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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Gluten-free St. Patrick's Day

    Celiac.com 03/11/2011 - St. Patrick's Day is once again upon us, which means it's a good time to prepare for a successful gluten-free celebration of the wearing of the green.

    One good thing for people on a gluten-free diet is that most traditional corned beef and cabbage recipes are gluten free. So, of course, are carrots and potatoes.

    If you plan of making corned beef, you should know that most commercial corned beef is gluten free. Some brands that are specifically labeled 'gluten free,' or which the makers' websites claim to be gluten-free, include:

    • Brookfield Farms
    • Colorado Premium - all corned beef products
    • Cook's
    • Freirich - all corned beef
    • Giant Eagle
    • Grobbel's Gourmet corned beef briskets
    • Hormel
    • Libby's Canned Meats (Corned Beef and Corned Beef Hash)
    • Market Day: Corned Beef Brisket
    • Mosey's corned beef
    • Nathan's corned beef
    • Safeway, Butchers cut bulk-wrapped corned beef brisket, corn beef brisket, vac-packed cooked corn beef
    • Thuman’s cooked corn beef brisket, first cut corned beef (cooked and raw), top round corned beef (cooked), cap and capless corned beef
    • Wegmans corned beef brisket.
    Many other brands not listed are also gluten free. Be sure to read the ingredients on the package, including those for any extra seasonings. Some labels may list natural flavorings, which rarely contain gluten. Still, if you're not sure, try to check the manufacturer's website, or maybe look for another brand.

    Gluten-Free Corned Beef Recipe

    Ingredients:
    6 pounds corned brisket of beef
    6 peppercorns, or gluten-free packaged pickling spices
    3 carrots, peeled and quartered
    3 onions, peeled and quartered
    1 medium-sized green cabbage, quartered or cut in wedges
    Melted butter (about 4 tablespoons)

    Directions:
    Place the corned beef in water to cover with the peppercorns or mixed pickling spices (in supermarkets, these often come packaged with the corned beef). Cover the pot or kettle, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 5 hours or until tender, skimming occasionally. During the last hour, add the carrots and onions and cover again. During the last 15 minutes, add the cabbage. Transfer meat and vegetables to a platter and brush the vegetables with the melted butter.

    Serve with boiled parsley potatoes, cooked separately. (The stock can be saved to add to a pot roast or stew instead of other liquid.)

    Serves 6, with meat left over for additional meals.

    **

    For those who love Irish soda bread, the following soda bread recipe is a modified version of the Irish Soda Bread recipe from Easy Gluten-Free Baking by Elizabeth Barbone (2009 Lake Isle Press). This version skips caraway seeds, because I hate them. However, if you are so inclined, you can add a tablespoon with the last dry ingredients before baking.

    Amazing Gluten-free Irish Soda Bread

    Ingredients:
    Vegetable shortening for pan
    White Rice Flour for pan
    3 1/2 cups white rice flour
    1/2 cup sweet rice flour
    1/4 cup cornstarch
    1/4 cup potato starch (not potato flour)
    5 teaspoons baking powder (Gluten Free)
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum
    1 1/2 cups currants
    1 cup (2 sticks) butter softened
    2 large eggs
    1 cup granulated sugar
    2 cups buttermilk

    Directions:
    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and Grease and rice flour a 9 inch springform pan.

    2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients

    3. In a large bowl, cream together butter, eggs, and sugar until light and fluffy, about 1 minute.

    Use high speed on a handheld mixer or medium-high on a stand mixer. Stir in half of the dry ingredients. Use low speed on a handheld mixer or stand mixer for this. Stir in buttermilk until thoroughly combined. Add remaining dry ingredients and caraway seeds (if desired) and raisins.

    4. Pour batter into prepared pan and spread evenly. Bake about 1 1/2 hours or until a tester inserted in center comes out clean.

    5. Place pan on a wire rack to cool. About 5 minutes. Remove Bread from pan and allow to cool completely on rack. Makes 1 loaf.


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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    makes 1½ pounds dough You will probably find many uses for this good, user-friendly dough. Recipe from Wendy Warks Living Healthy with Celiac Disease (AnAffect, 1998). Wendy uses this for pretzels, breadsticks, cinnamon rolls, and pizza crust. Use it as a substitution for wheat flour dough in your favorite recipes.
    2 teaspoons unflavored dry gelatin
    2¼ teaspoons active dry yeast
    2/3 cup warm water (105F-115F)
    2 tablespoons sugar
    2½ cups Wendy Wark's Gluten-Free Flour Mix
    2½ teaspoons xanthan gum
    ¼ cup instant non-fat dry milk powder
    ½ teaspoon salt
    3 tablespoons vegetable oil
    2 eggs
    Combine gelatin, yeast, water, and sugar together in a 2-cup glass measure. Let stand for 5 minutes, or until foamy. In the bowl of a stand mixer, add flour mix, xanthan gum, milk powder, and salt. Mix briefly, then add oil and eggs, followed by yeast mixture. Beat on high speed for 2 minutes, using the paddle attachment until a soft dough forms. Use dough in your favorite recipe.
    Karen Robertson

