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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    General Mills Pulls Plug on Gluten-free Chex Oatmeal

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 09/02/2015 - Cereal maker General Mills is pulling the plug on its Gluten Free Chex Oatmeal.

    Image: Wikimedia Commons--General Mills, Inc.A spokesperson for General Mills confirmed that the product has been discontinued due to low sales. The company says it will make its final shipments of the gluten-free oatmeal in October.

    This constitutes an ignoble end for a brand that made its official debut last year.

    Chex Gluten Free Oatmeal was available in original, apple cinnamon and maple brown sugar flavors, and made without artificial flavors, colors, preservatives or high fructose corn syrup.

    The decision to discontinue Gluten Free Chex Oatmeal comes amid controversy regarding General Mills methods of sorting oats for its new gluten-free Cheerios.

    What do you think? Are you sad? Or are there too many good gluten-free choices to worry? Share your thoughts below.


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    I'm sorry to hear that the Chex oatmeal will be discontinued. I will be going out to all the stores to stock up, if I can still find any. The one thing people don't check is their milk. I recently found out that my local store brand milk is not gluten-free. When first diagnosed they published a list of all their products that were gluten-free. Now in 2015 they are changing that list and only 5 store brand items are gluten-free. I couldn't understand why my tests were coming back positive when I check labels and call manufacturers. So be sure to check the slightest thing you consume as that may be the gluten end product not the one saying gluten-free and blaming it.

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    We are a family of 4; 3 of which are biopsy confirmed celiacs. My husband passed his genes to both kids.

    That said, my home is 100% gluten free.

    My family has absolutely no issues with plain old Quaker oats.

    We consume it often enough that it would show up on tests if it caused issues. All 3 of their annual tests are repeatedly undetectable for gluten antibody. We test every year to primarily check kids' compliance with friends & social events. That said, we trust Quaker, and won't spent the extra $$ just because it's labeled gluten free.

    This is true but not all celiacs can handle regular oatmeal which may be contaminated from wheat, barley and or rye. A couple of dollars is worth the extra precaution. We should always check out the labels for the healthiest choices. I will be sad to see it go but there are other choices out there so it's not the worst so long as they keep the new gluten-free Cheerios. I was so glad to get Cheerios again. Thank you.

     

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    I have not tried the cereal but if it has a lot of sugar I don't want to. I will also ditto all the other comments about stores not putting the gluten-free foods in one place. I don't have time to peruse the whole cereal isle in case they have a new new gluten-free product or the whole past section for some new pasta. I often do look through the gluten-free section for a new addition.

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    General Mills used molasses as a sweetener. I have to be gluten-free, dairy-free, and molasses was listed on the dairy-free dietitian handout given to me at the hospital clinic...due I guess to a similar sugar. Hard to find further info, but? I stopped buying Chex gluten-free because of this.

    Molasses is gluten and dairy-free.

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    It made me sick. I have verified celiac and couldn't eat this product. Good thing it was pulled from the market. I don't believe it is coincidence that it was pulled right as companies are having to prove advertised gluten-free products are actually gluten free.

    Actually the labeling laws surrounding the use of "gluten-free" have been in effect for years now, so I doubt that is the reason.

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    I have not tried the cereal but if it has a lot of sugar I don't want to. I will also ditto all the other comments about stores not putting the gluten-free foods in one place. I don't have time to peruse the whole cereal isle in case they have a new new gluten-free product or the whole past section for some new pasta. I often do look through the gluten-free section for a new addition.

    There is no sugar in the plain oats product other than what would be naturally occurring in the oats themselves.

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    I'm sorry to hear that the Chex oatmeal will be discontinued. I will be going out to all the stores to stock up, if I can still find any. The one thing people don't check is their milk. I recently found out that my local store brand milk is not gluten-free. When first diagnosed they published a list of all their products that were gluten-free. Now in 2015 they are changing that list and only 5 store brand items are gluten-free. I couldn't understand why my tests were coming back positive when I check labels and call manufacturers. So be sure to check the slightest thing you consume as that may be the gluten end product not the one saying gluten-free and blaming it.

    Judie, I am curious what store brand milk contains gluten? I've never experienced a problem with milk, yogurt yes...

    As far as the gluten-free Chex Oatmeal I'm sad to see it go, came in handy for a quick breakfast or lunch. I'll be buying as much as I can before its removed entirely.

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    Don't trust General Mills. Had bad reactions, twice [a year apart] to gluten-free Chex when it first came out a few years ago. Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me. Anything General Mills produces in the gluten-free world is suspect - - and their factory-side "cleaning" of oats is unreliably inconsistent [ see Sept 1st gluten-free Watchdog report: https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/news/gluten-free-cheerios-updated-position-statement/ ]. Bottom line, any amount of gluten above 0 ppm really ain't "gluten-free" -- stop kidding yourself! To those sensitive folk, like me, with DH, we know . . . And we suffer the consequences. General Mills is just trying to profiteer (and not lose market share) from a growing "fad" (as their marketing department perceives it) -- but without any real care, consideration, or understanding of what it takes to safely feed true celiacs.

    Well put Doug! I've been commenting on articles for years about how I cannot tolerate the most minute amount of gluten. My GI doctor says that I'm the lucky one because I know the damage is being done immediately. I don't feel so lucky when I get contaminated or glutened. I'm very cautious of what I ingest, shampoo, etc. I think the article says they don't add preservatives, although I've never seen the oats (I can't eat them, nor millet, nor buckwheat) the regular chex cereal does have a preservative added. I could never trust a company that produces so many gluten containing products. I not only get the GI issues, I have DH, celiac neuropathy, and a handful of autoimmune disorders thanks in part to it taking doctors over 40 years to figure out why I was so sick and only 80#!

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    This is very sad. I enjoyed the Chex oatmeal a LOT. However, I agree with many of the previous comments that General Mills did not pay grocery stores enough to advertise the product or place the product in key points in stores. I really had to look for it a few times, and found it in very odd places. The oatmeal was not advertised nearly as much as the gluten free cereals, either. These faux pas are just a couple of business mistakes General Mills made when bringing this gluten free oatmeal to market.

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    It just seems that every "good" gluten-free product is canned due to low sales. Well if the product was advertised as much as the non gluten-free it might sell better. My husband loves oatmeal so when the gluten-free came out he was so happy as he truly had missed it. Shame.

    I must agree. I just found this product in a city 1 hour and 10 minutes away. Never saw it in my town that only has 3 grocery stores. Really loved it.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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