Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams

    Food Manufacturers Slow to Defend Wheat

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 01/17/2014 - What's up with wheat producers and product manufacturers? Wheat sales are flat, gluten-free is through the roof, and the industry is mum.

    Photo: CC--jimmywayneThough under 1 percent of Americans suffer from celiac disease, nearly one in three people say they are eating gluten-free, according to NPD Group. Consumption of flour in the U.S. is at a 22-year low, says the U.S. Department of Agriculture.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    And rather than leaping to the defense of wheat, or loudly touting its benefits, companies including General Mills (GIS) and Kellogg (K) are creating pricier gluten-free versions of their products, while leaving industry groups to defend their regular fare. The U.S. market for gluten-free foods will climb from $4.2 billion in 2012 to $6.6 billion by 2017, according to researcher Packaged Facts.

    Overall sales of the seven Chex varieties without gluten are up by at least 10 percent in each of the past three fiscal years, while the $6 billion breakfast cereal category has remained flat.

    The combination of flat sales of traditional wheat-containing cereal products, and the dramatic rise in sales of gluten-free products has presented a challenge for manufacturers that make both products that contain gluten, and other products that are gluten-free.

    If they are too loud about touting the benefits of gluten-free products, they risk slippage on their wheat based products, and vice versa.

    When it comes to dealing with flash trends, says Mark Lang, a food marketing professor at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, the manufacturing industry typically has "nothing to gain, and you have everything to lose.”

    So, at the same time General Mills has been careful not to push wheat, it has also been careful not to align itself with any of the anti-gluten figures.

    When asked if General Mills has been slow to respond to the incursion of gluten into traditional wheat territory, company spokeswoman Kirstie Foster says that the company is responding as they think best.

    If you think about it, General Mills' strategy might not be too bad. If they can sell more gluten-free grains and products at premium prices, then the decline in wheat consumption might not have such a negative impact on their bottom line.

    Still, the lukewarm defense of wheat by grain producers comes as a surprises to Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma and other books on nutrition.
    “The industry has been flat-footed in their response,” he says. “They should be reminding people that gluten is protein, generally thought of as a healthy nutrient compared to fats or carbs.”

    Source: Businessweek 

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Paul Smith
    Celiac.com 12/14/2009 - Soy is a food allergen and there are several main issues. Firstly, soy proteins, especially the trypsin inhibitor enzymes, along with the proteins in dairy products, wheat, peanuts, eggs, sesame seeds, shellfish and crustaceans, have a tendency to produce allergic reactions in susceptible individuals. However, all my reading and experience of soy, over 50 years, suggests that soy protein is somewhat milder in its action than the proteins in peanuts, eggs and sesame seeds. From a toxicological point of view and as reported by FSANZ, the presence of soy at less than 88 p.p.m. (parts per million) does not register for the vast majority...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/11/2012 - Sometimes, it's the small, local stories that help to capture the larger picture. More and more, community food banks are making efforts to accommodate people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance by stocking gluten-free foods. However, many of those food banks are tight on funds and shelf space, so finding the right balance between the needs of the majority of their clients and the few who need gluten-free foods can be a challenge.
    Recently, the Pictou County Celiac Support Group in Pictou County, Nova Scotia sought to help tip that balance with a $500 donation to the local food bank. The donation will help to ensure that...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/02/2014 - Most people have heard about kidney stones, or gall stones, due to calcium build up. Others may know that calcium deposits can affect the heart, and even the brain. However, until now, it was not known that, in certain cases, celiac disease can trigger calcification in the brain.
    Doctors examining a 24-year-old Brazilian man with a history of recurrent headaches revealed a rare condition known as the CEC syndrome, a combination of celiac disease, epilepsy, and cerebral calcification, commonly referred to as ‘brain stones.’
    The man had been treated for migraine headaches over a period of 10 years, with little response. St...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/15/2015 - The steep costs of getting food onto the shelves at major grocery chains has claimed another notable start-up, the Charlotte-based gluten-free foods company, Bumbalooza.
    The quick, promising rise and rapid demise of Bumbalooza still troubles sisters-in-law Holly Paeper and Monique Prato. In just two short years, their Charlotte-based gluten-free foods company, Bumbalooza, rose to prominence in the specialty foods community, winning fans, customers and awards.
    Their promising start looked even rosier when, against stiff competition, the team won the Charlotte Chamber's Power Up Challenge, complete with a check for $25,000...