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    Gluten-Free Time Saving Tips in the Kitchen


    Connie Sarros
    Image Caption: Photo: CC--Stopwatch Test

    This article originally appeared in the Winter 2004 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.


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    Celiac.com 09/25/2014 - Every year, life seems to get more hectic.  There is never enough time to get the things done on the ever-growing “to-do” list, let alone find time to relax.  Then you are diagnosed with celiac disease and suddenly realize you can no longer stop at Subway for a hoagie sandwich on your way home.  You get a sinking feeling in the pit of your stomach as you acknowledge that you will have to actually cook most of your own meals at home!  

    Photo: CC--Stopwatch TestThere is no need to panic.  There are many shortcuts that can help you get in and out of the kitchen faster.  Here are just a few:

    • Make a list of all the items you buy at the grocery store.  Make your list very specific, organized by aisles at the store.  Print off multiple copies.  As you run out of things during the week, put a check mark next to the item on your list.  When it is time to go shopping, most of your list will already be done.
    • Keep a “basic pantry.”  These are items you should always have on hand.  Not only does this include spices, household cleaners, paper products, and canned goods, but a back-up pantry meal is always good to stock as well.  This can be anything from cans of beans for a bean salad, gluten-free pork and beans or a can of tuna fish, to gluten-free spaghetti and gluten-free spaghetti sauce.
    • Make extras.  If you are making soup, chili, spaghetti sauce, marinated chicken breasts, cookie dough, etc., make two or three times the quantity you need; freeze the extra portions so you have meals that just need to be popped into the microwave on the days you don’t have time to cook.
    • Use disposable foil cookware for those really messy recipes.  Also, dish out dinners in the kitchen, from pot to plate; that way, you won’t have serving dishes to wash.
    • Soak whole potatoes in hot water before baking them—they will cook much faster.  When potatoes need peeling, peel them after they are cooked when they are cool enough to handle and the skins will slip right off.
    • Use leftovers to make a different meal.  Open a bag of ready-to-use lettuce and top it with last night’s leftover corn, taco filling, diced tomatoes, and sprinkle with gluten-free cheddar cheese.  Or top the salad with thin slices of the leftover roast beef, diced leftover asparagus spears…you get the idea.  You can also chop leftovers into bite-sized pieces and place them in a resealable freezer bag, and the next time you have leftovers toss them in.  When the bag is full, open a large can of gluten-free chicken or beef broth, add the contents of the bag, and voila—you have Recycled Soup!
    • Save the crusts.  If you can’t get the kids to eat their crusts, trim them from their bread and store them in a resealable freezer bag (gluten-free bread is too expensive to buy and too time-consuming to make to throw out the crusts!).  When the bag is full, let the crusts dry out for 24 hours, then run them through a food processor or blender, adding spices like dried parsley, garlic powder, paprika, and/or Italian seasoning, and make breadcrumbs.
    • Use a crock pot.  There are many meals that can be made in crock-pots, such as the recipe that follows.  Cut up your leftover veggies and meat from the night before.  You can also cut up potatoes ahead of time and soak them in cold water in the refrigerator.  In the morning, layer everything in the crock pot, add some liquid (gluten-free barbecue sauce, gluten-free spaghetti sauce, tomato sauce, gluten-free broth, or salsa), turn the temperature to low or slow cook, and eight hours later your meal is ready.

    With a little practice and planning, you can enjoy healthy, quick, gluten-free meals.  Planning ahead is the key to saving time.  Plan your meals for the week, including how you are going to use up the leftovers.  There definitely is time for “life after cooking” on a gluten-free diet.  You can find more quick meal ideas in my book, Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults.

     

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    Guest Sylvia Dellas

    Posted

    I cook two cups of raw brown rice at a time and freeze it in 3 or 4 ounce portions so I have the rice available anytime I want to have a meal with rice-- gluten free canned chili, fresh cooked fajitas, stewed peppers, onions and tomatoes-- you get the picture. I live alone, but for larger quantities, just freeze the rice in bigger containers.

