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  • Jefferson Adams

    Food Knowledge and Mental Stress Are Big Predictors of Gluten‐Free Diet Success

    Jefferson Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      A team of researchers recently set out to assess the factors that influence gluten‐free diet adherence in patients with celiac disease. They found that food knowledge and stress levels play major roles in gluten-free diet success. 


    Caption: Image: CC--Lefteris Heretakis

    Celiac.com 08/20/2018 - Following a gluten-free diet is critical for people with celiac disease. However, the factors that influence gluten-free diet success for people with celiac disease are not well understood on a population-wide scale.

    A team of researchers recently set out to assess the factors that influence gluten‐free diet adherence in patients with celiac disease. The research team included E. P. Halmos, M. Deng, S. R. Knowles, K. Sainsbury, B. Mullan, and J. A. Tye‐Din.



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    The team asked celiac patients to complete an online survey that included the validated Celiac Dietary Adherence Test, along with questions on demographics, details of diagnosis and management and assessment of diet knowledge, quality of life and psychological distress. The team then reviewed the survey data for predictors of adherence and quality of life.

    There were a total of 7,393 survey responses, with 5,310 people completing the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test, and 3,230 of whom were following a gluten‐free diet. 

    Multivariate regression showed that predictors of gluten-free dietary adherence included older age, being male, symptoms severity after gluten consumption, above average gluten-free food knowledge, and lower risk of psychological distress. People with celiac disease who followed a gluten-free diet also reported better quality of life. 

    Respondents who reported having poor food knowledge were more likely to wrongly identify gluten‐free foods, though they could still recognize gluten‐containing foods. This indicates that poor overall food knowledge may lead people with celiac disease to over‐restrict their diet. Poor understanding of gluten‐free diet and stressful psychological well-being were the main modifiable risk factors for failure to follow a gluten‐free diet in patients with celiac disease. 

    From these responses, the team concluded that access to a dietitian and mental health care professional, in cases of psychological stress, is likely necessary to improve gluten-free dietary observation, and thus to improve overall patient health and well-being.

    Read more at: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeuticsdoi.org/10.1111/apt.14791

     

    The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Gastroenterology, Central Clinical School, Monash University in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, the Cartovera Pty. Ltd. in Adelaide, SA, Australia, the Department of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology in Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Mental Health, St Vincent's Hospital in Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University in Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK, the Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine Research Group, School of Psychology, Curtin University in Bentley, WA, Australia, the Immunology Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, and the Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne in Parkville, Victoria, Australia.


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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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