Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams

    Gluten Ataxia Patients with Low Titre Antigliadin Antibodies Benefit from Gluten-Free Diet

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Gluten ataxia patients without enteropathy have lower levels of antigliadin antibodies (AGA) compared to patients with celiac disease. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy shows that those patients see brain improvement with a strict gluten-free diet.


    Image: CC--purplesteph
    Caption: Image: CC--purplesteph

    Celiac.com 11/28/2018 - Patients with gluten ataxia without enteropathy have lower levels of antigliadin antibodies (AGA) compared to patients with celiac disease. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NAA/Cr area ratio) of the cerebellum improves in patients with gluten ataxia following a strict gluten-free diet, and is associated with an improvement in symptoms. 

    A team of researchers recently set out to present their experience of the effect of a gluten-free diet in patients with ataxia and low levels of AGA antibodies measured by a commercial assay. The research team included Marios Hadjivassiliou, Richard A Grünewald, David S Sanders, Panagiotis Zis, Iain Croall, Priya D Shanmugarajah, Ptolemaios G Sarrigiannis, Nick Trott, Graeme Wild, and Nigel Hoggard. They are variously affiliated with the Academic Departments of Neurosciences and Neuroradiology; the Departments of Gastroenterology, the Departments of Dietetics; the Departments of Immunology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, in Sheffield, UK.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    The team conducted MR spectroscopy on 21 consecutive patients with ataxia and serum AGA levels below the positive cut-off for celiac disease, but above a re-defined cut-off in the context of gluten ataxia, at baseline and after a gluten-free diet.  Of the 21 included patients with gluten ataxia, the team found that ten were on a strict gluten-free diet with elimination of AGA, 5 were on a gluten-free diet, but continued to have AGA, while 6 patients did not follow a gluten-free diet. 

    The NAA/Cr area ratio from the cerebellar vermis increased in all patients on a strict gluten-free diet, increased in only 1 out of 5  patients on a gluten-free diet with persisting circulating AGA, and decreased in all patients who did not follow a gluten-free diet. 

    From these results, the team concludes that patients with ataxia and low levels of AGA benefit from a strict gluten-free diet. The results suggest an urgent need to redefine the serological cut-off for circulating AGA in the diagnosis of gluten ataxia.

    Read more in Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1444; doi:10.3390/nu10101444

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/09/2013 - Previous studies have shown an immunologic response primarily directed against transglutaminase (TG)6 in patients with gluten ataxia (GA). A team of researchers set out to see if Transglutaminase 6 antibodies could be helpful in the diagnosis of gluten ataxia.
    The team included M. Hadjivassiliou, P. Aeschlimann, D.S. Sanders, M. Mäki, K. Kaukinen, R.A. Grünewald, O. Bandmann, N. Woodroofe, G. Haddock, and D.P. Aeschlimann.
    They are variously affiliated with the Departments of Neurology (M.H., R.A.G., O.B.) and Gastroenterology (D.S.S.) at Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield, UK, the Matrix Biology & Tissue R...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/27/2014 - There have been a few reports tying cortical myoclonus with ataxia to celiac disease. Such reports also suggest that the former is unresponsive to a gluten-free diet.
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine if there is any significant connection between the two conditions. The research team included Ptolemaios G. Sarrigiannis, Nigel Hoggard, Daniel Aeschlimann, David S. Sanders, Richard A. Grünewald, Zoe C. Unwin, and Marios Hadjivassiliou.
    They are variously associated with the Departments of Gastroenterology, Neurology, Neurophysiology and Neuroradiology at Royal Hallamshire Hospital, in Sheffield, ...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/16/2017 - Cerebellar ataxias can be caused by a wide range of disease processes, either genetic or acquired. Establishing a clear diagnosis requires a methodical approach with expert clinical evaluation and investigation.
    A team of researchers recently published a description of the causes of ataxia in 1500 patients with cerebellar ataxia.  The research team included M Hadjivassiliou, J Martindale, P Shanmugarajah, R A Grünewald, P G Sarrigiannis, N Beauchamp, K Garrard, R Warburton, D S Sanders, D Friend, S Duty, J Taylor, and N Hoggard.
    They are variously affiliated with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Royal Hallamshire H...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/10/2017 - Gluten ataxia is defined as sporadic ataxia with positive antigliadin antibodies without an alternative cause. Gluten ataxia patients often receive MRS at baseline and again after a period on a gluten-free diet.
    A research team recently set out to evaluate the effect of gluten free diet on magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the cerebellum in patients with gluten ataxia.
    The research team included M Hadjivassiliou, RA Grünewald, DS Sanders, P Shanmugarajah, N Hoggard. They are with the Academic Departments of Neurosciences (M.H., R.A.G., P.S.), Gastroenterology (D.S.S.), and Neuroradiology (N.H.), Sheffield Teaching ...