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  • About Me

    Connie Sarros travels the country speaking to celiac support groups.  She has a DVD “All You Wanted to Know About Gluten-free Cooking” and has written the following books:

    • Newly Diagnosed Survival Kit
    • Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook
    • Wheat-free Gluten-free Recipes for Special Diets
    • Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook
    • Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults
    • Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies

    Visit her website at:
    www.gfbooks.homestead.com

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  • Related Articles

    Hallie Davis
    Celiac.com 10/16/2008 - Having gone gluten-free I, like many of you,have been struggling with gluten-free baking challenges. I began withpancakes. My first pancakes, made with a popular mix, were not thelight, fluffy things that I remembered. My son compared them to hockeypucks. They got eaten, but were not a favorite. The next time I tried apopular author's gluten-free pancake recipe. These were a hit, and didnot have the sourness of the popular mix (which were bean-based)! Theauthor's recipe was also based on sorghum flour, so I have becomeconvinced that sorghum holds the greatest potential for gluten-freebaking. I also tried the author's recipe for bread, which is based onher same sorghum flour mix as her pancakes. The bread, however, was adisaster, and it collapsed as soon as it was taken from the pan. Ithink possibly that the problem was that by the time you take hersorghum flour mix, and add the additional potato starch called for inmaking the bread mix, you end up with a mix that is overwhelminglystarch rather than flour. There is actually very little sorghum flourin it by that point. I repeated these problems when trying to use yetanother popular sorghum-based gluten-free bread mix.
    Meanwhile,in my search for a good sorghum bread recipe I kept coming across ablurb by the Agricultural Research Service to the effect that they haddiscovered that sour dough fermentation improved the quality of sorghumbread. Well, I have never been fond of the sourness of sourdough bread,but I was interested to know that the ARS was trying to find goodrecipes for sorghum bread. Apparently they are convinced, as I am, thatit holds the highest promise for good gluten-free bread.
    Well,heck, the Agricultural Research Service was my old stomping ground! Fora couple summers during college I worked at the ARS in Beltsville,Maryland, and at least one of them was spent in the Human NuitritionResearch Division. I worked as a biochemical technician. While I wasworking with test tubes and distillation apparatus, the wonderfularomas from the nearby test kitchens would waft by me and I would envythe taste testers. I decided to contact those sorghum researchers whohave been involved in the search for a good gluten-free bread recipe. Iemailed them requesting to know if they had developed any goodnon-sourdough recipes, and I received the following replies (the replyfrom Tilman Schober was particularly valuable):



    Dear Hallie Davis,
    Thereare a couple of things which could help you to get the desiredgluten-free sorghum bread. Sourdough is not imperative, it justadditionally helps to stabilize the bread structure. But we know thatmany people object to the flavor. So, besides sourdough, the followingthings may help:
    1) Add the hydrocolloid HPMC (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose).It tremendously helps to get a good crumb. It is a food additive, andsome people object to it because they regard it as not natural.However, it is available in a food grade version designed for humanconsumption, and we simply know nothing that works better. Xanthan gum,probably the second best hydrocolloid, is much inferior in gluten-freebread making. There are various slightly different versions of HPMCcommercially available. As US government employees, we cannot endorse aspecific product. However, I would like to let you know that we hadgood success with Methocel K4M, food grade, which is available fromretailers like Ener-G Foods. The larger your bread pan the more likely the bread willcollapse. Try to use small pans, and just bake more loaves. This alsohelps to keep them fresh (just freeze the loaves which you do not eatfresh immediately after cooling). A good pan size might be e.g. 6inches by 2-3 inches and 2-3 inches high. Mix sorghum flour with starch. A recipe that has worked for usis described in the attached article (wHPMC, p. 5138). It is as follows: 105g water, 70 g sorghum flour, 30 g potato starch, 1.75 g salt, 1 gsugar, 2 g dry yeast, and 2 g HPMC. Highest accuracy in weighing theseingredients is not required, but I would prepare a larger amount ofdough (e.g. all ingredients multiplied by 10), so that it is easier toweigh. Mix all dry ingredients first in a large bowl (make sure thatthe HPMC is well mixed with the rest, it tends to form lumps withwater). Then add the water, mix (electric mixer) until a smooth batterresults, and pour (or spoon) the batter in the greased bread pans. Letthe dough rise for about 30-45 min (depends on temperature, observe howit increases in volume) and bake at 355 oF for about 30 min (depends onpan size, you will need to find out for your pan size and oven type).
    Another source for sorghum recipes you can find here:
    http://www.twinvalleymills.com/
    They sell a celiac disease with recipes (it is copyrighted, so I cannot send it to you).
    If you have success, we would love to hear about it. If you need further assistance, please let us know.
    Kind regards
    Tilman


