literature related to etiology, diagnosis, mechanisms and clinical evidence as it relates to food intolerance.



    Celiac.com Sponsor:




    To do so, Lomer searched Pubmed, Embase and Scopus for the terms and variants of food intolerance, lactose, FODMAP, gluten, food chemicals. He restricted his search to human studies published in English. Lomer also conducted a physical search for references to these terms from relevant papers and appropriate studies.

    By Lomer’s assessment, food intolerance affects 15–20% of the population and may be due to pharmacological effects of food ingredients, non-celiac gluten sensitivity or defects in enzyme and transport.

    One area researchers now have a bit more solid scientific data about is the role of short-chain fermentable carbohydrates (FODMAPs) in causing gastrointestinal food intolerance. Food exclusion followed by gradual food reintroduction is the best way to diagnose such food intolerance, and to relieve symptoms.

    There is increasing evidence to support the use of a low FODMAP diet to manage gastrointestinal symptoms in cases of suspected food intolerance. A low FODMAP diet is effective, but changes gastrointestinal microbiota, so reintroducing FODMAPs to the point of tolerance is part of the overall management strategy.

    Exclusionary diets should be as brief as possible. They should be just long enough to induce symptom improvement. They should then be followed by gradual food reintroduction to establish individual tolerance.

    This will help to increase dietary variety, ensure nutritional adequacy and minimize impact on the gastrointestinal microbiota.

    Source:


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I was recently put on a Low FODMAP diet by my gastroenterologist. I am also celiac. I find that I have not had great success with this Low FODMAP diet which is extremely restrictive and limits the ability to eat outside my own kitchen.

    I am still reintroducing foods, but other than lactose, for me this diet has not proved valuable.

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I guess I don't understand. I have celiac disease and any and I mean any gluten and I am sick for weeks. It's been 14 months since I started my gluten free diet. Just how long before I am supposed to reintroduce gluten into my diet. The truth is I am terrified of the idea of reintroducing gluten.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    I guess I don't understand. I have celiac disease and any and I mean any gluten and I am sick for weeks. It's been 14 months since I started my gluten free diet. Just how long before I am supposed to reintroduce gluten into my diet. The truth is I am terrified of the idea of reintroducing gluten.

    Someone with celiac disease would never re-introduce gluten into their diet.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    This article appeared in the Autumn 2007 edition of Celiac.com's Scott-Free Newsletter.
    Celiac.com 03/10/2008 - Virtually every parent and every professional person who works with children wants to see them learn, grow, and achieve to the greatest extent of their potential.  The vast majority of these caregivers know that nutrition plays an enormous role in each child’s re...

    Sayer Ji
    Approximately 70% of all American calories come from a combination of the following four foods: wheat, dairy, soy and corn - assuming, that is, we exclude calories from sugar.
    Were it true that these four foods were health promoting, whole-wheat-bread-munching, soy-milk-guzzling, cheese-nibbling, corn-chip having Americans would probably be experiencing exemplary health among...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/05/2012 - As more people seek out affordable medical services in foreign countries, the variety of available medical services continues to grow. Stem cells are just the latest in the list of medical services being targeted at foreign visitors.
    A company called MediCAREtourism, a division of an Oman-based travel and hospitality company called Travel Point LLC, is...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/25/2014 - Nine out of ten wheat crops around the globe are susceptible to a killer fungus that attacks wheat. The pathogen is Puccinia rust fungus. Puccinia triticina causes 'black rust', P.recondita causes 'brown rust' and P.striiformis causes 'Yellow rust'.
    Originally named Ug99, but now known as wheat stem rust, the fungus affects wheat, barley and rye stems...

  • Celiac.com Sponsor:

  • Forum Discussions

    Hi, i heard about shampoos etc but didn't think much about it but will definitely look in to it, thanks.  My bloating has subsided slightly snd this is since i change my vitamins from Holland and barrett to some online which are free ...
    Could someone who is more familiar with numbers help me to interpret mine since the doctor did not? Got these results last week and was told to go gluten-free. No endoscopy or further testing needed because it is probable that I have celiac...
    Migraines are definitely associated with celiac. Many many factors contribute to migraines, which also occur with a celiac. Definitely seek help as your migraines diminish the quality of life. “Don’t worry,” is not an acceptable plan of care...
×
×
  • Create New...