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    GluteGuard Carica Papaya Fruit Enzymes by Glutagen - A Product Review

    Celiac.com Sponsor: Review
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      I would recommend GluteGuard to anyone who wishes to improve their digestion, as it definitely improved mine, regardless of whether or not I was ever cross-contaminated during my trial of the product.


    Celiac.com 10/12/2018 - Ever since I read the study about how caricain enzymes can break down specific gliadin peptides in celiacs on a gluten challenge, I've been hoping for a chance to try out Glutagen's GluteGuard enzymes. The tablets contain Caricain, which is an enzyme that is found in the skin of an unripe papaya fruit. According to the company, GluteGuard can help people manage their gluten-free diet better by supporting "gluten digestion" whenever they may encounter cross-contamination.

    • Celiac.com's standard disclaimer about enzymes: If you have celiac disease AVOID ALL GLUTEN, and do not misuse these in a way that would cause you to knowingly eat gluten, or be less vigilant about your gluten-free diet.
    • Glutagen advises that the supplement is not a treatment or cure for celiac disease, and it is essential that people with celiac disease maintain a strict gluten free diet.

    My GluteGuard Trial
    As soon as my sample bottle arrived I began taking them as per the directions on the bottle: One GluteGuard tablet before each meal, and I did this before every meal over a two week period. My goal was to see if I noticed any difference while taking them, in comparison to how I felt before.



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    The first thing I noticed was that my digestion was suddenly kicked into overdrive, which means I had firmer stools, and shorter times in the bathroom. I was surprised to find my digestion improve so much, even when I knew that my diet was not in any way contaminated by gluten (at least as far as I know!), which was an added bonus.

    Eating Out
    I normally eat out 1-2 times per week, and I like to believe that I am very careful whenever I do this. However, a recent study has shown that 9 out 10 people are exposed to gluten when attempting to eat gluten-free in a restaurant. I would not call myself a "super sensitive celiac," but I did not notice any difference between eating out vs. eating at home, and more importantly, I had no issues after eating out five times during my trial period.

    Overall Impression
    I would recommend GluteGuard to anyone who wishes to improve their digestion, as it definitely improved mine, regardless of whether or not I was ever cross-contaminated during my trial of the product. For those on a gluten-free diet who do continue to eat out, or those who must do so when they travel, definitely consider this product as it may help prevent the very negative effects of cross-contamination.

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