    Tilmanthen wrote again, enclosing a copy of the referenced article, andasking that I cite it. The article was published in the "Journal ofAgricultural and Food Chemistry", 2007, 55, 5137-5146, and is entitled,"Gluten-Free Sorghum Bread Improved by Sourdough Fermentation:Biochemical, Rheological, and Microstructural Background." The Authorswere Tilman J. Schober, Scott R. Bean, and Daniel L. Boyle. They areworking in the Manhattan, Kansas Grain Marketing and ProductionResearch Center of the Agricultural Research Center. The otherperson who responded to my inquiry was Scott R. Bean. He sent me anearlier but related article, entitled, "Use of Sorghum Flour in BakeryProducts." This article was published in the "AIB InternationalTechnical Bulletin" in Volume XXVIII, issue 3, May/June 2006. Theauthors here were:

    T.J. Schober and S.R. Bean, USDA-ARS, GMPRC, Manhattan, KS 66502 E.K. Arendt, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland C. Fenster, Savory Palate Inc., Centennial, CO 80122
    This article had the formulas for two sorghum flour blends:Sorghum-Corn Flour Blend and Sorghum-Bean Flour Blend. Furtherreferences for the mixes and also a brownie recipe is given as:
    Fenster, C. 2004. Wheat-Free Recipes & Menus: Delicious, Healthful Eating for People with Food Sensitivities. New York: Avery (Penguin Group).
    Arecipe for Sorghum Waffles was also given with a citation, "Recipe byAmy Perry and Meredith Wiking, used with permission fromwww.twinvalleymills.com." So, the ARS, like me, is using recipesby popular authors and Twin Valley Mills as a starting point, and areexperimenting from there.I don't know about you, but I, forone, intend to get the Methocel K4M, food grade, and try using itinstead of guar gum or xanthan gum! I also plan to try the 70-30sorghum mix described today by Dr. Schober. I am TIRED of gummy bread,and collapses!


    Phyllis Morrow
    Celiac.com 11/17/2008 - One of the great pleasures of the holidays is having a wide assortment of goodies around to enjoy with family and friends. Don’t get left out of the fun just because you’re gluten-intolerant. Organize an old-fashioned cookie exchange with a gluten-free twist. Here’s how to do it...
     Pick a date and invite people to participate:

     The easy route: just get your family and friends together for the event at your house. Whether or not they are gluten-intolerant, these recipes will make everyone happy. They really won’t miss the gluten. Or, if you belong to a celiac support group, this is a natural activity to suggest.  Alternatively, you can do a more public event. There are probably more gluten-free people in your local area than you think there are. Put a notice in your local paper offering to organize and host a gluten-free cookie exchange and see how many responses you get. Your biggest problem may be limiting the numbers. Fifteen people is probably the upper limit for a civilized cookie exchange…unless you have some ambitious organizers to help you. If you do decide to take all comers,  try dividing the participants into smaller subgroups to exchange cookies among themselves. That could also allow people with other common sensitivities (e.g., dairy or nuts) to exchange recipes among themselves, with the appropriate common denominators. Arrange a venue – a local college culinary arts program kitchen, a community hall, the hall of a place of worship, or the home-base of a civic organization. It is often possible to find a space with a large kitchen at little or no expense for such purposes and it will give you a chance to demonstrate gluten-free cooking techniques and increase community awareness of gluten-intolerance. If there is a cost, you can ask participants to contribute (or look for community sponsorship).        
    Set and distribute the ground rules:
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    Have a party:
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    Have paper platters on hand or ask people to bring their own platters or tins to pack their shares home. You might want to pretty them up with ribbons or other decorations.
    Flours and flour mixes:
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    Gluten-free Flour Mixes called for in the following recipes:
    Multi-Blend Gluten-Free Flour (source: Celiac.com)

    2 ¼ cups finely ground brown rice flour (or mix white and brown rice flours, if preferred) ¼ cup potato starch flour (potato starch or potato starch flour is not to be confused with potato flour) 2/3 cup tapioca starch (also called tapioca flour) ¾ cup sweet rice flour (Mochiko brand can typically be found in Asian section of stores) 1/3 cup cornstarch 2 teaspoons xanthan gum (or guar gum)

    Featherlight Mix (source: Betty Hagman)
    1 cup each of rice flour, tapioca flour and cornstarch 1 tablespoon of potato flour (NOT potato starch)

