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    Konjac Angel Hair Zero Calorie Pasta & Glucomannan Powder


    Scott Adams
    • It is known as “moyu” or “juruo” in China, and “konnyaku” or “shirataki noodles” in Japan.

    Konjac Angel Hair Zero Calorie Pasta & Glucomannan Powder
    Image Caption: Konjac Angel Hair Pasta

    Celiac.com 03/30/2018 - As most people know already, “al dente” is an Italian term that describes how pasta should be prepared—not too hard, and not too soft. Konjac Angel Hair Zero Calorie Pasta by Konjac Foods comes ready-to-eat in 8.8 ounce packages that are filled with water, so the noodles are kept wet and ready-to-eat within the package, and despite this, the Konjac noodles are still perfectly al dente—firm but not soft. 

    Remarkably these noodles are marketed as “0 Calories,” and are free of sugar, fat, soy, and gluten. Their only ingredients are konjac glucomannan fiber, calcium hydroxide, and purified water. For those who don't know,  konjac glucomannan (KGM) is “a water-soluable dietary fiber derived from the root of the konjac plant.” It is known as “moyu” or “juruo” in China, and “konnyaku” or “shirataki noodles” in Japan.

    Besides being a great noodle choice for those on a gluten-free diet, Konjac noodles are also ideal for people on weight-loss or diabetic diets, as they are high in fiber and contain zero calories. Amazingly, the shelf life of these individual serving-sized packages is one full year at room temperature, so you can feel free to stock up on them.

    Konjac Foods also makes “Konjac Gucomannan Powder” in 500g packages. One teaspoon of the konjac powder can be added to 8 ounces of your favorite drink, including in smoothies. The dietary fiber in konjac flour is also water soluble, and according to the maker it has: “a greater potential to reduce postprandial blood glucose, insulin, and serum lipid levels than insoluble fiber.” 

    I tried both products, and found that the noodles were an excellent substitute for rice noodles in my homemade ramen. I also tried the noodles as a spaghetti replacement, and although they had a different texture than I'm used to, I really enjoyed it. The powder can be added as a fiber supplement to foods, drinks, and shakes, and I tried it in a smoothie. 

    Anyone who is dieting to lose weight, on a gluten-free or diabetic diet, or just looking for a more healthy noodle substitute (that won't spike your blood sugar) will appreciate these Konjac Foods products.  

    For more info visit their site.

    Edited by admin

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Jefferson Adams
    As a kid, shrimp was one of my perpetual favorite foods. If something had shrimp in it, I'd probably eat try it. Shrimp is the reason I first tried gumbo, teriyaki, scampi, fried rice and coconut curry.
    I think that the vast majority of my exposure to international cuisine came out of my love for the lowly, bottom-dwelling, water bug that is the shrimp. I still one them to this day. This recipe grabs them hot off the grill and tosses them into a pile of rice noodles in a delicious Southeast-Asian inspired sauce. This is a great way to dip your culinary toes in Asian waters without breaking the bank or freaking out the taste buds of more timid eaters.
    Ingredients:
    14 ounces flat rice noodles
    ½ cup fresh lime juice
    ⅓ cup fish sauce
    ½ cup packed light brown sugar
    2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
    1 to 2 teaspoons Asian chili sauce (such as Sriracha)
    1 pound medium-large shrimp, peeled and deveined
    1 medium bunch asparagus, trimmed
    5 ounces Shiitake mushrooms, trimmed
    1 medium carrot, shredded
    ½ cup fresh cilantro
    Directions:
    Bring a large pot of water to a boil.
    Add the noodles and cook as the label directs; drain and rinse with cold water.
    Meanwhile, whisk the lime juice, fish sauce, brown sugar, garlic, chili sauce and 1/3 cup water in a medium bowl. Transfer 1/4 cup of the marinade to another bowl and toss with the shrimp. Toss another 1/4 cup marinade with the asparagus and mushrooms in a third bowl. Let the shrimp and vegetables marinate 10 minutes at room temperature. Toss the noodles with the remaining marinade.
    Heat a grill or grill pan to medium-high. Grill the shrimp, asparagus and mushrooms until the shrimp is just cooked through and the asparagus is slightly tender, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Halve the mushrooms and cut the asparagus into pieces. Stir in the noodles and cook another minute or two, stirring well with a wooden spoon to prevent sticking.
    Divide the noodles among bowls and top with the shrimp, asparagus, mushrooms, carrot and cilantro.


