• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,619
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Smadartad
    Newest Member
    Smadartad
    Joined
  • 0

    Homemade Granola Bars (Gluten-Free)


    Jules Shepard

    I'm always looking for quick, healthy snacks and breakfasts that I can eat and run, chasing after two small kids as I do each morning! Granola bars seem like the perfect solution, but are off-limits for the gluten-free set. Most contain forbidden grains, or at least oats which are not certified gluten-free.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    I decided to be deprived no longer and invented my own, packed with deliciousness and nutrition in every gluten-free bite! These are great bars for everyone, as they are easily modifiable to fit nearly any diet. In addition to being gluten-free, they are also egg and dairy-free and vegan. I've even offered alternatives below for low-glycemic, oat-free and nut-free diets. Feel free to substitute what you have on hand and to your tastes. Adding more dried fruits will increase the sugars, so if you are watching your sugar intake, simply reduce the fruit content and be sure not to use any dried fruits with added sugars, like cranberries.

    I like to make my own dried fruit using a dehydrator on loan from a friend, but you can find many dried fruits (often already chopped – bonus!) in your local organic market or grocery store. Check ingredient labels to be sure there are not any added glutens, as some manufacturers will roll dried fruits in wheat flour to keep them from sticking together.

    Enjoy this healthy treat!

    Gluten-Free Granola Bars

    Gluten-Free Granola Bar

    Ingredients:
    3 cups gluten-free rolled oats or rice flakes (Shiloh Farms)
    1 cup Jules' Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour* or certified gluten-free oat flour
    ¼ cup flax seeds (pulverized) or flax seed meal
    1 tablespoon. cinnamon
    ½ cup chopped dried apples
    ½ cup chopped dried bananas
    ¼ cup chopped dates
    3/4 cup raisins, boiled (see directions below)
    1 cup chopped walnuts (optional)
    ½ cup chopped figs
    ½ cup agave nectar, honey or maple syrup
    ¼ cup sunflower nut butter or “natural” peanut, almond or cashew butter
    1 cup unsweetened applesauce
    ¾ cup unsweetened apple juice or cider

    *My all purpose flour may be made athome according to directions found in my books, Nearly NormalCooking for Gluten-Free Eating and The First Year: CeliacDisease and Living Gluten-Free, as well as in various media linkson my website. It may also be purchased pre-mixed from my website.

    Directions:

    Preheat oven to 375 F.

    Line a jelly roll baking pan withaluminum foil (preferably the “release” kind)

    Blend the flax seeds (if using seedsinstead of flax seed meal) in a food processor or blender until fine.

    In a large mixing bowl, stir togetherthis flax seed meal, the 1 cup Jules' Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour,the 3 cups of oats, cinnamon, and fruits and nuts of your choice (insimilar proportions to those listed above). When fully combined,stir in the agave nectar, applesauce, nut butter and juice, mixingwith a large wooden spoon until totally incorporated. The mixtureshould be wet enough to press together for baking.

    Pack the mixture into the bottom of theprepared baking pan and press down with the back of a rubber spatulaor large wooden spoon. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the edges beginto brown slightly.

    Remove from oven and cut into barsbefore cooled. Once fully cooled, remove from pan by lifting thefoil edges out and gently removing all the bars while still on top ofthe foil.

    Makes approximately 21 bars, but theywon't last long! My kids even liked these healthy snacks!

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    Atop each of Jules Shepard’s free weekly recipe newsletters is her mantra: “Perfecting Gluten-Free Baking, Together.” From her easy-to-read cookbook (“Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten Free Eating”) to her highly rated reference for making the transition to living gluten free easier (“The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten Free”), Jules is tireless in the kitchen, at the keyboard and in person in helping people eating gluten free do it with ease, with style and with no compromises.
     
    In the kitchen, she creates recipes for beautiful, tasty gluten-free foods that most people could never tell are gluten free. As a writer, she produces a steady stream of baking tips, living advice, encouragement and insights through magazine articles, her web site (gfJules.com), newsletter, e-books and on sites like celiac.com and others. Jules also maintains a busy schedule of speaking at celiac and gluten-free gatherings, appearing on TV and radio shows, baking industry conventions, as well as teaching classes on the ease and freedom of baking at home.
     
    Her patent-pending all-purpose flour literally has changed lives for families who thought going gluten free meant going without. Thousands read her weekly newsletter, follow her on Twitter and interact with her on FaceBook.  

