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  • Destiny Stone
    Destiny Stone

    A Gluten-Free 4th of July

    Caption: Gluten-free Fourth of July (photo courtesy of Bob Jagendorf)

    Celiac.com 06/11/2010 - Most American parades and festivals revolve around good old fashioned American food. Most people will be enjoying  corn-dogs, french fries, waffle-cone sundaes and funnel cakes. Fourth of July celebrations are not likely to be very different from other festivals, and as a gluten-free person, it is important to be prepared for some good old fashioned American junk food-gluten-free.

    Converting your favorite junk foods to gluten-free may take a bit of creativity, but don't despair, it is possible. There are places offering gluten-free junk food options, but making your own gluten-free junk food is fun and takes the worry out of cross-contamination. The following recipes and suggestions are some American favorites but gluten-free.

    Gluten-Free Funnel CakeFunnel cakes are originally associated with the Pennsylvania Dutch part of the United States. Funnel cakes are often found at festivals, and popular events. Being gluten-free shouldn't mean the end of enjoying a popular American specialty dessert like funnel cakes, it simply means trying new gluten-free recipes that stand up to the traditional wheat flour cake. The following gluten-free funnel cake recipe is easy and only takes about 30 minutes to prepare. Make your cakes before the big event and take some to share, people won't believe they are gluten-free.

    Gluten-Free French Fries

    Don't let the name fool you. French fries are about as All-American as you get and crispy seasoned fries are even better. Try the following recipe for a yummy gluten-free seasoned french fry recipe.

    Ingredients

    • 2 1/2 pounds russet potatoes, peeled
    • 1 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour 
    • 1 teaspoon gluten-free garlic salt 
    • 1 teaspoon gluten-free onion salt 
    • ¾  teaspoon  Himalayan salt 
    • 1 teaspoon gluten-free paprika 
    • ½ to 1 cup water (add as needed)
    • 1 cup vegetable or olive oil for frying
    Directions
    1. Slice potatoes into French fries size. If you prefer thicker french fries, cut your fries in larger pieces, and place into cold water so they won't turn brown while you prepare the oil.
    2. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. While the oil is heating, sift the flour, garlic salt, onion salt, Himalayan salt, and paprika into a large bowl. Gradually stir in enough water so that the mixture can be drizzled from a spoon.
    3. Dip potato slices into the batter one at a time, and place in the hot oil so they are not touching at first. The fries must be placed into the skillet one at a time, or they will clump together. Fry until golden brown and crispy. Remove and drain on paper towels.

    Gluten-Free Waffle ConeGluten-Free Waffle Cones

    Waffle cones are easy to make gluten-free. Ingredients will need to be gluten-free, but there are so many yummy gluten-free options these days when it comes to sweets. Make sure to buy gluten-free waffle cones and gluten-free chocolate sauce and gluten-free whipped cream (homemade is the best) and also gluten-free toppings. Put it all together with your favorite fruit and you have a waffle-cone sundae fit for a celebrity.

    Have a safe and fun Fourth of July!



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  • About Me

    I diagnosed myself for gluten intolerance after a lifetime of bizarre, seemingly unrelated afflictions. If my doctors had their way, I would have already undergone neck surgery, still be on 3 different inhalers for asthma, be vomiting daily and having chronic panic attacks. However, since eliminating gluten from my diet in May 2009, I no longer suffer from any of those things. Even with the proof in the pudding (or gluten) my doctors now want me to ingest gluten to test for celiac-no can do.

  • Related Articles

    Jules Shepard
    This recipe calls for my Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour™.  You can find the recipe for this flour in mycookbook, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating or in various media links on my website, or you can also this truly all purpose flourready-made at my site. It produces amazing results in all your gluten-free baking.

    Sweet Potato Bundt Cake

    The leaves are nearly gone, but sweet potatoes and pumpkins are still calling to me from my kitchen!  I decided to experiment with sweet potato cake – something I haven’t tried yet (I love challenges!). This one is light, mild and oh so yummy! I offer two possible glazes, but it’s nice on its own too. Enjoy!

