Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Gene Carries Increased Risk of Refractory Celiac Disease

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 01/03/2008 - It’s pretty well documented that HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 sereotypes are closely associated with celiac disease. Patients who test positive for both sereotypes are at much greater risk for developing celiac disease. Celiac disease is closely associated with the presence of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, and has also been tied to variations in the MY09B gene on the 19th chromosome.

    Homozygosity is the condition of having two identical genes, of many possible combinations, on a single chromosome site.  

    HLA-DQ2 homozygosity means that a person has inherited the HLA-DQ2 gene from both parents.

    In addition to having a much higher risk of developing celiac disease in general, people with HLA-DQ2 homozygosity have a much higher risk of developing refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Refractory celiac disease is a rare type of celiac disease in which a gluten-free diet fails to eliminate symptoms and to reverse celiac-associated damage. Eneteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is a type of cancer that often develops in people with advanced intestinal damage such as commonly found in celiac patients.

    A team of Dutch doctors recently set out to determine if the presence of the MY09B gene carries an elevated risk of refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

    The research team evaluated 62 people who were confirmed to have both refractory celiac disease type II and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. They also evaluated 421 people with simple celiac disease, along with a control group of 1624 people without celiac disease.

    The team conducted genotyping of MY09B along with molecular HLA-DQ2 typing on all of the patients.

    The tests showed that one nucleotide variation in MY09B was substantially different in the refractory celiac group than in either the simple celiac or the control group.

    The allele in question is known as the rs7259292 T allele, and the results of the tests showed that it occurs far more frequently in patients with refractory celiac and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma than in either the control group or the group with simple celiac disease. In fact, the halpotype that carries the rs7253292 T allele occurs in 11% of the patients with refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma compared with just 2% of the control group and 3% or patients with regular celiac disease.

    Additionally, the results showed that patients who carry the MY09B rs7259292 allele or who showed HLA-DQ2 homozygosity faced similarly high risk levels for refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma compared to patients with simple celiac disease.

    The results did not show any connection or interaction between the MY09B rs7259292 allele and HLA-DQ homozygosity.

    Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology; 2007: 5(12): 1399-1405


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Very informative. My 11 year old grand daughter was diagnosed with refractory celiac disease. She has the HLADQ2 gene. I do research every day and I always end up coming back to your site for accurate up to date information. Thank you.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

×
×
  • Create New...