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    Will New Gluten-free Cassava Flour Rock Your Baking World?


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 11/01/2010 - American Key Food Products (AKFP) has announced a patent application for the production process for a gluten-free cassava flour. The company also announced that it has begun initial production of this new gluten-free flour at its manufacturing facility in Brazil.


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    Gluten is the protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten provides the structural elasticity in kneaded dough products, permits leavening, and supports the crumb structure and chewy texture of traditional baked goods.

    In the last few years, a number of manufacturers have produced gluten-free flour and starch products for gluten-free baking. However, creating baked goods without gluten is challenging, and the resulting baked goods can often be dry, crumbly, or gummy products.

    Cassava, or tapioca flour, has been one of the more promising ingredients for gluten-free baking. However, most traditional cassava flours have a coarse texture, similar to corn meal.

    According to AKFP technical sales director Carter Foss,  the company has spent more than a year developing the flour to have baking characteristics that closely mimic wheat flour in structure, texture and taste.

    The result of the AKFP process, which uses the complete root, is a fine, soft flour that contains both protein and fiber. The patent application covers various aspects of the manufacturing process, including particular milling and drying procedures, as well as the resulting flour itself.

    “During the processing of it, we have to get the physical characteristics made correctly or the flour fails. It over-bakes and turns to dust,” Foss said.

    Foss says that AKFP cassava flour can replace combinations of flours, starches and hydrocolloids in gluten-free baked goods, allowing for a simpler ingredient statement.

    After the pilot runs are completed at its new Brazilian facility, AKFP intends to have continuous production on line by the beginning of 2011.

    Source:


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    Guest Diane Lilly

    Posted

    Thank you for the article on the new flour. I can't wait to try baking with it. It is fun to try new products and hopefully I will get great bakery items at home.

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    I was diagnosed with celiac in 1961. Back then there wasn't very much in the gluten free world. I'm so excited about the new advances they are making. It is becoming much easier to stay gluten free. I just know someone will come up with a flour that behaves every bit as good as glutenous flours, hopefully this will be it.

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    Guest irene spezialetti

    Posted

    Well written..clean, to the point .

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    Guest Francine

    Posted

    Yes, but doesn't cassava mess with your thyroid if you consume too much? I read it in a book on the thyroid gland. You have to be careful - too much of anything isn't good. Let food be your medicine...

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    Guest Linda

    Posted

    Yes, but doesn't cassava mess with your thyroid if you consume too much? I read it in a book on the thyroid gland. You have to be careful - too much of anything isn't good. Let food be your medicine...

    Cassava in large quantities can effect thyroid function of severely iodine-deficient populations. Cassava is often consumed as the main calorie source by populations suffering from malnutrition. A few cakes eaten in our abundant food nation shouldn't harm most people.

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    Guest Velma

    Posted

    This is exciting news. I can't wait to bake with it.

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    Guest JJ Blanton

    Posted

    Here it is almost 2014 and I have just found this informative article. Recently, I found XO Baking Co.'s cookie mix and enjoyed delicious just-baked cookies for the first time in going on two decades. Cassava is here and it is terrific! My diet is extremely limited, so I'll be looking for the flour itself to make something besides treats, but thank goodness for progress!

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    I have also just discovered the XO Baking Company products...so far I've tried sugar cookies, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, banana bread, pumpkin bread, and there are other mixes as well that I haven't yet tried. The ingredients in all of them seem to be a base of cassava and coconut flour. Everything I've tried has been phenomenal and tastes exactly like the "real" gluten product equivalent, and no one who didn't know these are from gluten free mixes would ever suspect these products are not made with wheat. The bread textures are fluffy and perfect. The usual gluten-free mixes (rice flours and tons of starches) really upset my digestive system, and I've never been sure if it was the vast combination of components, or the rice flour, or what it was. So far, I have done well with all of the cassava flour mixes, no upsets whatsoever. This company also makes a cassava flour mix which I haven't yet found. However, I suspect it will be more cost effective than mixes because you do have to add a lot of your own ingredients to the mixes (which are expensive), so I suspect you could make your own recipes from scratch and just add the cassava flour and it would possibly be more cost effective. In any case, cassava flour (or the cassava-coconut flour combo) is absolutely amazing for celiacs, and I haven't had anything this delicious for decades.

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    And what about the cyanide potential from Cassava? What is the residual amount left from processing? Independent lab results? Please be sure to include the cons of things when you write about the pros, otherwise it just looks like an advertisement. Thank you!

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    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Jules Shepard
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    Jules Shepard
    Ok, I know these cookies aren't free from peanuts, but they are peanut butter cookies, after all!  If you can do almonds, but not peanuts, definitely try this recipe with almond butter – yum!
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/24/2012 - Like many people, I associate the holidays with delicious desserts and yummy baked goods. As a child, holidays meant ovens warming the house, delicious smells filling the rooms, counter tops brimming with wonderful treats. Homemade desserts and baked goods bring these things and more to the holidays. They bring smiles to the faces of friends and guests and family. They bring joy to the heart.
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    6 cups thinly sliced, peeled apples (6 medium) ¾ cup sugar 2 tablespoons King Arthur Gluten-Free Multipurpose Flour ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon lemon juice Directions:
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    Whisk the egg and vinegar or lemon juice together till very foamy. Mix egg and vinegar mixture into the dry ingredients. Stir until the mixture holds together, adding 1 to 3 additional tablespoons cold water if necessary.
    Shape into a ball and chill for an hour, or up to overnight.
    Allow the dough to rest at room temperature for 10 to 15 minutes before rolling.
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    Tip: The egg yolk makes this crust vulnerable to burned edges, so always shield the edges of the crust, with aluminum foil or a pie shield, to protect them while baking.
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    Holiday Pumpkin Bread (Gluten-Free) Orange Walnut Bread (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Pie Banana Nut Bread #3 (Gluten-Free) Gingerbread #2 (Gluten-Free) Decadent Gluten-Free Triple Chocolate Chunk Cookies Quick Cranberry Coconut Cookies (Gluten-Free) Molasses Spice Cookies (Gluten-Free) Snickerdoodles (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies (Gluten-Free) Soft Sugar Cookies (Gluten-Free) Frosted Pumpkin Bars (Gluten-Free) Sugar & Spice Madeleines (Gluten-Free) Lebkuchen (German Ginger Cookies - Gluten-Free) Three Ingredient Gluten-Free Pie Crust Danish (Gluten-Free) Pumpkin Cheesecake with Butter Pecan Crust (Gluten-Free) Apple Crisp #2 (Gluten-Free)  Tasty Apple Crisp (Gluten-Free)

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.