    Jules Shepard
    This recipe may be prepared using a mixer and oven or in a bread machine. This loaf is light and airy, yet substantial enough to use as sandwich bread (however, if you want a denser loaf, simply add 1/4 cup dry milk powder to the dry ingredients).
    The recipe boasts the addition of flax seed meal and flax seeds which contribute a large amount of dietary fiber and other beneficial nutritional properties like high omega 3.  The simple addition of two tablespoons of flax seed meal to this bread also adds four grams of dietary fiber and three grams of protein.  As an alternative, you can simply use 2 eggs in place of the flax seed and water mixture, and you will add the dry yeast to the dough at the final mixing step.
    When using a bread machine, always be sure to add all liquid ingredients to the pan first, followed by the dry ingredients. I recommend sifting all dry ingredients (except yeast) together in a bowl first, then pouring it into the bread machine pan. If the dough seems too thick, gradually add more yogurt, one quarter cup at a time, until the dough is still thick, but able to be smoothed with a spatula. Be sure to check the bread with a spatula throughout the mixing process to ensure that all the dry ingredients have been incorporated. Smooth the top with a rubber spatula and when done mixing, sprinkle any desired toppings on top of the loaf. Select either the gluten-free bread setting on your machine, or the quickest bake setting like a light crust 1 ½ pound loaf. Remove the pan from the machine when finished baking (internal temperature should be between 205-210F).
    When making with a mixer and oven, follow the specific directions outlined below.

    Ingredients:
    2 Tablespoons ground flax seeds or flax seed meal
    ½ cup very hot water
    1 tsp. granulated cane sugar
    1 Tablespoon rapid rise or bread machine yeast
    ¼ cup Earth Balance Shortening, cut into small pieces (or canola oil, if using a bread machine)
    3 ¼ cups Jules Gluten FreeTM All Purpose Flour *
    ½ teaspoon baking soda
    2 teaspoons gluten-free baking powder
    Pinch of salt
    2 Tablespoons honey
    1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
    1 ½ cup vanilla yogurt (dairy or soy)
    1 Tablespoon flax seeds
    Toppings of choice (coarse sea salt, sesame seeds, flax seeds, etc.)

    (* I cannot predict how this recipe will work with any other flour mixture but my own.  The mix recipe may be found in media links on my website and in my book, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating, or pre-mixed from my website.)Directions:
    In a small bowl, add the hot water and flax seed meal and stir. Let sit for 5 minutes. Add the yeast and one teaspoon of sugar to this mixture and stir. Set aside for 5 more minutes for it to begin to bubble and grow; if the mixture does not bubble or grow, throw it out and re-mix with fresh yeast. Sift remaining dry ingredients together in a large bowl. Cut in the pieces of shortening using a pastry cutter or the dough paddle on your mixer. Add the remaining liquid ingredients next, mixing well. Finally, mix in the yeast/flax seed meal mixture and stir well using the dough paddle. If the dough seems too thick to form a loaf, gradually mix in more yogurt, one quarter cup at a time, until the dough is still thick, but able to be smoothed with a spatula.