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   18 Members, 1 Anonymous, 478 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Gluten-Free Flours
    Celiac.com 01/11/2005 - Gluten-free flours are generally used in combination with one another. There is not one stand alone gluten-free flour that you can use successfully in baked goods. Be sure to know the procedures your flour manufacturers use, cross contamination at the factory can cause diet compliance issues for the gluten intolerant.
    Arrowroot Flour can be used cup for cup in place of cornstarch if you are allergic to corn.
    Bean Flour is a light flour made from garbanzo and broad beans. To cut the bitter taste of beans, replace white sugar with brown or maple sugar in the recipe(or replace some of the bean flour with sorghum).
    Brown Rice Flour is milled from unpolished brown rice and has a higher nutrient value than white rice flour. Since this flour contains bran it has a shorter shelf life and should be refrigerated. As with white rice flour, it is best to combine brown rice flour with several other flours to avoid the grainy texture. Ener-G Foods and Bobs Red Mill produce a finer, lighter brown rice flour that works well with dense cakes such as pound cake.
    Cornstarch is similar in usage to sweet rice flour for thickening sauces. Best when used in combination with other flours.
    Guar Gum, a binding agent, can be used in place of xanthan gum for corn sensitive individuals. Use half as much guar gum to replace xanthan gum. Guar gum contains fiber and can irritate very sensitive intestines.
    Nut Flours are high in protein and, used in small portions, enhances the taste of homemade pasta, puddings, pizza crust, bread, and cookies. Finely ground nut meal added to a recipe also increases the protein content and allows for a better rise. Ground almond meal can replace dry milk powder in most recipes as a dairy-free alternative.
    Potato Flour has a strong potato taste and is rarely used in gluten-free cooking.
    Potato Starch Flour is used in combination with other flours, rarely used by itself.
    Sorghum Flour a relatively new flour that cuts the bitterness of bean flour and is excellent in bean flour mixes.
    Soy Flour is high in protein and fat with a nutty flavor. Best when used in small quantities in combination with other flours. Soy flour has a short shelf life.
    Sweet Rice Flour is made from glutinous rice (it does not contain the gluten fraction that is prohibited to the gluten intolerant). Often used as a thickening agent. Sweet rice flour is becoming more common in gluten-free baking for tender pies and cakes. It has the ability to smooth the gritty taste (that is common in gluten-free baked goods) when combined with other flours, see Multi Blend recipe.
    Tapicoa Starch Flour is a light, velvety flour from the cassava root. It lightens gluten-free baked goods and gives them a texture more like that of wheat flour baked goods. It is especially good in pizza crusts where it is used in equal parts with either white rice flour or brown rice flour.
    White Rice Flour is milled from polished white rice, best to combine with several other flours to avoid the grainy texture rice flour alone imparts. Try to buy the finest texture of white rice flour possible.
    Xanthan Gum is our substitute for gluten, it holds things together. See usage information on Multi Blend recipe page. Xanthan gum is derived from bacteria in corn sugar, the corn sensitive person should use guar gum (using half as much guar gum to replace xanthan gum).
    Alternative Flours
    The national patient support groups agree that the following flours are fine for the gluten intolerant providing you can find a pure source (grown in dedicated fields and processed on dedicated equipment). These flours greatly improve the taste of gluten-free baked goods. To incorporate into your favorite recipe, replace up to 50% of the flour in a recipe with an alternative flour and use the Multi Blend mix for the balance. Pizza crust and bread proportions dont follow this rule.
    Amaranth a whole grain from the time of the Aztecs- it is high in protein and contains more calcium, fiber, magnesium, Vitamin A and Vitamin C than most grains. Amaranth has a flavor similar to graham crackers without the sweetness.
    Buckwheat is the seed of a plant related to rhubarb, it is high in fiber, protein, magnesium and B vitamins. Dark buckwheat flour turns baked goods purple, I only use light buckwheat flour.
    Millet a small, round grain that is a major food source in Asia, North Africa and India.
    I havent used millet and dont know much about the grain.
    Quinoa (keen-wah) A staple food of the Incas. Quinoa is a complete protein with all 8 amino acids, quinoa contains a fair amount of calcium and iron.
    Teff an ancient grain from Ethiopia, now grown in Idaho. Teff is always a whole grain flour since it is difficult to sift or separate. High in protein, B vitamins, calcium, and iron.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/18/2013 - It's Thanksgiving time once again, and celiac.com is here with gluten-free information, tips and recipes to help you make the most of your gluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday celebrations!
    These helpful tips will help to make a great gluten-free turkey dinner at home:
    First, always make sure you buy a 100% gluten-free turkey for your holiday dinner. Don't assume your turkey is gluten-free. Numerous brands use gluten when processing their turkeys, so be sure to read the label, and to make sure there is no hidden gluten in any of the ingredients. Check our extensive list of safe gluten-free foods and ingredients, along with gluten-free shopping guides to make gluten-free shopping easier. Brining is a great way to prepare your gluten-free turkey that will leave your guests quizzing you about your secrets to such a moist, savory bird. For those of you who plan a smaller Thanksgiving, consider this recipe for stuffed Cornish Game Hens. Remember, you can also brine the game hens for a extra-moist, flavorful birds. Next, make sure to prepare a gluten-free stuffing! Don't risk cross-contamination by putting gluten-based bread or stuffing ingredients in your turkey. Gluten-free stuffing is a holiday staple that keeps them coming back for more. Be sure to check out Celiac.com's recipe for our tried and true gluten-free holiday stuffing that will keep your guests happily coming back for seconds. You can find some alternative stuffing recipes on celiac.com's forum. Be sure to prepare gluten-free gravy. If you don't want to prepare your own, be sure to use a gluten-free gravy mix. Thicken homemade gravy with either corn starch, tapioca or arrowroot flour. Be careful: Bouillon cubes often contain wheat or gluten, so make sure to use only gluten-free bouillon cubes. Vegetarian boullion is also an option. Lastly, ordering gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items, like prepared gluten-free pies, ahead of time will help you to spend less time cooking and more time with friends and family. Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can be ordered online and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall. Your purchases there will directly support the celiac awareness and support mission of Celiac.com. Here's a recipe for a delicious variation on traditional mashed potatoes:
    Perfect Harvest Mashed Potatoes
    These harvest mashed potatoes are a nice alternative or supplement to traditional mashed potatoes.
    They go great with gluten-free stuffing and gravy, or with a splash of butter.
    Ingredients:
    1 pound Yukon gold potatoes 1 pound large red potatoes 1½ pounds sweet potatoes ¼ cup butter ½ cup buttermilk ¼ cup Greek yogurt ¼ cup freshly grated Romano cheese 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon Directions:
    Boil water with a dash of salt in a large pot.
    Rinse and peel all potatoes, and cut into 1-inch pieces.
    Place peeled potatoes in boiling salted water, cover and cook 15 to 20 minutes or until tender.
    Drain and place in a large bowl.
    Add ¼ cup butter and add the rest of the ingredients ingredients; mash with a potato masher until smooth.
    Top with additional butter, if desired.
    **
    For a sure-fire dessert hit, serve up some Classic Gluten-free Holiday Pumpkin Pie.
    Round out your gluten-free dinner with gluten-free side dishes from Celiac.com's extensive listing of gluten-free recipes. Meanwhile, be sure to check out these other gluten-free Thanksgiving recipes that will help make your holiday dinner a success:
    Fast Nutty Apple Crumble Holiday Pumpkin Bread (Gluten-Free) Gingerbread #2 (Gluten-Free) Molasses Spice Cookies (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies (Gluten-Free) Soft Sugar Cookies (Gluten-Free) Frosted Pumpkin Bars (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Cheesecake with Butter Pecan Crust (Gluten-Free) In addition to our recipes for Classic Gluten-free Pumpkin Pie, and gluten-free Ginger Crust Pumpkin Pie, we offer recipes for Gluten-free Apple Pie and 20 Recipes for Festive Gluten-free Holiday Treats.

