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    Scott Adams

    Follow-Up to the Catassi Study - Scandinavia

    Scott Adams


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    Colin, et al, published a follow-up study to the Catassi (Ceeliac Disease in the Year 2000: Exploring the Iceberg - University of Ancona, Italy) in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology - 28(7):595-8, 1993, which demonstrated that approximately one third of the patients from the Catassi Study who had raised antibodies but no villous atrophy, did have villous atrophy when tested two years later. These results raise the amount of diagnosed celiacs from the Catassi, et al study to over 1 in 200.


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    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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