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    Scott Adams

    Future Enzyme Treatment Possible for People with Celiac Disease

    Scott Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2004 May 13
    Piper JL, Gray GM, Khosla C. Stanford University.

    Celiac.com 11/28/2004 - A study by researchers at Stanford University looked at the ability of Prolyl endopeptidase (PEP)--a specific type of enzyme--to break down gliadin peptides in a living organism--rats. In an effort to determine whether a resistance to the break down of proteins by proteases enzymes is the cause of toxicity of the Pro- and Gln-rich peptides, the scientists analyzed the digestive resistance of a panel of alpha and gamma-gliadin peptides that are believed to induce gluten toxicity--all of which happen to be very resistant to gastric and pancreatic protease digestion--but can be broken down by intestinal brush border peptidases. The researchers determined that supplementation of PEP substantially reduced the concentrations of these peptides, and they determined a pharmacologically useful PEP dosage. According to the researchers: "This data verifies and extends our earlier proposal that gliadin peptides, while resistant to proteolysis, can be processed efficiently by PEP supplementation. Indeed, PEP may be able to treat Celiac Sprue by reducing or eliminating such peptides from the intestine."

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    I've been taking a special formula of these enzymes designed for gluten and caisein digestion, I found it at the grocery store by accident.

    I started taking them and I have noticed a significant decrease in painful attacks if I accidentally get something with wheat in it.

    I've only been taking it for a few weeks and only sporadically mostly if I go out to eat just in case, it is leading me think there is hope and I won't be condemned to only eating from my kitchen for the rest of my life.

    This morning my husband made pancakes and I took them before eating and I wasn't keeled over in pain it may be a miracle!?

    I will be looking for more research on this.

    thank you

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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