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 10/30/2014 - I have always been a fan of Steve Rice and his Authentic Foods line of gluten-free products. Recently I had the opportunity to try out his new Steve's Gluten-Free Bread Flour Blend, and I must say that I'm very excited about this amazing new flour blend, and the many possibilities that if offers.
    When Steve told me that he had been working for 20 years to perfect this mix, I knew that I was in for something very special, and my experiences with it were amazing.
    In the past I have tried many products billed as all purpose gluten-free flour mixes, but none are quite like this one. The directions are straightforward, and I only needed my own yeast packet, sugar, egg, butter and oil to make the mix.

    I new something magical was happening at the point where you first begin to mix everything together...see below:

    I know that Steve recommends using a mixer, but I don't have one. However, after mixing and kneading it for only a few minutes by hand it came together with the look and feel of a real gluten bread dough...it was very easy to work with, and in a very short time it looked like this:

    I used the dough to make the outstanding pizza below, which had a spongy, delicate crust. When making it I found that I could easily pick up the dough and work with it to form the gluten-free pizza crust.

    My wife used the remaining dough to make a cake, which came out light and fluffy, and it held together extremely well:

    Be sure to give this great new product a try. I'm sure that you too will be blown away by how great it is, and how many things you will be able to make with it using Steve's many recipes offered on his Web site.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.