    Ingredients:
    2 ¼ cup Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour™
    1 tablespoon gluten-free baking powder
    ½ teaspoon guar gum (optional)
    1 cup granulated sugar
    ¼ cup brown sugar
    1 package gluten-free vanilla instant pudding dry mix (3.4 oz)
    Dash of salt
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon nutmeg
    1 teaspoon cardamom (or 2 ½ teaspoons pumpkin pie spice in lieu of the 3 separate spices)
    2 teaspoons gluten-free vanilla extract
    ¼ cup vanilla yogurt (soy or dairy)
    4 eggs or egg replacer equivalent
    ½ softened butter or Earth Balance Buttery Sticks (vegan alternative)
    2 tablespoons ground flax seeds or flax seed meal
    ¼ cup boiling water
    1 large cooked, peeled and mashed sweet potato (approx. 1 cup)
    Directions:
    Preheat oven to 325 F static or convection setting.

    Boil ¼ cup of water and add flax seed meal. Stir and set aside. Cook, peel and mash the sweet potato and set aside.

    In a large mixing bowl, stir the eggs or egg replacer until well mixed. To the eggs, add all dry ingredients, yogurt, vanilla and softened butter or Buttery Sticks. Mix well then stir in the slightly cooled flax seed meal and the mashed sweet potato last.

    Butter or oil a bundt pan and dust with Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour™ or corn starch. Pour the well-mixed batter into the pan and smooth out the top with a rubber spatula. Bake in preheated static oven for approximately 50 minutes or convection oven for approximately 35 minutes. The cake is done when a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Let the cake sit in the pan until slightly cooled, then invert onto a serving plate.

    Glazes:

    Lemon Glaze:
    1 cup sifted powdered sugar
    1 teaspoon finely shredded lemon peel
    3 teaspoons milk
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
    Mix all the ingredients together until smooth. Drizzle over top of the cake.

    Honey-Orange Glaze:
    ½ cup honey
    1 teaspoon finely shredded orange peel
    ½ cup orange juice (with or without pulp)
    Combine ingredients in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Stir until boiling and remove from heat. Let sit until slightly cooled, then drizzle over the cake.

    The finished Sweet Potato Bundt Cake (Gluten-Free)



    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/01/2010 - American Key Food Products (AKFP) has announced a patent application for the production process for a gluten-free cassava flour. The company also announced that it has begun initial production of this new gluten-free flour at its manufacturing facility in Brazil.
    Gluten is the protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten provides the structural elasticity in kneaded dough products, permits leavening, and supports the crumb structure and chewy texture of traditional baked goods.
    In the last few years, a number of manufacturers have produced gluten-free flour and starch products for gluten-free baking. However, creating baked goods without gluten is challenging, and the resulting baked goods can often be dry, crumbly, or gummy products.
    Cassava, or tapioca flour, has been one of the more promising ingredients for gluten-free baking. However, most traditional cassava flours have a coarse texture, similar to corn meal.
    According to AKFP technical sales director Carter Foss,  the company has spent more than a year developing the flour to have baking characteristics that closely mimic wheat flour in structure, texture and taste.
    The result of the AKFP process, which uses the complete root, is a fine, soft flour that contains both protein and fiber. The patent application covers various aspects of the manufacturing process, including particular milling and drying procedures, as well as the resulting flour itself.
    “During the processing of it, we have to get the physical characteristics made correctly or the flour fails. It over-bakes and turns to dust,” Foss said.
    Foss says that AKFP cassava flour can replace combinations of flours, starches and hydrocolloids in gluten-free baked goods, allowing for a simpler ingredient statement.
    After the pilot runs are completed at its new Brazilian facility, AKFP intends to have continuous production on line by the beginning of 2011.
    Source:

    http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Financial-Industry/AKFP-applies-for-patent-for-gluten-free-cassava-flour

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/11/2011 - St. Patrick's Day is once again upon us, which means it's a good time to prepare for a successful gluten-free celebration of the wearing of the green.
    One good thing for people on a gluten-free diet is that most traditional corned beef and cabbage recipes are gluten free. So, of course, are carrots and potatoes.
    If you plan of making corned beef, you should know that most commercial corned beef is gluten free. Some brands that are specifically labeled 'gluten free,' or which the makers' websites claim to be gluten-free, include:

    Brookfield Farms Colorado Premium - all corned beef products Cook's Freirich - all corned beef Giant Eagle Grobbel's Gourmet corned beef briskets Hormel Libby's Canned Meats (Corned Beef and Corned Beef Hash) Market Day: Corned Beef Brisket Mosey's corned beef Nathan's corned beef Safeway, Butchers cut bulk-wrapped corned beef brisket, corn beef brisket, vac-packed cooked corn beef Thuman’s cooked corn beef brisket, first cut corned beef (cooked and raw), top round corned beef (cooked), cap and capless corned beef Wegmans corned beef brisket. Many other brands not listed are also gluten free. Be sure to read the ingredients on the package, including those for any extra seasonings. Some labels may list natural flavorings, which rarely contain gluten. Still, if you're not sure, try to check the manufacturer's website, or maybe look for another brand.
    Gluten-Free Corned Beef Recipe
    Ingredients:
    6 pounds corned brisket of beef
    6 peppercorns, or gluten-free packaged pickling spices
    3 carrots, peeled and quartered
    3 onions, peeled and quartered
    1 medium-sized green cabbage, quartered or cut in wedges
    Melted butter (about 4 tablespoons)Directions:
    Place the corned beef in water to cover with the peppercorns or mixed pickling spices (in supermarkets, these often come packaged with the corned beef). Cover the pot or kettle, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 5 hours or until tender, skimming occasionally. During the last hour, add the carrots and onions and cover again. During the last 15 minutes, add the cabbage. Transfer meat and vegetables to a platter and brush the vegetables with the melted butter.
    Serve with boiled parsley potatoes, cooked separately. (The stock can be saved to add to a pot roast or stew instead of other liquid.)
    Serves 6, with meat left over for additional meals.
    **
    For those who love Irish soda bread, the following soda bread recipe is a modified version of the Irish Soda Bread recipe from Easy Gluten-Free Baking by Elizabeth Barbone (2009 Lake Isle Press). This version skips caraway seeds, because I hate them. However, if you are so inclined, you can add a tablespoon with the last dry ingredients before baking.

    Amazing Gluten-free Irish Soda Bread
    Ingredients:
    Vegetable shortening for pan
    White Rice Flour for pan
    3 1/2 cups white rice flour
    1/2 cup sweet rice flour
    1/4 cup cornstarch
    1/4 cup potato starch (not potato flour)
    5 teaspoons baking powder (Gluten Free)
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum
    1 1/2 cups currants
    1 cup (2 sticks) butter softened
    2 large eggs
    1 cup granulated sugar
    2 cups buttermilkDirections:
    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and Grease and rice flour a 9 inch springform pan.
    2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients
    3. In a large bowl, cream together butter, eggs, and sugar until light and fluffy, about 1 minute.
    Use high speed on a handheld mixer or medium-high on a stand mixer. Stir in half of the dry ingredients. Use low speed on a handheld mixer or stand mixer for this. Stir in buttermilk until thoroughly combined. Add remaining dry ingredients and caraway seeds (if desired) and raisins.
    4. Pour batter into prepared pan and spread evenly. Bake about 1 1/2 hours or until a tester inserted in center comes out clean.
    5. Place pan on a wire rack to cool. About 5 minutes. Remove Bread from pan and allow to cool completely on rack. Makes 1 loaf.