     Simple Gluten-Free Flour Mix (aka Food Philosopher Brown Rice Flour Mix from Annalise Roberts;  Basic Gluten-free Mix from Rebecca Reilly)
    2 cups finely ground brown rice flour 2/3 cup potato starch 1/3 cup tapioca starch

     COOKIE RECIPES Hazelnut Cookies (16-18 cookies)
    1 ¾ cups hazelnut flour
    ¼ cup tapioca starch
    ¼ teaspoon xanthan gum
    ¼ teaspoon gluten-free baking powder
    1 stick unsalted butter
    1 cup sugar
    ¾ teaspoon gluten-free vanilla
    1 egg yolk
    Mix together the hazelnut flour, tapioca starch, xanthan gum, baking powder, and salt. Cream the butter until white. Add the sugar and beat until fluffy, abt. 5 min. Add the vanilla and egg yolk. Blend. Stir in the dry ingredients. Refrigerate at least 1 hour.
    Preheat oven to 350. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Lightly spray the paper with cooking spray.
    Make 1 ½ inch balls and place them on the cookie sheet, leaving 2 inches between. Bake 15-20 min. The bottoms will have a slight golden brown color. Cool slightly before transferring to a cooling rack
    VARIATIONS: Use pecan or almond flour in place of hazelnut.
     
    Walnut Orange Biscotti (makes abt 3 doz)
    1 ½ cups Basic Gluten-Free Mix
    ¼ cup sweet rice flour
    1 teaspoon xanthan gum
    ½ teaspoon baking soda
    ½ teaspoon gluten-free baking powder
    1/8 teaspoon salt
    1 stick unsalted butter, at room temperature
    1 cup sugar
    2 eggs
    2 teaspoons grated orange zest
    1 teaspoon gluten-free vanilla
    1 ½ cups chopped, lightly toasted walnuts
    Mix together gluten-free flour mix, sweet rice flour, xanthan gum, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.
    Cream butter until white. Add sugar and beat until fluffy, abt 5 min.
    Blend in the eggs, one at a time. Add orange zest and vanilla, then stir in the nuts. Slowly incorporate the dry ingredients to form a soft dough. Refrigerate the dough for at least 1 hour. The dough bakes better if refrigerated overnight.
    Preheat the oven to 375. Lightly grease 2 cookie sheets and line with parchment paper.
    Divide the dough into 3 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a log 1 ½ -2 inches thick. Place 2 logs on one cookie sheet, leaving enough space betweent hem for the dough to spread while baking. Place the third log on the other cookie sheet. Bake the logs for 20 mins.
    Remove the cookie sheet from the oven and let sit for 5-10 min. Slice the logs on a slight diagonal about ¾ inch thick. Place the slices, cut side down, on the cookie sheets. Lower the oven temperature to 350 and bake the slices for 10-12 min. Cool on a cooling rack. Store in an airtight container.
     
    Old-Fashioned Molasses Cookies (2 dozen)
    2 ½ cups Basic gluten-free Mix
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1 teaspoon ginger
    ½ teaspoon cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon xanthan gum
    ¼ teaspoon cloves
    1/8 teaspoon salt
    1 stick unsalted butter
    ½ cup packed brown sugar
    ½ cup molasses
    1 egg
    ½ cup buttermilk
    Mix together gluten-free mix, baking soda, ginger, cinnamon, xanthan gum, cloves, and salt. Cream the butter until white. Add sugar and beat until fluffy, abt. 5 min. Slowly pour in the molasses. Beat until creamy. Add the egg. Alternately add the buttermilk and dry ingredients in 3 additions. Refrigerate the dough for at least 1 hour.
    Preheat the oven to 350. Lightly grease a cookie sheet and line it with parchment paper.
    Using a medium or small ice cream scoop, place mounds of dough on the cookie sheet, leaving 2 inches between the mounds. Or roll the dough into 1 ½ in balls, place on the cookie sheet, and flatten slightly. Bake for 8-12 min, depending on the size. Let the cookies sit for 5 min on the coolie sheet before transferring to a cooling rack.
     