    Dr. Frank Jackson
    The Celiac Dilemma: Getting Enough Fiber Without Wheat
    Celiac.com 12/17/2013 - One of the biggest hurdles for those who have celiac disease is finding a way to get enough fiber in their diets. Removing wheat from the equation also eliminates a huge amount of roughage. Wheat provides the fiber in many breads, pastas, crackers and other staples of the American diet. Replacing that fiber is crucial, since the added bulk moves the food through your digestive system and keeps you regular.
    You should be aiming to consume between 25 and 35 grams of fiber per day. Here are a few ways to ensure you’re getting enough fiber in your diet, whether you’ve been living with celiac disease your entire life or just for a few weeks.
    Bulk Up Your Food
    There are plenty of fiber-rich foods that do not contain gluten. For example, fruits and vegetables are a great, all-natural source of fiber. You can add them to soups and sauces for a flavorful kick that will also provide a few extra grams of fiber. Skip the croutons on your salad — most contain gluten anyway — and sub in raisins for a sweet, filling treat.
    Flaxseed and chia seeds are two superfoods that are naturally gluten free and contain a hefty dose of fiber. Stir them into smoothies, sprinkle on your breakfast cereal, or shake them over yogurt to give it a bit of a crunch. With several grams of fiber per serving, nuts are also a great addition to just about any main or side dish. Kidney beans or chickpeas can be stirred into soups to increase the fiber count.
    Use Supplements
    Adding a supplement to your diet can be an excellent way to make up for the fiber you’re losing by not eating wheat. You’ll want to find natural supplements that mimic the way fiber found in food breaks down in your gut. One smart option is a prebiotic, such as Prebiotin — a plant fiber that also provides good bacteria to the colon, further aiding in digestion.
    Make Adjustments
    It’s possible to increase the fiber content in your diet by making simple substitutions. Perhaps you have always eaten white rice, which is easier on your sensitive stomach than brown. Well, now’s the time to give fiber-rich brown rice another try. Since your celiac diagnosis has probably cleared up most of your GI issues, you should be able to eat brown rice now without issue. Or try fiber-laden quinoa, a rice substitute that’s rich in both fiber and protein, as well as millet or amaranth as a white rice fill-in.
    Keep a Tally
    Before your celiac diagnosis, you may not have paid any attention to your daily fiber intake. But now it’s essential to track it for at least a few weeks to make sure you’re getting enough fiber. Aim for 20 grams at first, until you get the hang of searching out non-wheat fiber sources. Eventually, you’ll want to get to 25 or more grams per day, and you may find it’s not as hard as you expected.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/03/2015 - You can make this with rice noodles or pure buckwheat soba noodles. The key is to cook the noodles only until they're halfway done, and then remove them from the hot water. They should be pliable, but still firm in the center. Pan-frying will finishes the cooking process. Add chicken, or shrimp, and you have the makings of a great meal.
    Ingredients:
    6-8 ounces of boneless chicken chunks, or cleaned, shelled and deveined shrimp 6 ounces gluten-free buckwheat soba, or rice noodles 2 large eggs, beaten 3 tablespoons soy sauce, more to taste 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger 2 teaspoons rice wine or rice vinegar 1 teaspoon sesame oil 2½ tablespoons cooking oil, more as needed 5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 2 cups washed baby spinach or Chinese broccoli leaves 1 to 2 teaspoons Sriracha or other hot sauce, as desired 1 teaspoon gluten-free fish sauce (I use Squid brand) One bunch thinly sliced scallions, both white and green part Juice of ½ lime, to taste 1 cup cilantro leaves, rinsed ¼ teaspoon kosher salt, more as needed ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper Directions:
    In a small bowl, combine the scallions, soy sauce, ginger, rice wine or vinegar, sesame oil and salt. Let stand while you prepare the noodles.
    In a large pot of boiling water, cook noodles until they are halfway done. They should be soft on the outside, but firm on the inside.
    Drain well and toss with ½ tablespoon of the peanut oil to keep them from sticking, and spread them out on a plate or baking sheet.
    In a large skillet over medium-high heat, warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of cooking oil. Add the garlic and cook until crisp and golden around the edges, 1 to 2 minutes.
    Add half the scallion mixture and stir-fry until fragrant, about 1 minute.
    Cook the chicken or prawns by stir-frying it in the same wok/skillet until nearly done, then removing it and setting it aside.
    Add noodles; stir-fry until noodles are hot and lightly coated with sauce, about 30 seconds.
    Add spinach, fish sauce, sriracha, remaining scallion mixture, salt and pepper, and continue to stir-fry until the spinach begins to wilt. Add the cooked chicken or shrimp back into the wok at the same time as the eggs. Stir until chicken/shrimp and eggs are cooked, about 1 to 2 minutes longer.
    Remove from heat and stir in lime juice. Garnish with cilantro and sesame seeds or peanuts.

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