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    Applesauce-Oat Muffins (Gluten-Free and may be Dairy, Soy and Egg-Free)


    Jules Shepard

    Ingredients:


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    ½ cup granulated cane sugar

    ½ cup butter or Earth Balance Buttery Sticks (dairy-free & vegan) or Earth Balance Buttery Spread (dairy-free and soy-free & vegan) at room temperature

    ½ cup vanilla yogurt (dairy or soy, coconut or rice)

    1 cup unsweetened applesauce

    2 large eggs (or egg substitute (Ener-G) works great)

    2 cups Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour*

    1 teaspoon baking soda

    2 teaspoons gluten-free baking powder

    2 tablespoons (heaping) flax seed meal

    ¼ cup certified gluten-free oats

    1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon

    ½ teaspoon. nutmeg

    ½ cup baking raisins

    cinnamon-sugar mixture for the tops

    extra oats for the tops

    *(The recipe for my homemade all purpose gluten-free flour blend is in my books, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating, and The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten-Free.  You may also find it on my Web site)

    Directions:

    Gluten-Free Applesauce MuffinsPreheat the oven to 350 F (static) 325 F (convection)

    Oil or line muffin cups and set aside (makes approximately 15 regular sized muffins or 48 mini-muffins)

    Combine the sugar and butter in a large mixing bowl, beating until fluffy. Add in the eggs or egg substitute, applesauce and yogurt, and mix well.

    In a separate bowl, whisk together all the dry ingredients. Gradually add them into the wet ingredients and beat until incorporated. Stir in the raisins last.

    Fill muffin cups to 2/3 full and then sprinkle cinnamon-sugar and additional oats on top.

    Bake for approximately 20 minutes for mini-muffins, 25-30 minutes for regular sized muffins. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely...Enjoy!

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    Guest Kelly

    Posted

    These are great. At first I was deterred by the long ingredient list, but then I realized I had most of these items around the house. These were actually pretty easy and well worth it.

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  • About Me

    Atop each of Jules Shepard’s free weekly recipe newsletters is her mantra: “Perfecting Gluten-Free Baking, Together.” From her easy-to-read cookbook (“Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten Free Eating”) to her highly rated reference for making the transition to living gluten free easier (“The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten Free”), Jules is tireless in the kitchen, at the keyboard and in person in helping people eating gluten free do it with ease, with style and with no compromises.
     
    In the kitchen, she creates recipes for beautiful, tasty gluten-free foods that most people could never tell are gluten free. As a writer, she produces a steady stream of baking tips, living advice, encouragement and insights through magazine articles, her web site (gfJules.com), newsletter, e-books and on sites like celiac.com and others. Jules also maintains a busy schedule of speaking at celiac and gluten-free gatherings, appearing on TV and radio shows, baking industry conventions, as well as teaching classes on the ease and freedom of baking at home.
     
    Her patent-pending all-purpose flour literally has changed lives for families who thought going gluten free meant going without. Thousands read her weekly newsletter, follow her on Twitter and interact with her on FaceBook.  

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    Scott Adams
    Cinnamon rolls are an occasional indulgence that we all deserve. In our home we dont make them often so they are very special. It is challenging to recreate the exact texture of a cinnamon roll but these come close. Substitutions:
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    Though I havent tried it, I believe that a dairy-free version would include substituting the dry milk powder with ground almonds in the Workable Wonder Dough recipe. Water could substitute for the milk in the Cinnamon Roll recipe (butter could be substituted with a non-dairy margarine).
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    Karen Robertson
    Cinnamon Rolls
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    Jules Shepard
    I’ll admit that I am a sucker for anything sweet potato. In preparation for a gluten-free Thanksgiving cooking class I was teaching, I decided to break out of my usual habit of making one of my favorite sweet potato casseroles in order to create something more colorful, more fresh, more crunchy, more crisp, more the total embodiment of autumn…this might not be all that, but it got my juices flowing, and my class loved the new twist on this old favorite!

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    3 tablespoons water
    ½ teaspoon salt
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    ¼ cup dried cranberries, raisins or cherries
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Gluten-Free Corned Beef Recipe
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    6 pounds corned brisket of beef
    6 peppercorns, or gluten-free packaged pickling spices
    3 carrots, peeled and quartered
    3 onions, peeled and quartered
    1 medium-sized green cabbage, quartered or cut in wedges
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    **
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    Amazing Gluten-free Irish Soda Bread
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    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum
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    1 cup granulated sugar
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    Connie Sarros
    This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2002 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 11/08/2011 - Are you a bit overweight?  If you wear the same two outfits all the time because nothing else in your closet fits, you may be a prime candidate for a “Low Calorie” Gluten-free regimen.
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    1/8 teaspoon pepper
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    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
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