    Scottish Shortbread Cookies (2 dozen)
    2 cups brown rice flour
    ½ cup almond flour
    ¼ cup sweet rice flour
    ½ teaspoon xanthan gum
    1/8 teaspoon salt
    2 sticks unsalted butter, at room temperature
    ½ cup packed brown sugar
    1 teaspoon. gluten-free vanilla
    2 tablespoon heavy cream mixed with an egg yolk, for glazing cookies (optional)
    Preheat oven to 350. Lightly grease a cookie sheet and line it with parchment paper. Mix together the brown rice flour, almond flour, sweet rice flour, xanthan gum and salt.
    Cream the butter until white. Add sugar and beat until fluffy, about 5 min. Add the vanilla. Stir in the dry ingredients. Keep mixing until you have a soft cookie dough.
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    Chocolate-Chip Coconut Macaroons (3 dozen)
    ½ cup sugar
    2 extra large eggs
    1 ½ cup coconut flour (coconut powder)
    1 tablespoon melted butter or margarine
    1 teaspoon gluten-free vanilla
    3 oz. bittersweet chocolate, chopped
    Preheat oven to 325. Line a large cookie sheet with aluminum foil. In a medium bowl, beat the sugar and the eggs until pale and thick, at least 5 min. Fold in the coconut powder, melted butter, vanilla, and chocolate.
    Drop the dough by teaspoonfuls about 1 in apart onto the lined cookie sheet. Bake in the upper part of the preheated oven for 18 min. Transfer to a platter with a metal spatula.
     
    Nut-filled Dates (makes 25)
    2/3 cup ground, blanched almonds
    2 ½ teaspoon sugar
    Grated zest of 1 lemon
    1 tablespoon rum
    25 pitted dates
    5 oz. melted chocolate
    In a medium bowl, combine the almonds, sugar, lemon zest, and rum. Using a small spoon, fill each date with the nut mixture. Dip the end of each filled date in the melted chocolate and allow it to harden.
     
    Melting Moments
    ½ cup cornstarch
    ½ cup confectioners sugar
    ¾ cup softened unsalted butter
    Pinch of salt
    1 cup gluten-free flour mix
    Mix dry ingredients together into the softened butter to form a dough. Chill at least one hour.  Preheat oven to 375. Roll into ropes. Cut into small, uniform pieces (a bit smaller than a quarter).  Roll in sugar that has been placed on wax paper. Dip cookie press in sugar and before pressing each cookie (Tip: if cookie press sticks to the dough, oil it lightly with cooking spray). Bake on greased cookie sheets for 25 min.
     
    Gingerbread Cookies (makes a lot…)
    In a large bowl, beat together:
    ¾ cup butter
    ¾ cup sugar
    ¾ cup molasses
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1-2 tablespoons fresh, finely grated ginger (or 1 teaspoon ground ginger)
    ½ teaspoon cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon nutmeg
    Dissolve 2 teaspoons instant coffee in 2 tablespoons hot water (OR use 2 tablespoons very strong brewed coffee) and stir into sugar mixture.
    Gradually stir in 3 ¼ cups Multi-blend gluten-free flour mix.  Cover and chill until firm, at least 3 hours and up to 3 days.
    Use gluten-free flour mix or sweet rice flour to dust rolling surface. Roll to ¼ in thickness. Cut with cookie cutters, as desired. Use all your dough – just gather scraps together and roll them out again.
    Bake at 325 for 10-15 minutes. Cool briefly on pan, then transfer to wire racks. When completely cool, decorate as desired with confectioner’s icing and other gluten-free decorations, such as colored sugar crystals, candied fruit, etc.
     
    Pecan Butter Cookies (Mexican Wedding Cakes) – makes about 50
    1 cup unsalted butter
    6 tablespoons confectioners sugar
    2 teaspoons gluten-free vanilla
    2 cups Brown Rice Flour Mix
    1 teaspoon xanthan gum
    1 cup pecans, toasted (bake about 5 min in preheated 350F oven) and chopped
    Confectioners sugar
    Preheat oven to 350F. Position rack in center of oven. Lightly grease cookie sheet with baking spray. Beat butter and sugar in large bowl of electric mixer until light and creamy. Add vanilla and mix until smooth.
    Add flour mix and xanthan gum; beat until a smooth dough is formed. Mix in pecans.  Use your hands to shape dough into 1 inch balls. Roll balls in confectioners sugar and place on cookie sheets.
     Bake in center of oven for 12-15 min or until a very light golden color. Test for doneness. Bottom should be light golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack and cool. Store in an airtight container.
     