    Connie Sarros
    This article originally appeared in the Winter 2003 edition of Celiac.com's JournalofGluten-Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 01/27/2012 - Wheat is the most popular grain in the United States and is found in a multitude of products.  We are taught from young that milk helps our bones grow strong.  So what do people do who cannot safely consume these products?  They eat very well!
    “No Gluten” means avoiding all wheat, rye, barley, malt, kamut, spelt, triticale, graham flour, and contaminated oats.  But that won’t stop anyone who loves chocolate chip cookies from finding an alternative way to make them!  On a gluten-free diet, combinations of substitute flours are used (see Table 1).
    Once you have the magic combination of gluten-free flours, add a little more flavoring, a little more leavening, and voila!  You have wonderful chocolate chip cookies!
    But how do you make those cookies if you are also allergic to dairy products?  Do not despair.  There are viable alternatives to all ingredients.  Allergies to dairy products may be a reaction to the lactose in dairy products (the natural sugar in milk), to casein (milk protein), or to both.
    Lactose is often used in breads, cakes, cereals, cooking mixes, prepared meats and fish, and in soups.  Tuna fish often contains sulfites and has lactose in the broth.  It is even found in some medications.  Read labels constantly for hidden lactose.  Some lactose-sensitive people may tolerate un-pasteurized yogurt because yogurt cultures produce the enzyme lactase, which breaks down lactose into a simpler, more readily-digestible form.  This also applies to buttermilk and some cheeses.
    Casein is the protein found in milk.  Fortunately, cow’s milk is one of the easier ingredients to substitute in cooking; use equal amounts of soy milk, rice milk, coconut milk, water, or fruit juices.  Read labels—beware of products labeled “Dairy Free”, like Cool Whip, which often contain casein (milk protein).  Some non-dairy cheese substitutes made from soybeans and almonds may still contain casein to give them a more authentic texture.  Casein is also used as a binder in products like hot dogs, pepperoni, salami and sausage.  Milk protein increases production of mucus-aggravating conditions, such as asthma, bronchitis and sinusitis.  It acts as an irritant to our immune systems, contributing to allergies and autoimmune diseases. 
    Let’s get back to our chocolate chip cookies.  What do we use instead of the butter and milk?  Here are some substitutions that I often use:

    Applesauce (may replace up to ¾ of the butter in a recipe.) Coconut Butter (Use ¾ cup coconut butter for each 1 cup of butter called for in a recipe.) Coconut Milk Lactaid Milk (The lactase enzyme has been added to milk to convert 99% of the lactose into an easily-digestible sugar.  While many lactose-intolerant people are able to safely consume this milk, it contains casein and is not suitable for those on a casein-free diet.) Milk-free Margarine (Fleischmann’s makes a milk-free, gluten-free margarine.  Milk-free margarine may burn if heated too high over direct heat.) Non-Dairy Yogurt Nut Butter Oil (Use ¾ cup corn, vegetable or olive oil for each cup of butter called for in a recipe.) Rice Milk Soymilk (Each brand of soymilk reacts differently.  Some will give an un-wanted color to your dish; others cannot be heated to a high temperature.  When substituting soymilk for cream, add a little vegetable oil to achieve the right consistency.  Read labels carefully, as some commercial soymilk products are not gluten-free.) Vegetable Shortening When in doubt about the diary-free status of a product, the Kosher symbols found on some packages may also be used as a guide:
    UD:  Contains diary KD:  The product has milk protein. DE:  The product was produced on equipment shared with dairy products. Pareve  (or Parve):  The product is “neutral”, which means no animal ingredients.  The majority of Parve products are dairy-free.  However, Jewish law states that if the product has less than 1/5% dairy by volume, they may take special measures to allow for the product to be labeled Pareve. Now we just have to search for safe chocolate chips for our cookies.  Many of the darker chocolates do not contain diary or gluten, for example, “Now” brand carob chips contain no dairy or gluten.Eureka!  You have successfully converted your chocolate chip recipe!  Eat and enjoy!  The important thing to remember is that there are always good, viable substitutions available.  The more diet restrictions you have, the more innovative you have to be with your cooking.  There is almost nothing you cannot eat—you just have to learn to make it a little differently—enjoy!
    Table 1

    Almond flour Amaranth flour Brown rice flour Buckwheat flour Chestnut flour Corn flour Fava bean flour Flax Seed Flour Garbanzo bean flour (Chickpea flour) Lentil flour Mung bean flour Pea flour Potato flour Potato starch flour Pure Cornmeal Sorghum flour Sweet potato flour Sweet rice flour Tapioca flour White bean flour White rice flour

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