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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/27/2015 - You can thank me for this later, after this delicious homemade mustard has dazzled your hot dogs, souped-up your sausages and generally brightened your culinary life. This recipe makes about 1 cup of mustard that will keep up to a year in your refrigerator.
    Ingredients:
    ½ cup mustard powder ½ cup mustard seeds ⅓-½ cup dry white wine ⅓ cup cider or white wine vinegar ¼ cup water 2 tablespoons honey, to taste 1 teaspoon ground turmeric ½ teaspoon salt a few teaspoons warm water, as needed 1 tablespoon prepared or fresh grated horseradish (to taste) Directions:
    Lightly grind the whole mustard seeds by hand with a mortar and pestle.
    You want them mostly whole, just a bit crushed.
    Pour the semi-ground seeds into a bowl and add the salt and mustard powder. If using, add one of the optional ingredients, too.
    Pour in the vinegar and wine or water, then stir well.
    When everything is together, pour into a glass jar and store in the fridge.
    Wait at least 12 hours before using.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/08/2015 - I love soup, and I especially love a light, fresh tasty summer soup. This recipe for vegetable soup comes together quickly, and makes a perfect anchor to to a light, nutritious summer meal. I like to serve it with cooked brown rice, which I add to the soup.
    Ingredients:
    4 ears of fresh corn, removed from the cob 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium onion 1 clove garlic, sliced thin 2 cans chicken broth 2 large fresh zucchini 8 ounces fresh green beans 1 can diced tomatoes in juice Coarse salt ground pepper Directions:
    Filly husk and clean the corn of any corn silk.
    Trim the tip off each ear of corn.
    Get a wide bowl, and one at a time, stand each cob on its end, and gently slice downward with a sharp knife to release the kernels.
    Toss out the cobs, and set the kernels aside.
    In a stock pot, heat oil to medium hot. Add onion, and stir in salt and pepper.
    Continue to stir, while cooking about 3-5 minutes, until onion is clear.
    Add broth and 2 cups water; bring to a boil.
    Add zucchini, green beans, corn, and tomatoes with juice.
    Simmer 10-12 minutes until vegetables are cooked, but somewhat crisp, to taste.
    Season with salt and pepper.
    Serve with cooked brown rice, as desired.

    Lisa Cantkier
    Celiac.com 03/08/2017 - With summer coming soon, many parents want their child to experience summer camp. If your child has gluten intolerance (and/or other special dietary needs) the summer camp anticipation and experience itself can be anxiety provoking for you, and for your child. As a parent, it is normal to have concerns about sending your child to camp, of course, particularly when the camp is providing meals. Here are some simple tips to help you advocate for your gluten intolerant child, and keep him/her safe at camp this summer. Not only should parents be their child's advocate - parents also need to teach their child how to be a well educated self advocate. Many of these tips are also applicable to school settings, birthday parties and other social gatherings.
    Prior to each camp session, schedule a meeting with your child's supervising camp staff to discuss your child's dietary needs. Be very clear about what your child can and can't tolerate, as well as the short-term and long-term consequences of consumption of those foods. Bring copies of helpful facts and information, and even myths to educate the staff. You can also bring helpful books and/or videos to share. Any notes from your child's health professionals may be helpful as well. Let the staff know you mean business and you take your child's needs very seriously. Your child should never be turned away from a camp due to their dietary needs. That would be a conflict of the Human Rights Code!
    Request that your child's camp staff post an educational fact sheet in the camp office, staffroom, and main rooms in the camp building about his/her dietary needs and condition (e.g., celiac disease), as well as a list of foods that your child must avoid.
    Get a medical alert bracelet for your child, and list your child's condition(s) (e.g.,. celiac disease), as well as your child's dietary needs clearly (e.g., gluten intolerant). Allerbling.com is a great resource and they offer fun colors and patterns.
    Ask the camp staff if you can come into the camp one day and have a discussion with the campers about your child's condition/food intolerance. You can even find out if you can bring in props, such as products your child is and is not allowed. You might want to bring in a short video about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.
    Find out if there will be birthdays being celebrated at camp, and then contact the parents of the birthday child the week before, and again the day before the birthday party to inform and remind them about your child's food intolerance. You could also offer to bring treats that your child is allowed.
    Send some "back up" snacks and treats for your child for camp staff to store, even if it's a package of cookies, or a cupcake – just in case there are celebrations or times when treats are given out that your child cannot have.
    Teach your child about his/her food intolerance, and teach your child to share the information with others. It is a good idea for your child to learn how to self-advocate at a young age. If your child is very young, you can teach through the use of puppets. Research shows that young children learn very well through the use of puppets.
