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    Pumpkin-Zucchini Bars (Gluten-Free)


    Jules Shepard

    This recipe calls for my NearlyNormal All Purpose Flour.  You can find the recipe for this flour in mycookbook, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating or in various media links on my website, where you can also by this mix ready-made. It produces amazing results in all your gluten-free baking.


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    Ingredients:
    1/3 cup butter or non-dairy alternative such as Earth Balance Shortening Sticks
    ¾ cup granulated cane sugar
    ½ cup light brown sugar
    2 eggs
    ¼ cup hot water
    2 tablespoons flax seed meal
    1 can pumpkin purée (15 oz)
    1 cup shredded zucchini
    2 cups Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour
    1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice
    1 tablespoon gluten-free baking powder
    1 teaspoon baking soda

    Topping (optional):
    ½ cup softened cream cheese or Tofutti Better Than Cream Cheese (non-dairy)
    ¼ cup granulated cane sugar

    Directions:
    Preheatoven to 350 F static or 325 F convection.

    Oila jelly-roll pan, or cookie sheet with sides, approximately 15-10inches.

    Ina small bowl, combine the hot water with ONE tablespoon of theflax seed meal. Set aside.

    Ifmaking the topping, combine the cream cheese and sugar in a smallbowl, stirring until well-mixed. Set aside.

    Ina medium-sized bowl, mix together the Nearly Normal All PurposeFlour, spice, baking powder, baking soda and ONE tablespoon of theflax seed meal.

    Ina large mixing bowl, beat the butter and sugars until a crumbly mealis formed. Add in the eggs, pumpkin and zucchini and beat untilwell-mixed. Stir in the flax seed-water mixture.

    Graduallybeat the dry ingredients into the large mixing bowl, incorporatingall the ingredients until thoroughly combined. Spread into theprepared pan and top with the topping, if desired, by spooningdollops onto the top of the batter, then cutting through them up andback the length of the pan with a butter knife to cut the toppinginto the bars.

    Bakein the preheated oven for approximately 20-25 minutes, or until thebars are pulling away from the sides of the pan and they spring backwhen lightly touched.

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  • About Me

    Atop each of Jules Shepard’s free weekly recipe newsletters is her mantra: “Perfecting Gluten-Free Baking, Together.” From her easy-to-read cookbook (“Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten Free Eating”) to her highly rated reference for making the transition to living gluten free easier (“The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten Free”), Jules is tireless in the kitchen, at the keyboard and in person in helping people eating gluten free do it with ease, with style and with no compromises.
     
    In the kitchen, she creates recipes for beautiful, tasty gluten-free foods that most people could never tell are gluten free. As a writer, she produces a steady stream of baking tips, living advice, encouragement and insights through magazine articles, her web site (gfJules.com), newsletter, e-books and on sites like celiac.com and others. Jules also maintains a busy schedule of speaking at celiac and gluten-free gatherings, appearing on TV and radio shows, baking industry conventions, as well as teaching classes on the ease and freedom of baking at home.
     
    Her patent-pending all-purpose flour literally has changed lives for families who thought going gluten free meant going without. Thousands read her weekly newsletter, follow her on Twitter and interact with her on FaceBook.  

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    Ok, I know these cookies aren't free from peanuts, but they are peanut butter cookies, after all!  If you can do almonds, but not peanuts, definitely try this recipe with almond butter – yum!
    For the rest of us with other dietary restrictions, take heart! These cookies fit the bill! They're delicious, and still gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, soy-free, and sugar-free! Yes, they even have a low glycemic index! Enjoy these cookies on their own, or add chocolate chips (dairy-free chips are great too!) for a change of pace. High protein, loads of vitamins and minerals, dietary fiber – it's all there, and in a cookie!!!  Maybe I should have called these “Guilt-Free Cookies”!!!
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    Bake for 10-12 minutes and remove to cool on the pan.

    Finished "Free-From" Peanut Butter Cookies
     

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    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.