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  • Jefferson Adams

    Forget Gluten, Are ATIs the Real Culprit?

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      A type of wheat proteins called ATIs may cause inflammation to spread beyond the gut.


    Photo: CC--sleepyclaus
    Caption: Photo: CC--sleepyclaus

    Celiac.com 01/02/2017 - New research shows that a group of proteins in wheat, called ATIs, may be responsible for activating inflammation in such disorders as celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Scientists also believe that the proteins may promote the development of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The findings were presented at UEG Week 2016 in Vienna in Vienna, Austria, a meeting organized by United European Gastroenterology for specialists to communicate the latest research in digestive and liver diseases.



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    One group of proteins found in wheat - amylase-trypsin inhibitors (ATIs) - has been shown to trigger an immune response in the gut that can spread to other tissues in the body. ATIs are plant-derived proteins that inhibit enzymes of common parasites - such as mealworms and mealybugs - in wheat.

    Interestingly, ATIs also have an important role in metabolic processes that occur during seed development.

    The finding that ATIs may promote inflammation in the and beyond the gut, is a major step forward in understanding the mechanics of celiac disease and/or gluten-intolerance.

    Stay tuned for more news on this and other breaking stories in celiac disease research.

    Read more at MedicalNewsToday.com.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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