    Many non-profit associations offer camps, support groups and educational programs for children. Gather information from trusted organizations such as the Canadian Celiac Association or the Celiac Sprue Association.
    Be positive – learn to look on the bright side, and teach your child to do so as well. There are many advantages to living gluten-free. Keeping positive and demonstrating strength will make your child stronger and better able to cope. Remind your child regularly that their differences are what make them special!

    Amie  Valpone
    My Summer Picnic Recipe List
    Celiac.com 03/10/2018 - There's something so fun about summertime picnics; everyone is always so excited to whip up a batch of their famous gluten-free pasta salad or cornbread.  Whether you're bringing along the red and white checker tablecloth and wicker basket or simply using a towel and a canvas tote - there's always fun to be had at a picnic.  It may be nothing fancier than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich but you're still likely to have a fabulous time with good friends and tasty food.
    After 30 years of picnics, I've seen just about every dish – the potato salad, the Jell-O mold and the deviled eggs.  But no matter how faithful you are to your picnic favorites I'll bet you'll find a few tasty options below to keep your taste buds happy this picnic season.  Here are a few of my tasty gluten-free favorites to bring along to my summertime picnic soirees.
    Fresh Mozzarella and Balsamic Peaches: Toss together 4 sliced peaches, 12 mini balls of fresh mozzarella, 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar, 1 small red onion, 2 Tbsp. rosemary, 2 Tbsp. olive oil, 1 tsp. lemon juice, sea salt and pepper.  
    Beet Salad Pitas: Peel beets and grate them in a food processor; add ½ cup pistachios, 1 Tbsp. orange zest, 2 Tbsp. orange juice, 2 Tbsp. olive oil, 1 cup Greek plain yogurt and ½ tsp. fresh parsley stuffed into gluten-free pitas.
    Avocado Hummus and Fruit Skewers: Combine 2 ripe avocados, 1 cup black beans, ½ cup cilantro, 1 cup corn, 1 pint cherry tomatoes, sea salt, pepper, 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice, 1/3 tsp. chili powder and ¼ tsp. cumin in a food processor; pulse until smooth.  Serve with fresh fruit skewers of apples, pineapple and jicama chunks.
    Curried Deviled Eggs: Hard boil a dozen eggs.  Slice each egg in half, remove yolks. Combine yolks with Greek plain yogurt, curry powder, Dijon mustard, lime juice, sea salt, white pepper, cilantro, red onion and diced apple; mix well.  Place a Tablespoon of mixture into each egg white half and serve.
    Sweet Potato Pesto Turkey Wraps: Combine 4 baked sweet potatoes, 8 Tbsp. olive oil, sea salt and pepper, 2 ½ cups fresh parsley, ½ cup pine nuts, 1/3 cup walnuts, 1 clove garlic, 1 tsp. lemon juice, ½ tsp. lemon zest in a food processor; pulse until smooth.  Spread atop organic slices of turkey and roll up.
    Peanut Edemame: Toss together 1 cup cooked edemame, 1 Tbsp. smooth peanut butter, 1 tsp. honey, 2 tsp. warm water, 1 tsp. sesame seeds; gently toss to combine.
    Sunshine Tea with Fresh Mint: Combine 4 cups of boiling water, 4 green tea bags, 1 freshly sliced lemon and 1/3 cup fresh mint leaves in a large pitcher. Set in the sun for 8 hours. Serve over ice.
    Bon appétit!

