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    Are there any unique factors to be considered for children? (I've heard that the serology has a lower predictive value for children under age two, since IgA may be depressed, or with anyone who has a condition which depresses IgA.)**


    Scott Adams

    Vijay Kumar, M.D., Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics: Not really. It is not true that the serological methods have lower predictive value in children less than two years of age. In all the studies that we did, there was 100% correlation of the EMA to the disease activity irrespective of the age.


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    Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI & Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: There are age dependent changes in several blood parameters during childhood. It is well known that immunoglobulin levels depend on the age of children. E.g. the IgA class immunoglobulins reach the adult level only by 16 years of age, and the blood level of IgA immunoglobulins is only 1/5th of adult value below two years of age. A large study from Europe (Brgin-Wollf et al. Arch Dis Child 1991;66:941-947) showed that the endomysium antibody test is less specific and sensitive in children below two years of age. They found that the sensitivity of the EmA test decreased from 98% to 88% in children younger than 2 years of age. It means that 12% of their patients with celiac disease, who were younger than two years of age, did not have an increase in their endomysium antibody levels.

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    No. Celiac sprue is not a well-researched disease. Most of what we know about foods that are safe and foods that are not is gathered from anecdotal evidence provided by celiacs themselves. There is a great deal of controversy about what affects celiacs and what doesnt.
    Take, for example, buckwheat. Along with corn and rice, this is one of only three common grains left on the "safe" list for celiacs. However, some celiac societies have put it on the "unsafe" list and there is anecdotal evidence that some individuals react to it as they do to wheat. Yet a well-known specialist in grain research points out that buckwheat is more closely related to rhubarb than to the toxic grains, so if buckwheat is unsafe then any plant might be unsafe.
    In considering anecdotal evidence for whether a food is safe or not, individuals must make their own choices, but each of us should clearly understand that anecdotal evidence is gathered from individuals with widely varied experience.
    It could be that the "buckwheat flour" that a celiac reacted to was actually one of those mixes that combines buckwheat flour with wheat flour. Another possibility is that, since buckwheat and wheat are often grown in the same fields in alternating years, the "pure buckwheat flour" may have been contaminated from the start by wheat grains gathered at harvest. Yet another explanation might be that the buckwheat was milled in a run that was preceded by wheat or any of the other toxic grains, so the flour was contaminated at the mill. Finally, some individuals -- celiacs or not -- may have celiac-like reactions to buckwheat; they are allergic. Celiacs who are allergic to buckwheat may be easily fooled into believing they are having a gluten reaction. Or, it could be that some evolutionary trick has put a toxic peptide chain into buckwheat despite its distant relation to the other grains, but the odds against this happening are long.
    As individual celiacs learn to live gluten-free, they must gauge their own reactions to foods, do lots of research, ask questions, and try to understand the many variables that may affect the ingredients in their food.
    The following is a list of ingredients which some celiacs believe are harmful, others feel are safe:
    Alcohol Grain alcohol Grain vinegars White vinegar Vanilla extract and other flavorings (may contain alcohol) Amaranth Millet Buckwheat Quinoa Teff   Wheat starch is used in the some countries gluten-free diet because of the belief that it contains only a trace or no gluten and that good baked products cannot be made without it. In a laboratory, wheat starch purity can be easily controlled, but in most plants this is not always the case. Wheat starch is not considered safe for celiacs in these countries: United States, Canada, Italy.
    For more information on this topic visit our Safe & Forbidden Lists.

    Scott Adams
    Wine, rum, tequila, and sake are usually safe as their alcohols do not generally come from toxic grains. Some vodkas are also okay. However, as with any other ingested product, you should gauge your reaction and learn as much about your favored brands as possible.
    Grain alcohols are one of those controversial items, but recent ADA guidelines indicate that all 100% distilled spirits are safe, including Whiskey, bourbon and gin. Regular beers, must be avoided, since malt (usually from barley) is an ingredient. Even rice beers use malt, but there are a handful of gluten-free beers on the market today.

    Scott Adams
    Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI & Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: The biopsy is a small piece of tissue, such as from the inside lining of the intestine, that has been removed to look for diseases. The biopsy itself is not painful, because there are no pain-sensitive nerves inside the small intestine. An intestinal biopsy can be done in either of two ways depending on the age of the children and the tradition of the institution. Sometimes a blind biopsy procedure is performed by a biopsy capsule. This is thin flexible tube with a capsule at the tip, which has a hole and a tiny knife inside the capsule. This capsule is introduced into the intestine under fluoroscopy (X-ray) control. Alternatively, with an endoscopy the doctor can see inside the digestive tract without using an x-ray to obtain biopsies. The biopsy specimens are processed and viewed under the microscope to identify or exclude celiac disease. An important basic rule is that the biopsy should be performed safely. For a safe procedure children (and adults) should be sedated. There are two methods of sedation: unconscious (general anesthesia) and conscious sedation. During both kinds of sedation the vital parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation) of patients are continuously monitored. The method of choice depends on the child.
    Conscious sedation is performed with two different intravenous medications. One of them is a sedative medication (e.g. Versed), which causes amnesia in 80-90% of children, and even older children do not recall the procedure. The second medication is a pain-killer type medication (e.g. Fentanyl), which further reduces the discomfort associated with the procedure. In addition, the throat is sprayed with a local anesthetic in older children, which makes the throat numb and prevents retching at the introduction of the endoscope.
    During general anesthesia the anesthesiologist uses sleep-gases (e.g. halothan) and intravenous medications and then places a tube into the trachea. Children are completely unconscious. This is a safer way to perform endoscopy, because the patients are fully relaxed and their airway is protected. However, the anesthesia itself has certain complications.

    Scott Adams
    There are two classes of antibodies seen in untreated celiac disease. Antibodies directed against a fragment of gluten called gliadin, and antibodies directed against a particular tissue in the body itself. The two main areas in the body which can be attacked by its own antibodies are the aendomysial (the covering of muscle), and the reticulin ( the framework for kidney and liver), but there are others.
    To conduct the test, 5ccs of blood is drawn from the patient, and the blood cells are removed. The gliadin test is usually an automated machine-read test, which means there is little room for interpretor error. However, currently in the USA there is no standard methods for conducting the test, or normal ranges for the results. The endomysial tests are more dependent on the experience and ability of a pathologist who looks at a pattern of staining produced by the patients serum on a slice of monkey esophagus. While this test is done in similar way in most labs, there are many differences in how the results are interpreted.
    How good are these tests?
    If all of the blood test results are positive a celiac disease diagnosis is 90% accurate. However, there are several circumstances in which the tests can be inaccurate. IGA and IGG are two different varieties of antibodies which are produced by most peoples immune systems. There is a different blood test for each of the antibodies. Of the two tests, the IGA gliadin and IGA endomysial tests are the most accurate. However, this test can become negative relatively quickly after going on a gluten-free diet (3-6 months), which can cause a false negative test result. The IGG is less specific, and can sometimes be positive in non-celiacs. Also, about 4% of celiacs have no IgA at all! For these reasons it is very important that both tests are done for an accurate diagnosis. The biopsy is still considered the "standard candle" to confirm a blood diagnosis, and give a 100% sure diagnosis.
    For all tests for celiac disease it is necessary that one is on a gluten-containing diet, or false-negative test results could be given. Blood tests may also be useful in following up a known celiac and confirm that the diet is indeed free of large amounts of gluten. Also, because of the lack of standardization, keep in mind that blood test results may not be directly comparable from one lab to the next.

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    Jefferson Adams
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    Jefferson Adams
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    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
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    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
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    3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions:
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