Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    Gluten Definitely Triggers Symptoms in Some NCGS Patients

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Gluten triggers symptoms in some types of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Photo: CC--Joe Dyer
    Caption: Gluten triggers symptoms in some types of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Photo: CC--Joe Dyer

    Celiac.com 08/09/2016 - Some researchers have suggested that gluten may not be the actual trigger of symptoms in non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Others feel that gluten is definitely the trigger, especially in certain cases.

    A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate patients with clinical non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), who presented with lymphocytic enteritis, positive celiac genetics and negative celiac blood tests. The team felt that the results would confirm that gluten is, in fact, the trigger of symptoms in this subgroup of patients.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):




    The research team included M Rosinach, F Fernández-Bañares, A Carrasco, M Ibarra, R Temiño, A Salas, and M Esteve. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Universitari Mutua Terrassa, Terrassa, Barcelona, Spain, the Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd), Madrid, Spain, and with the Department of Pathology, Hospital Universitari Mutua Terrassa, Terrassa in Barcelona, Spain.

    The team conducted a double-blind randomized clinical trial of gluten vs placebo re-challenge on 18 patients over 18 years of age, HLA-DQ2/8+, negative celiac serology and gluten-dependent lymphocytic enteritis, and GI symptoms, with clinical and histological remission at inclusion.

    Eleven of the patients received 20 grams per day of gluten, while the seven others received a non-gluten placebo. The team measured clinical symptoms, quality of life (GIQLI), and presence of gamma/delta+ cells and transglutaminase deposits.

    The results showed that 91% of patients had clinical relapse during gluten challenge compared with just 28.5% after placebo (p = 0.01). Clinical scores and GIQLI worsened after gluten, but not after placebo (p<0.01).

    This study shows that gluten is definitely the trigger for symptoms in a subgroup of patients with clinical NCGS. After a gluten-free diet patients experienced positive celiac genetics, lymphocytic enteritis, and clinical and histological remission.

    Source:

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17):




  • Related Articles

    Gryphon Myers
    Celiac.com 09/03/2012 - Celiac disease numbers in Western countries are currently somewhere in the 1:100 range, but this does not account for a host of non-celiac gluten intolerant people. For many, it is common knowledge that gluten and wheat intolerance manifests in a variety of forms, and not all of them are diagnosable as celiac disease. This has not prevented scientific circles from debating the existence of such non-celiac wheat sensitivities though. A double-blind placebo-controlled study spanning 2001-2011 demonstrates that wheat sensitivity exists as a distinct clinical condition, separate from celiac disease.
    Many who go to their doctors ...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/14/2013 - Until now, rates of non-celiac gluten sensitivity were largely a matter of clinical speculation, basically, educated guesswork among doctors.
    Some thought that rates of non-celiac gluten-sensitivity might by much higher than rates of celiac disease in the USA. But there was just no actual clinical data supporting these claims.
    A team of researchers recently set out to get some good clinical data that would tell them how common non-celiac gluten sensitivity actually is.
    The research team included Daniel V. DiGiacomo, Christina A. Tennyson, Peter H. Green, and Ryan T. Demmer. They are variously affiliated with...

    Jefferson Adams
    Non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) is a newly described clinical condition marked by symptoms which may affect the gastrointestinal tract, the nervous system, the skin, and other organs.
    There is little data regarding the origins of NCWS, and it is likely that numerous factors influence the various clinical manifestations of the condition.
    The one common thread in NCWS is wheat consumption. Symptoms disappear when wheat is eliminated from the diet, and reappear when wheat is consumed.
    Looking into the possibility that their NCWS patients might in fact be suffering from non-immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated wheat allergy, a team of researchers...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/13/2016 - Researchers Umberto Volta, Giacomo Caio, and Roberto De Giorgio, of the Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences at the University of Bologna in Bologna, Italy, recently submitted a letter to the medical journal Gastroenterology.
    In their letter, the researchers respond to a recent paper, published by Carroccio et al, reporting on the prevalence of autoimmunity (as identified by positivity of antinuclear antibodies [ANA] and associated autoimmune disorders) in non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) compared with celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). They note that the study results, based on retrospective and prospective...