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    • Maureen and Cyclinglady, Of the foods you listed. . .. I would focus on the Chocolate. Chocolate has Tyramine in it and it could/can cause rashes that  might be confused for DH. Sometimes Tyramine get's confused for/in high sulfite foods as triggers. Here is a great overview article on this topic. http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-red-wine-headache-health-0608-20160525-story.html you might also have trouble with headaches if it tyramine is causing you your trouble. People who have trouble Tyramine might also have trouble with consuming cheeses. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2738414/ As for the Milk causing/triggering your DH don't rule Adult onset dairy allergy. While rare it does occur in the literature/research when you search it out. I am including the research here in the hopes it might help you or someone else entitled "Adult onset of cow's milk protein allergy with small‐intestinal mucosal IgE mast cells" https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1398-9995.1996.tb04640.x It is generally thought most of grow out of a Milk Allergy at approx. 3 years old. But for some lucky one (I guess) we never do apparently.  (I speak for my friend on this board JMG).  He found out he was having trouble with dairy as an adult better never realized until about 6 months ago. With delayed onset allergies it is often hard to tell if it (allergen) is effecting us because we might not associate it with our dairy consumption because it might happen a day or two latter. See this WHFoods article about food allergens/sensitivies.  It is very long/exhaustive but it is very helpful if you have time to study it in more detail. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?pfriendly=1&tname=faq&dbid=30 I will quote some key points for your information. Symptoms of Food Allergies "The most common symptoms for food allergies include vomiting, diarrhea, blood in stools, eczema, hives, skin rashes, wheezing and a runny nose. Symptoms can vary depending upon a number of variables including age, the type of allergen (antigen), and the amount of food consumed. It may be difficult to associate the symptoms of an allergic reaction to a particular food because the response time can be highly variable. For example, an allergic response to eating fish will usually occur within minutes after consumption in the form of a rash, hives or asthma or a combination of these symptoms. However, the symptoms of an allergic reaction to cow's milk may be delayed for 24 to 48 hours after consuming the milk; these symptoms may also be low-grade and last for several days. If this does not make diagnosis difficult enough, reactions to foods made from cow's milk may also vary depending on how it was produced and the portion of the milk to which you are allergic. Delayed allergic reactions to foods are difficult to identify without eliminating the food from your diet for at least several weeks and slowly reintroducing it while taking note of any physical, emotional or mental changes as it is being reintroduced." Here is their information on Tyramine's. Tyramine "Reactions to tyramine (an amino acid-like molecule) or phenylalanine (another amino acid-like molecule) can result from eating the following foods: Fermented cheeses Fermented Sausage Chocolate Sour Cream Red wine Avocado Beer Raspberries Yeast Picked Herring Symptoms of tyramine intolerance can include urticaria (hives), angioedema (localized swelling due to fluid retention), migraines, wheezing, and even asthma. In fact, some researchers suggest that as many as 20 percent of migraines are caused by food intolerance or allergy, and tyramine intolerance is one of the most common of these toxic food responses." Here is an old thread on tyramine and especially how it can trigger headaches. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/95457-headache-culprit-is-tyramine/ I would also suggest your research a low histamine food diet.  Rashes/hives etc. can be triggered my disregulaton of histamine in the body. The other thing in chocolate that might be causing your problems is Sulfites. Here is a website dedicated to a Sulftie allergy. http://www.allergy-details.com/sulfites/foods-contain-sulfites/ Chocolate bars are on their list of sulfite contaning foods but probably most noted in dried fruits and red wine. Knitty Kitty on this board knows alot about a sulfite allergy. I want to go back to the possible dairy allergy for a second as a possible trigger. . .because it has been established as connected to DH . . .it is just not well known. Here is current research (as I said earlier) most dairy allergies are studied in children but it does occur in approx. 10 pct of the GP unless your of Asian descent where it is much more common. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29555204 quoting the new research from this year on children. "When CMP (Cow's Milk Protein) was re-introduced, anti-tTG increased, and returned to normal after the CMP was withdrawn again." and if adults can also (though rarely) it seem develop "Adult onset of cow's milk protein allergy with small‐intestinal mucosal IgE mast cells" (see research linked above) as the research shows  you should at least trial removing dairy from your diet if you haven't already and see if your DH doesn't come back when you re-introduce it. It just takes 15 or 20 years for medical doctor' to incorporate new research/thinking into clinical practice.  And note the research on this happening in adults is 20+ years old and as far I know doctor's . . . are not aware of this.  I know I wasn't until recently and I research things alot of to help myself and my friends. But I know you can't do what you don't know about.  So this is why I am trying to share what I learned so that other might be helped and this research might not  lay hidden another 20 years before doctor's and their Celiac/DH patients become aware of it. And if it helps you come back on the board and let us know so it can help others too! If it helps you it will/can help someone else! if they know it helped you then they will/can have hope it might help them too and why I share and research these things for others'. . . who don't know or don't have time to research this for themselves. I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice. Good luck on your continued journey. I know this is a lot of information to digest at one time but I hope at least some of if it helpful and you at least have a better idea of what in your chocolate could be causing your DH (idiopathic) as the doctor's say (of an unknown cause mild) DH symptom's. Or at least it is not commonly known yet that Milk can also cause trigger (DH) in children and adults who have a Milk allergy undiagnosed. . .because we don't don't typically think  or associate it with adults like maybe we should if we are not of Asian descent. Maureen if this doesn't help you you might want to start a thread in the DH section of the forum. As always  2 Timothy 2: 7   “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included. Posterboy by the grace of God,
    • I hooe you can get some answers with your new GI doc.
    • Many of us deal with doctor issues and diagnosis, you got a really bad draw indeed. Most doctors dismiss Celiac as their is no money in the cure for them IE a gluten free diet and not medications.

      Keep up updated on your new doctor and testing, good to see you finally found one that listens and can help, I got through on doc #5 I think it was.
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