    Dutch Sugar Cookies (makes 3 doz, 2 ½ in cookies)
    2 ½ cups Featherlight Mix
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    2 ½ teaspoons xanthan gum
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup butter flavor Crisco
    1 egg
    2 teaspoons vanilla
    ¼ cup (or more) potato starch for kneading
    Preheat oven to 350F. Have on hand 2 un-greased cookie sheets. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour mix, baking powder, xanthan gum, and salt. Set aside.
    In the bowl of your mixer, cream the sugar and Crisco. Beat in the egg and vanilla. Add the dry ingredients, mixing enough to combine. The dough will be a soft ball. With your hands, knead in enough of the potato starch to make the dough easy to handle and roll out.
    Using about half at a time, place a piece of plastic wrap over the ball and roll out to about 1/8 in thickness. Cut into desired shapes and place on pan. Decorate with colored sugars before baking or use frosting to decorate after baking. (With this dough, you can use all the scraps. Just scrape them together and roll out again. They will not get tough)
    Bake for about 13 min. Cool very slightly before removing from pan.
     
    Almond-Pignoli Cookies 
    12 ounces (Solo canned) almond paste
    ½ cup white sugar
    1 cup confectioners' sugar
    4 egg whites
    1 ½ cups pine nuts
    Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Line 2 cookie sheets with foil; lightly grease foil.
    Mix almond paste and granulated sugar in food processor until smooth. Add confectioners' sugar and 2 egg whites; process until smooth. The dough will be easier to handle if you chill it before proceeding to the next step
    Whisk remaining 2 egg whites in small bowl. Place pine nuts on shallow plate. With lightly floured hands roll dough into 1 inch balls. Coat balls in egg whites, shaking off excess, then roll in pine nuts, pressing lightly to stick. Arrange balls on cookie sheets, and flatten slightly to form a 1 1/2 inch round.
    Bake 15 to 18 minutes in the preheated oven, or until lightly browned. Let stand on cookie sheet 1 minute. Transfer to wire rack to cool.

    Gluten-Free Recipe Sources:

    allrecipes.com (Pignoli Cookies I, reproduced above as Almond-Pignoli Cookies) Hagman, Bette The Gluten-free Gourmet Makes Dessert (Henry Holt, 2002) Dutch Sugar Cookies, p. 175 Reilly, Rebecca, Gluten-Free Baking (Simon & Schuster, 2002) Walnut-Orange Biscotti, p. 83; Hazelnut Cookies, p. 78; Old-Fashioned Molasses Cookies, p. 70; Scottish Shortbread Cookies, p. 75 Roberts, Annalise G., Gluten-Free Baking Classics (Surrey Books, 2006) Pecan Butter Cookies (aka Mexican Wedding Cakes), p.101 Mauksch, Mary Wachtel Fabulous and Flourless: 150 Wheatless and Dairy-free Desserts  (MacMillan, 1997) Chocolate Chip Macaroons, p. 139; Nut-filled Dates, p.159 Morrow, Phyllis (old favorites made gluten-free): Gingerbread Men (or Women, or Children, or Bears….) Melting Moments (adapted from the recipe of a dear Danish friend, Clara Foged, who called them “melting moomins”)


    Jules Shepard
    This recipe may be prepared using a mixer and oven or in a bread machine. This loaf is light and airy, yet substantial enough to use as sandwich bread (however, if you want a denser loaf, simply add 1/4 cup dry milk powder to the dry ingredients).
    The recipe boasts the addition of flax seed meal and flax seeds which contribute a large amount of dietary fiber and other beneficial nutritional properties like high omega 3.  The simple addition of two tablespoons of flax seed meal to this bread also adds four grams of dietary fiber and three grams of protein.  As an alternative, you can simply use 2 eggs in place of the flax seed and water mixture, and you will add the dry yeast to the dough at the final mixing step.
    When using a bread machine, always be sure to add all liquid ingredients to the pan first, followed by the dry ingredients. I recommend sifting all dry ingredients (except yeast) together in a bowl first, then pouring it into the bread machine pan. If the dough seems too thick, gradually add more yogurt, one quarter cup at a time, until the dough is still thick, but able to be smoothed with a spatula. Be sure to check the bread with a spatula throughout the mixing process to ensure that all the dry ingredients have been incorporated. Smooth the top with a rubber spatula and when done mixing, sprinkle any desired toppings on top of the loaf. Select either the gluten-free bread setting on your machine, or the quickest bake setting like a light crust 1 ½ pound loaf. Remove the pan from the machine when finished baking (internal temperature should be between 205-210F).
    When making with a mixer and oven, follow the specific directions outlined below.