    Scoop the dough into a greased bread pan (use a dark metal pan if you like a darker crust on your bread; lighter, shiny metal or glass if you like a light crust). Smooth the top, sprinkle with any toppings, then cover with a sheet of wax paper sprayed with cooking oil. Sit the covered dough for 30 minutes in a warm place like an oven warming drawer or even in your oven with the light on.
    Remove the raised dough to a preheated convection oven set to 275 F or a preheated static oven set to 300 F. Cook for approximately 60 minutes, or until the crust is browning nicely and a cake tester or skewer inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean (internal temperature should be 205-210F). Remove to a cooling rack and rotate gently from side to side every 5 minutes or so if it looks like your loaf wants to sink at all in the middle. When cooled for 15 minutes or more, remove from the loaf pan to finish cooling before slicing.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com's Best Gluten-free Holiday Stuffing Recipe (Gluten Free Thanksgiving Dressing)
    Stuffing is standard fare at just about every Thanksgiving or holiday meal that involves a bird. This recipe will help those with gluten-sensitivities to keep the stuffing right there on the plate next to the turkey. Served with mashed potatoes, gluten-free gravy, and maybe a little cranberry sauce, and you've got the makings of a great gluten-free holiday!
    Ingredients:
    5-6 cups white, gluten-free bread (about 2 loaves), cut into one-inch cubes, toasted and cooled
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    3 cups celery, chopped
    2 shallots, minced
    1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, chopped
    1 tablespoon fresh thyme, minced
    1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced
    1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced
    1-1½ cups gluten-free chicken broth
    ½ cup white wine
    1 egg yolk
    1 teaspoon salt
    ½ teaspoon pepper
    Bits of cooked sausage or bacon, diced chestnut, pecan, apple, cranberry, currant, or raisin (optional) *Make sure any sausage is gluten-free!
    Preparation:
    Sauté shallots, onion and celery in olive oil on medium-low heat until translucent.
    Stir in the rosemary, sage, and thyme, and cook another one or two minutes, until the aroma of the herbs fills the air. Add wine and continue cooking over medium heat until liquid is reduced by half. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
    Bring the chicken stock to boil on high heat. Note: If cooking stuffing inside turkey, add just 1 cup of chicken broth.
    Place the egg yolk in a large bowl and carefully spoon two or three ounces of the chicken stock into the egg yolk, slowly, while whisking the mixture.
    Add the rest of the chicken stock to the egg mixture. Make sure to blend a small amount of stock into the egg first to prevent scrambled eggs.
    Add the cooled celery, onion, and herbs mixture into the stock and egg mixture. Toss the bread cubes into this mixture and coat thoroughly. Add the salt and pepper and mix.
    Place the stuffing mixture into a greased casserole dish and cook  in 400°F oven for 40-50 min, covering as needed with aluminum foil, until done.
    Note: The stuffing is done when you can insert a toothpick into the stuffing and it comes out clean. Make sure you bake stuffing until the toothpick comes out clean.
    Serves about six to eight people. Scale recipe according to amount of stuffing required.
    Suggestion: Add finely diced cooked sausage or bacon bits to the sautéed vegetables, or toss in bits of diced chestnut, pecan, apple, cranberry, currant, or raisins.


    Connie Sarros
    Cornbread, Cakes, Cookies, Crusts - Eat and Enjoy…Just by Changing a Few Ingredients!
    This article originally appeared in the Summer 2002 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
    What was your first reaction when your doctor told you that anything containing gluten had to be eliminated from your diet?  After you stopped screaming, “But I HAVE to have my pizza!” did you begin to panic?  Know this—there is almost NOTHING that you used to eat before being diagnosed that you cannot eat now; you just have to learn to make it a little differently.
    If you don’t know how to do something it can seem difficult at first, but with a little experience it becomes easy.  This same principle applies to the multitude of combinations of the various alternative flours used in gluten-free baking.  The basic gluten-free flour mixture consists of 2 cups rice flour, 1 cup potato starch flour, and 1 cup tapioca flour.  This combination may be used to replace wheat flour in most of your recipes.  However, there are as many combinations of flours as you have imagination, each serving a different purpose.  Do you want your cakes to be lighter?  Add a little bean flour to your mixture (not too much or it will leave an aftertaste).  Garbanzo and/or mung bean flours are excellent for this purpose.  Want to make bread?  Make a flour mixture with mostly potato starch flour, tapioca flour and cornstarch.  If you can find the elusive sweet potato flour (sold at most Asian markets), add it to your cookie flour mixture to improve its texture.  Each type of flour has its own unique properties and taste, and if you find a combination of flours that you really like, sift large amounts together, spoon it into freezer bags, and freeze them until needed.  This will put an end to you having to drag out all of the different bags and boxes of flours each time you want to bake.
    For those new to the gluten-free diet you will notice that when you bite into a muffin or cookie it may fall apart.  Alternative flours do not bind as well as wheat flour, so it is necessary to add a binder to them.  Do not be intimidated by the name xanthan gum.  It is a white powder that is usually packaged in a small pouch and can be found at most health food stores.  Add a little xanthan gum to a recipe to prevent your baked goods from crumbling.  Guar gum may also be used in place of the xanthan gum, but in some people it can have a laxative effect.  Unflavored gelatin may also be added as a binder in place of the gums; just be sure to use twice as much of it in the recipe to replace the gum.
    You will find that the alternative flours are heavier and don’t have as much taste as wheat flour.  Not to worry - add twice the amount of baking soda or baking powder called for in the wheat version of the recipe.  You can also double the amount of flavoring (vanilla, almond, etc.).  Use your imagination and add extra ingredients that will enhance the taste…toasted nuts or coconut, chocolate pieces, Kahlua, dried fruits, fresh fruits, etc.
    Many people with celiac disease also have other dietary concerns, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, lactose intolerance, casein-free, low or no sugar, allergies to yeast, corn, soy, berries, rice, nuts, eggs, etc.  Even with other dietary restrictions, you can usually find alternative methods of preparation for most foods.  The trick is to recreate the original taste and texture when you substitute ingredients.  For example, in place of cane sugar you can use date sugar, beet sugar, fructose, canned fruit packed in juice, unsweetened applesauce, a jar of baby strained prunes, shredded apples, mashed bananas or pure fruit juices.  Toasting unsweetened coconut brings out the natural oils and will add a wonderful toasty sweetness to a baked product.  If you need to limit your salt intake use herbs (lots of them!) as a replacement.  Adding a lot of chopped celery to soups and stews will alleviate the need to add so much salt.
    Eggs add moisture and act as a binder in a baked product.  If you cannot have them you can use one of the following replacement recipes for each 1 to 2 eggs called for in the recipe:

    1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 Tablespoon liquid, and 1 Tablespoon vinegar 1 teaspoon yeast dissolved in ¼ cup warm water 1 ½ Tablespoons water, 1 ½ Tablespoons oil, 1 teaspoon gluten-free baking powder 1 packet unflavored gelatin, 2 Tablespoons warm water (Do not mix until ready to use.) ¼ cup soft silken tofu and ¼ teaspoon baking soda per 1 cup of flour called for in the recipe 3 Tablespoons applesauce plus 3 teaspoons powdered egg replacer If you cannot tolerate rice, replace the rice flour in the baking mixtures with potato starch flour.  For casein-free diets, soy, rice, or coconut milk may be used as replacements for whole milk.  If you want to thicken gravy and can’t use cornstarch, use potato flour (not to be confused with potato starch flour).For those who have to watch their cholesterol, use oil (preferably olive oil) in place of butter.  Cholesterol is essential to life and is a necessary part of our cell structure.  The human body makes an ample amount, so we do not need to consume additional cholesterol.  Cholesterol is only found in foods of animal origin (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products).  Do not confuse this with "fat".  While plants have zero cholesterol, they may be very high in fat content (such as palm and coconut oils).
    There are always ingredient alternatives no matter what your dietary restrictions are.  In most cases you can still make and enjoy your favorite foods.  Be confident that the foods you eat will be as varied and delicious as those you used to eat before.  Life is good and, with a little extra planning, there is no need to stress out about eating.

    Cold Poached Salmon (low fat, low cholesterol, low sodium)
    Here is a cool entrée for those hot summer days, from the WFGF Reduced Calorie Cookbook.When cooking salmon, wash well with cold water, then pat dry with paper toweling.  With a sharp knife, remove skin from fillets before cooking.  The salmon may be poached the night before, then wrapped in plastic wrap and refrigerated.  By eliminating the mayonnaise, this dish will be dairy-free.  To serve, place salmon on top of Julienne Vegetables (recipe on page 42).  Slice 4 thin slices of lemon; cut each slice almost in half, leaving one side of the rind in tact; twist to form an "S" shape, then lay on top of the salmon.
    Ingredients:
    2 cups water
    1 cup gluten-free white wine
    2 Tablespoons lemon juice
    6 bay leaves
    1/8 teaspoon salt
    1/8 teaspoon pepper
    4 fillets (4 oz.  each) salmon
    4 teaspoons gluten-free lowfat mayonnaise
    12 capers
    Directions:
    In a large skillet, combine water, wine, lemon juice, bay leaves, salt and pepper.  Bring to a boil.  Add fillets and simmer gently about 15 minutes or till opaque and fish flakes easily with a fork.  Drain salmon, reserving bay leaves, and cool.   Spread 1 teaspoon mayonnaise on top of each fillet.  To garnish, angle a bay leaf in the center; cluster 3 capers at the base of the leaf.


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    Im the same, I never know what to eat, some food does better than others for me, I went on to make my own soup and Im glad I did, I should do it more often and at least then J know what's going in to it, it wasn't the best first try but I enjoyed it haha
    Thank you for the advice, in the end I went and made my own soup, not great for my first try but it was better than potentially making myself worse, I enjoyed it, I got some vitamains too to take, I was able to find a liquid Vitamain B Complex, the store I went to was helpfull enough to show me what was Gluten Free.   I fealt awful around then, Im feeling like I have more energy now I can actually do things and focus more, Ill keep on like I have been, Im not 100% and still have some B
    Not to mention the fact that (for those using the Nima) the Nima sensor has been known to give false positives. https://www.theverge.com/2019/4/1/18080666/nima-sensor-testing-fda-food-allergy-gluten-peanut-transparency-data https://www.celiac.ca/cca-statement-nima-gluten-sensor/ https://www.allergy-insight.com/nima-is-it-really-96-9-accurate/ https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/news/troubling-gluten-testing-data-released-by-nima-but-hold-the-phone/ https://www.glutenfreew
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