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    Gluten-Free Pizza Crust / Focaccia Bread by Karen Robertson

    Scott Adams

    Celiac.com 01/11/2005 - Pizza crust is an essential item in the gluten-free kitchen, especially for families with celiac children. This class demonstrates how to make an excellent pizza crust with a variation on the recipe for focaccia bread. Alternative flours will be used and their health benefits detailed.

    This recipe is adapted from Bette Hagmans first book The Gluten-Free Gourmet. Healthy flours and the tricks I have learned over the years are part of this revised recipe. You may use brown rice flour if you cant find the amaranth, buckwheat, or teff flour, although the health benefits of these alternative flours make them well worth the search.

    This recipe makes two 13-inch pizzas, or four 10-inch pizzas.

    Ingredients:

    1½ cups brown rice flour
    ½ cup amaranth, buckwheat, or teff flour
    2 cups tapioca flour
    2/3 cup instant non-fat dry milk powder (dairy-free: 2/3 cup ground almond meal)
    3 teaspoons xanthan gum
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons active dry yeast
    1 tablespoon sugar
    1½ cups water (105-115F.) or less
    3 tablespoons olive oil
    4 egg whites at room temperature (egg-free: see "flaxseed" in tips section)
    Olive oil for spreading pizza dough

    Grease two 13-inch pizza pans, using organic shortening. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the flours, milk powder, xanthan gum, salt, yeast, and sugar. In a measuring cup, combine the water and 3 tablespoons olive oil. Add olive oil-water mixture to dry ingredients, then egg whites, mixing well after each addition. Beat on high speed for 4 minutes.

    Divide dough into two (or four) equal portions. Place each portion on a prepared pizza pan. Cover your hand with a clean plastic bag. Drizzle about a tablespoon of olive oil over your hand and one portion of dough. Spread the dough out evenly over the pizza pan, forming a ridge around the edge to contain the pizza toppings. Repeat process for second portion of dough. Let dough rise for about 20 minutes. Preheat oven to 400?F. Bake pizza crusts for 7 minutes (until lightly golden) and remove from oven. At this point you can either cool the crusts, wrapping and freezing them for future use, or you can spread tomato sauce on the crust and top with your favorite toppings.

    Focaccia Bread

    While infinite versions exist, my preference for focaccia bread is a flat, round, chewy, bread brushed with olive oil, rubbed with garlic and sprinkled with rosemary. Follow the same instructions as above though you may want to allow the dough to rise another 15 minutes or so before baking the bread. You may want to bake the bread longer for a more golden crust. Another topping variation is olive oil, sliced shallots, and chopped green or black olives.

    Plain focaccia bread is also good served with a tapenade or dip.

    Reprinted with permission from:
    Cooking Gluten-Free! A Food Lovers Collection of Chef and Family
    Recipes Without Gluten or Wheat
    by Karen Robertson

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    Guest Irène Mongrain

    Posted

    I made it and I loved it. Thank you.

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    I tried this pizza recipe tonight. I was very surprised that it was so good. I made regular pizza for my guests and the gluten free for myself, but they all had a piece of mine and thought it was just as good as the regular. when I was concerned that the dough was so sticky when I finished mixing. I made 2 pizzas and spread the dough on parchment paper to let it rise. I have a pizza paddle, so I used that to lift paper and all on to my hot stone. later i realized that I left out the ½ cup amaranth. since the dough was totally unfamiliar to work with. sticky and wet, when I realized I forgot the amaranth, I thought that was the problem, but the finished pizza was really good. Thanks so much for helping me with my craving. I'm new to all this and cut out gluten and wheat because of an autoimmune disease. Before the guests arrived, I baked one of the rounds. when it came out of the oven, my boyfriend ate it with butter like a fresh baked bread. Very delicious.

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    Not bad but be sure to activate the yeast before you add it (let yeast in water until little bubbles appear) or the bread probably won't rise I followed the recipe as is and have a great portion but it didn't rise.

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    Guest Garrett

    Posted

    Great recipe, I put about 3 times the amount of salt called for and made it vegan using a gluten free egg replace and almond meal instead of milk. Great for pesto pizza especially if made with buckwheat!

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    Guest Brandee

    Posted

    Thank you so much! This is great bread. Being recently diagnosed with celiac has been quite the adventure in baking. This is one of two breads which I have made that I can tolerate.

     

    Very close to the traditional, and superb used as a nice pizza crust!

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    Guest Marni

    Posted

    I'm not very experienced with pizza dough, and I may have done something wrong. It was so sticky I couldn't do a thing with it. I tried adding brown rice flour to make it workable, but no luck! I waited the 20 minutes before I worked with it, so that was probably wrong too.

    But, I threw it on the pizza pan and baked it anyway! It doesn't look good, but it's delicious!

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    This sounds delicious. I can't wait to try it.

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    Guest Christen

    Posted

    Can this dough be stored in the fridge or freezer as regular pizza dough can?

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    Guest Ashley

    Posted

    Can you freeze the ball of dough and then thaw and bake later?

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    Guest Angela

    Posted

    Great taste and texture, saved the recipe and will certainly make again. made one with marinara sauce and traditional toppings, the other with chicken pesto. The only problem was the sticky mess trying to spread it out on the pizza pan. I prefer a thinner crust and this recipe isn't possible to get it thin enough. Even though it was thicker than I prefer as i said, it was yummy and I will make again. My husband doesn't care as long as it's pizza. Thanks!

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