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    No Milk? No Gluten? No Problem!


    Connie Sarros

    This article originally appeared in the Winter 2003 edition of Celiac.com's JournalofGluten-Sensitivity.


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    Celiac.com 01/27/2012 - Wheat is the most popular grain in the United States and is found in a multitude of products.  We are taught from young that milk helps our bones grow strong.  So what do people do who cannot safely consume these products?  They eat very well!

    Connie Sarros“No Gluten” means avoiding all wheat, rye, barley, malt, kamut, spelt, triticale, graham flour, and contaminated oats.  But that won’t stop anyone who loves chocolate chip cookies from finding an alternative way to make them!  On a gluten-free diet, combinations of substitute flours are used (see Table 1).

    Once you have the magic combination of gluten-free flours, add a little more flavoring, a little more leavening, and voila!  You have wonderful chocolate chip cookies!
    But how do you make those cookies if you are also allergic to dairy products?  Do not despair.  There are viable alternatives to all ingredients.  Allergies to dairy products may be a reaction to the lactose in dairy products (the natural sugar in milk), to casein (milk protein), or to both.

    Lactose is often used in breads, cakes, cereals, cooking mixes, prepared meats and fish, and in soups.  Tuna fish often contains sulfites and has lactose in the broth.  It is even found in some medications.  Read labels constantly for hidden lactose.  Some lactose-sensitive people may tolerate un-pasteurized yogurt because yogurt cultures produce the enzyme lactase, which breaks down lactose into a simpler, more readily-digestible form.  This also applies to buttermilk and some cheeses.

    Casein is the protein found in milk.  Fortunately, cow’s milk is one of the easier ingredients to substitute in cooking; use equal amounts of soy milk, rice milk, coconut milk, water, or fruit juices.  Read labels—beware of products labeled “Dairy Free”, like Cool Whip, which often contain casein (milk protein).  Some non-dairy cheese substitutes made from soybeans and almonds may still contain casein to give them a more authentic texture.  Casein is also used as a binder in products like hot dogs, pepperoni, salami and sausage.  Milk protein increases production of mucus-aggravating conditions, such as asthma, bronchitis and sinusitis.  It acts as an irritant to our immune systems, contributing to allergies and autoimmune diseases. 

    Let’s get back to our chocolate chip cookies.  What do we use instead of the butter and milk?  Here are some substitutions that I often use:

    • Applesauce (may replace up to ¾ of the butter in a recipe.)
    • Coconut Butter (Use ¾ cup coconut butter for each 1 cup of butter called for in a recipe.)
    • Coconut Milk
    • Lactaid Milk (The lactase enzyme has been added to milk to convert 99% of the lactose into an easily-digestible sugar.  While many lactose-intolerant people are able to safely consume this milk, it contains casein and is not suitable for those on a casein-free diet.)
    • Milk-free Margarine (Fleischmann’s makes a milk-free, gluten-free margarine.  Milk-free margarine may burn if heated too high over direct heat.)
    • Non-Dairy Yogurt
    • Nut Butter
    • Oil (Use ¾ cup corn, vegetable or olive oil for each cup of butter called for in a recipe.)
    • Rice Milk
    • Soymilk (Each brand of soymilk reacts differently.  Some will give an un-wanted color to your dish; others cannot be heated to a high temperature.  When substituting soymilk for cream, add a little vegetable oil to achieve the right consistency.  Read labels carefully, as some commercial soymilk products are not gluten-free.)
    • Vegetable Shortening
    When in doubt about the diary-free status of a product, the Kosher symbols found on some packages may also be used as a guide:
    • UD:  Contains diary
    • KD:  The product has milk protein.
    • DE:  The product was produced on equipment shared with dairy products.
    • Pareve  (or Parve):  The product is “neutral”, which means no animal ingredients.  The majority of Parve products are dairy-free.  However, Jewish law states that if the product has less than 1/5% dairy by volume, they may take special measures to allow for the product to be labeled Pareve.
    Now we just have to search for safe chocolate chips for our cookies.  Many of the darker chocolates do not contain diary or gluten, for example, “Now” brand carob chips contain no dairy or gluten.

    Eureka!  You have successfully converted your chocolate chip recipe!  Eat and enjoy!  The important thing to remember is that there are always good, viable substitutions available.  The more diet restrictions you have, the more innovative you have to be with your cooking.  There is almost nothing you cannot eat—you just have to learn to make it a little differently—enjoy!

    Table 1

    • Almond flour
    • Amaranth flour
    • Brown rice flour
    • Buckwheat flour
    • Chestnut flour
    • Corn flour
    • Fava bean flour
    • Flax Seed Flour
    • Garbanzo bean flour (Chickpea flour)
    • Lentil flour
    • Mung bean flour
    • Pea flour
    • Potato flour
    • Potato starch flour
    • Pure Cornmeal
    • Sorghum flour
    • Sweet potato flour
    • Sweet rice flour
    • Tapioca flour
    • White bean flour
    • White rice flour

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    Thank you for the information, especially the Kosher symbols. I also am glad to see the butter and oil substitutes which will be very helpful. I'm been using flax meal for egg substitution which works well for me.

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    Guest Dolores Eilers

    Posted

    It is a big help because I love chocolate chip cookies and have trouble finding chips to use safely.

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    Guest StellaB

    Posted

    This is a wonderful set of ideas--I made these cookies and they came out perfectly! I've nominated this recipe for an award at Top Ten Recipes Contest.

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    Thank you for the wonderful information, I am caring for someone who is not allowed dairy or gluten in their diet and this will help immensely as it's not easy trying to find alternate ingredients for so many recipes I would like to make.

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  • About Me

    Connie Sarros travels the country speaking to celiac support groups.  She has a DVD “All You Wanted to Know About Gluten-free Cooking” and has written the following books:

    • Newly Diagnosed Survival Kit
    • Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook
    • Wheat-free Gluten-free Recipes for Special Diets
    • Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook
    • Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults
    • Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies

    Visit her website at:
    www.gfbooks.homestead.com

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    Jules Shepard
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    Sweet Potato Bundt Cake

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    Honey-Orange Glaze:
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    The finished Sweet Potato Bundt Cake (Gluten-Free)



    Connie Sarros
    This article originally appeared in the Spring 2003 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
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    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au