    Ingredients:
    2 Tablespoons ground flax seeds or flax seed meal
    ½ cup very hot water
    1 tsp. granulated cane sugar
    1 Tablespoon rapid rise or bread machine yeast
    ¼ cup Earth Balance Shortening, cut into small pieces (or canola oil, if using a bread machine)
    3 ¼ cups Jules Gluten FreeTM All Purpose Flour *
    ½ teaspoon baking soda
    2 teaspoons gluten-free baking powder
    Pinch of salt
    2 Tablespoons honey
    1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
    1 ½ cup vanilla yogurt (dairy or soy)
    1 Tablespoon flax seeds
    Toppings of choice (coarse sea salt, sesame seeds, flax seeds, etc.)

    (* I cannot predict how this recipe will work with any other flour mixture but my own.  The mix recipe may be found in media links on my website and in my book, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating, or pre-mixed from my website.)Directions:
    In a small bowl, add the hot water and flax seed meal and stir. Let sit for 5 minutes. Add the yeast and one teaspoon of sugar to this mixture and stir. Set aside for 5 more minutes for it to begin to bubble and grow; if the mixture does not bubble or grow, throw it out and re-mix with fresh yeast. Sift remaining dry ingredients together in a large bowl. Cut in the pieces of shortening using a pastry cutter or the dough paddle on your mixer. Add the remaining liquid ingredients next, mixing well. Finally, mix in the yeast/flax seed meal mixture and stir well using the dough paddle. If the dough seems too thick to form a loaf, gradually mix in more yogurt, one quarter cup at a time, until the dough is still thick, but able to be smoothed with a spatula.

    Scoop the dough into a greased bread pan (use a dark metal pan if you like a darker crust on your bread; lighter, shiny metal or glass if you like a light crust). Smooth the top, sprinkle with any toppings, then cover with a sheet of wax paper sprayed with cooking oil. Sit the covered dough for 30 minutes in a warm place like an oven warming drawer or even in your oven with the light on.
    Remove the raised dough to a preheated convection oven set to 275 F or a preheated static oven set to 300 F. Cook for approximately 60 minutes, or until the crust is browning nicely and a cake tester or skewer inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean (internal temperature should be 205-210F). Remove to a cooling rack and rotate gently from side to side every 5 minutes or so if it looks like your loaf wants to sink at all in the middle. When cooled for 15 minutes or more, remove from the loaf pan to finish cooling before slicing.

    Jules Shepard
    Ingredients:
    ½ cup granulated cane sugar
    ½ cup butter or Earth Balance Buttery Sticks (dairy-free & vegan) or Earth Balance Buttery Spread (dairy-free and soy-free & vegan) at room temperature
    ½ cup vanilla yogurt (dairy or soy, coconut or rice)
    1 cup unsweetened applesauce
    2 large eggs (or egg substitute (Ener-G) works great)
    2 cups Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour*
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    2 teaspoons gluten-free baking powder
    2 tablespoons (heaping) flax seed meal
    ¼ cup certified gluten-free oats
    1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon. nutmeg
    ½ cup baking raisins
    cinnamon-sugar mixture for the tops
    extra oats for the tops
    *(The recipe for my homemade all purpose gluten-free flour blend is in my books, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating, and The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten-Free.  You may also find it on my Web site)
    Directions:
    Preheat the oven to 350 F (static) 325 F (convection)
    Oil or line muffin cups and set aside (makes approximately 15 regular sized muffins or 48 mini-muffins)
    Combine the sugar and butter in a large mixing bowl, beating until fluffy. Add in the eggs or egg substitute, applesauce and yogurt, and mix well.
    In a separate bowl, whisk together all the dry ingredients. Gradually add them into the wet ingredients and beat until incorporated. Stir in the raisins last.
    Fill muffin cups to 2/3 full and then sprinkle cinnamon-sugar and additional oats on top.
    Bake for approximately 20 minutes for mini-muffins, 25-30 minutes for regular sized muffins. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely...Enjoy!


  • Recent Articles

    Roxanne Bracknell
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
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    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com